Originally created 08/12/01

Pocket change



HIGHER, HIGHER EDUCATION: Recent studies indicate babies born this year will need between $50,000 and $100,000 each for their college education and that only 25 percent of parents foresee footing the entire bill. At least 68 percent hope to pay half of each child's college expenses.

The College Board expects costs at private schools to approach $225,000 per degree in 2023.

Current high school grads project their degrees to cost about $35,000 from a public university.

AGE DISCRIMINATION? Age-discrimination complaints have turned sharply upward after dropping steadily through the 1990s, according to statistics kept by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Charges fell from 19,800 in 1993 to 14,000 in 1999. But last year, age-based complaints rose 13.2 percent to 16,000. And in the first half of fiscal 2000-01, complaints jumped an additional 15.4 percent.

Is it a coincidence that about 3 million of the nation's 76 million baby boomers turn 55 this year?

EYE OF BEHOLDER: The condition of your work space can be viewed as the window to your soul, according to a survey by IOGEAR, a computer company in Irvine, Calif.

In an informal survey of 138 business people, 73 percent said their mixed impressions of colleagues were influenced by the way their desks are organized.

Nearly 70 percent believed workers with messy desks are perceived as less career-driven, while others tagged nonfastidious counterparts as workaholics.

TV TENNIS: David Meister, former head of HBO Sports, seems to think we want more sports on TV. He's preparing to launch the Tennis Channel, a cable station devoted to the tournaments, equipment and pros' lifestyles, in mid-2002.

ID THEFT: Someone/something tracking our Internet habits and thus collecting personal information concerns 61 percent of U.S. citizens. That's the finding of a recent poll by Time magazine and CNN.

The FBI estimates that 500,000 Americans have their identities stolen each year.

ON TOP OF OLD SMOKY: The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the nation's second best for high-country wildflowers, reports adventure travel Web site GORP.com.

The North Carolina/Tennessee area is second only to Adirondack Park, N.Y. All others in the site's top 10 are west of the Mississippi.