Originally created 03/10/01

Parnevik, Tryon shine at Honda



CORAL SPRINGS, Fla. -- Jesper Parnevik maintained the lead and Ty Tryon stayed in the spotlight.

Parnevik shot a 5-under-par 67 Friday in the second round of the Honda Classic and was three strokes ahead of John Huston (67), Mark Calcavecchia (68) and Chris Smith (68). Parnevik was at 132, 12 under after 36 holes on TPC at Heron Bay.

But Tryon, a 16-year-old high school sophomore from Orlando, garnered much of the attention for the second straight day.

Doing something that even Tiger Woods never did, Tryon made the cut in his first PGA Tour event. He was 1-over on a windy afternoon, but it was good enough to make him the second-youngest player to make the cut in a PGA Tour event.

Bob Panasik was 15 years, 8 months old when he made the cut at the 1957 Canadian Open. At 16 years, 9 months, Tryon finished the first two rounds at 140. The cut was 142.

"I'm incredibly happy right now, and if I didn't finish so bad I would probably be crazy right now," Tryon said after his 73. "But I finished really bad, so that puts a little damper on my happiness."

Woods was nine months younger than Tryon when he was given a sponsor's exemption into the Los Angeles Open in 1992. But he missed the cut with rounds of 72 and 75.

"It's just kind of the right place at the right time," said Tryon, who qualified for the tournament on Monday. "Tiger has done some incredible things. This is just one thing he hasn't done. I just feel really good about this."

Tryon, who started the second round on the back nine, moved into second place at 9 under with birdies on Nos. 2, 3 and 4. But he gave two strokes back on the par-3 No. 5.

His tee shot flew the green, landing in thick rough. He tried a flop shot but nearly missed the ball. It barely moved, and Tryon ended up with a 5.

"That kind of set off a bogey trend," he said.

He bogeyed three of the next four holes. But the rough round did little to spoil his exciting experience.

Making the turn, he was hounded for autographs. He signed as many as he could, but still felt bad when he was whisked away to the next tee.

He also got plenty of support from his fellow golfers. Jeremy Anderson left him a congratulatory note in his locker, and several others did the same.

"I talked to a few guys and we could hardly remember what we did when we were 16," said the 36-year-old Parnevik. "I just remember how nervous I was at that age, so what he's doing here is unbelievable."

Calcavecchia, who had knee surgery just two weeks ago, also is having an unbelievable tournament. The two-time Honda Classic winner who started on the back nine, was in pain for much of the round. But it didn't affect his game.

He birdied Nos. 6 and 7 to move to 10 under. But he gave a stroke back on No. 8 with a three-putt.

Calcavecchia drained a 50-footer on the par-4 sixth, then followed it with two of his best shots of the day and almost had an eagle.

He drove his tee shot on No. 7 only 250 yards -- but it was directly into a gusting wind. Then he hit a wedge that trickled just past the left side of the hole, leaving him with a 4-footer for another birdie.

Calcavecchia also barely missed a birdie putt on No. 9.

"My goal was to make the cut," he said. "I know it doesn't sound like much, but I didn't know what to expect with my knee."

Playing in the group behind Calcavecchia, Parnevik birdied four holes on the front nine en route to 12 under.

"In tougher conditions I seem to play better," Parnevik said.

Divots: Richie Coughlan recorded a hole-in-one on the par-3 No. 15. Coughlan hit a 3-iron from 225 yards. It was the first hole-in-one at the Honda Classic since the tournament moved to Heron Bay in 1996. ... Steve Pate withdrew before the second round with a rib injury. He became the only past champion to miss the cut. ... John Riegger also withdrew with an illness. ... With the wind gusting to 15 mph, the course played much tougher Friday. Ninety-four players were under par in the opening round; only 72 on the second day. "It was tough out there. The greens were rock hard and fast as lightning," Calcavecchia said.