Originally created 06/29/01

Overtime



Former Georgia Tech basketball coach Bobby Cremins and Kansas coach Roy Williams are on the tournament committee of a golf tournament scheduled for the River Golf Club in North Augusta next month.

The Basketball Coaches Golf Tournament will be played Friday, July 13. Each four-man scramble team will consist of at least one coach who will be in town for the Peach Jam basketball tournament. The pairings will be done by lottery.

The tournament is open to all golfers. Entry fee of $100 benefits the Children's Medical Center at the Medical College of Georgia.

The field will be limited to the first 50 golfers with the deadline for entry is July 10. To sign up, call River Club head pro Chris Verdery at 202-0110.

HOCKEY: Dominik Hasek has made a good living out of keeping people guessing, particularly hopeful goal-scorers attempting to a find a weakness in "The Dominator."

Now, on the verge of free agency, Hasek has everyone guessing whether he'll remain a member of the Buffalo Sabres for $9 million.

It's a high-stakes faceoff in which the Sabres stand to lose the most: a cost-conscious, small-market franchise caught between paying one of the most expensive one-year deals in league history or losing a six-time Vezina Trophy-winning goalie for nothing when the signing deadline strikes Saturday night.

The Sabres have the option of trading Hasek before then. But what team would swing that deal today if it can go after Hasek as an unrestricted free agent on Sunday?

So the Sabres are seriously considering re-signing Hasek in order to, at the very least, use him as trade bait.

FOOTBALL: World Wrestling Federation Entertainment Inc.'s disastrous XFL venture forced a fourth-quarter loss of $20.4 million and cut full-year profits in 2001 to about a third of the previous year's earnings.

WWF, which took an after-tax charge of $36.2 million on the football league's failure, reported a loss of $20.4 million, or 28 cents per share, for the quarter ended April 30.

That compares with pro forma profit of $9.4 million, or 14 cents per share, for the same quarter a year ago.

"We rolled the dice on XFL and it didn't work out quite as we expected it would," said Judd Everhart, a WWF spokesman.

The XFL, a joint venture with NBC, folded after one season in which television viewership plummeted steadily.

BOAT RACING: Tickets for the 16th annual Augusta Southern Nationals, scheduled July 21-23, are on sale. They can be purchased at www.tixonline.com or by calling (803) 278-4849. For more information, call (803) 819-0441.

HORSE RACING: Trainer Bob Baffert said Thursday he hopes his appeal of a suspension for a positive drug test on one of his horses forces changes in California racing rules.

Baffert had his 60-day suspension stayed by a Superior Court judge after California Horse Racing Board chairman Robert Tourtelot denied the trainer's request. The stay is in effect while Baffert pursues an appeal.

"The ones that know me know it's bogus, but it hurts racing for people that don't know," Baffert said by phone from his Santa Anita barn in his first public comments since the suspension was announced June 17.

"They could overturn it tomorrow, but the damage has been done," he said.

The suspension stems from the positive test on Nautical Look after the filly won at Hollywood Park in May 2000, when Baffert was at Churchill Downs preparing Captain Steve for the Kentucky Derby, a race he won in 1997 and 1998.

A post-race urine test was positive for morphine, a drug that is legal for therapeutic reasons but can't be in a horse's system on race day.

According to Baffert and his attorney, Neil Papiano, there were "trace" levels of morphine in the filly through accidental contamination of her feed.

Among the CHRB rules Baffert would like to see changed is one requiring that trainers ensure the condition of a horse, regardless if they are present on race day. Baffert has many horses under training, and he was 2,000 miles away at the time.

COLLEGES: The University of South Carolina has been honored by the American Football Coaches Association for graduating more than 70 percent of its football players from this past season.

South Carolina was among 30 NCAA Division I schools to reach that level, the AFCA said this week. It was the fourth time in five seasons the Gamecocks program was honored by the coaches' group.

The latest study tracked the class that began in the academic year of 1995-96. Ninety-five schools took part in the survey.

Notre Dame and Vanderbilt led the way, graduating 100 percent of their players in that class. Joining South Carolina were schools such as Duke, Michigan, Nebraska, Penn State and Virginia.

GOLF: Augusta's Laura Coble lost in the second round of the 99th Women's North and South Amateur Championship at the Pinehurst Resort in Pinehurst, N.C. Coble, who beat Katie Brenny of Little Falls, Minn., 6 and 5 in the first round, lost to Candy Hannemann of Durham, N.C., 5 and 4 in the second round. Today's 36-hole final pits Mimi Epps against Meredith Duncan at the Pinehurst No. 2 course.

BASEBALL: An 18-year-old baseball player has died from injuries caused when he collided with a teammate as they chased down a fly ball.

Brendon Grant was playing left field when he ran into the center fielder during a game in suburban Belmont on Wednesday. He was struck in the neck and chest.

"They collided, and having seen a number of these and having been involved with baseball, nobody, and I mean nobody, thought it was anything but a collision," said Dan Kelleher, who coached the team in the Middlesex Senior Babe Ruth League. "Then one of the boys said, 'Mr. Kelleher, Brendan's having a difficult time breathing.' We all dropped everything."

Paramedics restored Grant's vital signs, but he died later at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge.

Grant died of a fracture to the larynx and cricoid, the cartilage around the larynx, according to the state medical examiner's office, which performed an autopsy Thursday. He also experienced secondary blunt trauma to the neck.