Originally created 11/15/00

ProfNet.com gives insight on election



MOVING THE ELECTION TO THE INTERNET
What will happen if elections ever move to Internet voting and what are the risks and rewards of moving voting to the Internet in the future? Matt Cutler, co-founder and CEIO of NetGenesis and Jay Henderson, product marketing manager for NetGenesis, are experts in Web security issues and the tracking of user's personal information. Based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, NetGenesis is a leader in e-customer intelligence with over 400 market leaders in financial services, high tech, mediaentertainment, pharmaceutical and consumer goods use NetGenesis to improve online business strategy.

NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR VOTING -- DIGITAL CERTIFICATES
"Digital Certificates," which can identify, authenticate and ensure a tamper proof record of each individual voter and hisher vote, may be a solution to the voting irregularities of the sort we've seen in Palm Beach. Executives at SHYM Technology, manufactures of the digital certificate technology, are available to discuss digital certificate technology and the ability to secure election transactions.

WOMEN TURNING TO THE INTERNET FOR ANSWERS
The Internet has emerged as a popular forum for women to investigate the issues related to the election process, says Nancy Evans, editor-in-chief and co-founder of iVillage.com. "Women respond to simple solutions rather than big policy initiatives," says Evans. "Over time, this has got to change the way candidates talk." News Contact: Ana Ossowski, Kaplow Communications

AFFECTS OF POLITICS ON NEW MEDIA
New media, from the Internet to mass media influenced by the Internet, have affected the nature of our inter-personal relationships, everything from the way family members communicate to how we conduct national politics, says Michael Kahan, Brooklyn College political science professor and author of "Media as Politics: Theory, Behavior and Change in America." "New media has led to a decline in importance of political parties and a decline in traditional forms of participation such as voting," says Kahan. An educator for almost 40 years, Kahan is widely published and has worked in journalism and in politics.

INTERNET NOT UP TO SPEED ON ELECTION DAY
Millions of Web users surfing for information on Election Day found that many sites were completely incapacitated by high traffic volume, says Alan Ota, marketing manager for Hewlett Packard's Web QoS. "The Web infrastructure buckled under the strain of this election," remarks Ota, an expert with insight on what Internet news sites could have done to control, stabilize and prioritize traffic. "Current technologies limit the usefulness of the Internet for supporting critical activities, such as presidential election news coverage." News Contact: Sherrie Weldon, The Hoffman Agency

POLITICS AND THE MEDIA
Donald Greenberg, associate professor of politics at Fairfield University, is an expert on American politics and how it's covered by the media. He also teaches issues of constitutional law, especially the 1st and 14th amendments, freedom of speech, affirmative action, and race/gender discrimination.

UNPRECEDENTED MEDIA USAGE
All of the major news sites were hit with unprecedented traffic on Election Day, says Jeff Young, vice president of Akamai Technologies, whose customers include, CNN.com, MSNBC.com, ABCNews.com and Yahoo! Young is uniquely qualified to discuss how each/all of these sites managed the unprecedented Election Day demand. CNN.com delivered more than 100 million page impressions and 6.3 million unique visitors on November 7, Election Day, Yahoo! News tripled their previous traffic record, and ABCNews.com had 23 million page views, doubling the record they set in 1998 when they posted the Ken Starr report on the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal.

MEDIA AND THE ELECTION
"No one wants another Dewey-Truman headline," says Tom Eveslage, Temple University journalism professor. "The practices (of the media) that have been used in the past have been thrown into question by this election. The Internet factor only intensifies the rush to get the news out," says Eveslage.

TELEVISION'S REPORTING OF ELECTION RESULTS
When all is said and done, the television news media, and their reporting of the elections, will likely take a hit, says Sylvia Chan-Olmsted, associate professor of telecommunication who teaches classes in telecommunication management, programming, and audience analysis. "I think the TV industry will reexamine that process," she said. "It's just too big a slip-up and too much egg on their face to predict something, then take it back, then predict something else and then take that back."

INTERNET'S IMPACT ON CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS
James Thurber, professor of government in American University's School of Public Affairs, is founder and director of AU's Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies and the center's institutes -- Campaign Management and Lobbying. Thurber has written extensively on presidential-congressional relations, campaigns and elections, and the impact of the Internet on campaigns and elections.

PREDICTING A VICTOR IN THE PRESIDENTIAL RACE
Allan J. Lichtman, professor in the Department of History in the American University's College of Arts and Sciences, is a leading expert on presidential and congressional campaigns, voting behavior, public opinion, and political history. He is well known for his "13 Keys" system, which predicted President Clinton's victory in 1996, George Bush's defeat in 1992, and the outcome of the 1988 presidential election when Michael Dukakis was well ahead in the polls. Using his "13 Keys" system, Lichtman had predicted that Vice President Al Gore will win the presidential election if Green Party candidate Ralph Nader does not receive five percent of the popular vote.

MEDIA ETHICS IN POLITICAL COVERAGE
Lewis Wolfson, professor emeritus of communication in American University's School of Communication, is a veteran analyst of government, politics, and media issues. He has been a research fellow in the Institute of Politics and a fellow at the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Wolfson has written and been interviewed about presidential and congressional politics, elections, the press and public policy, public opinion, and media ethics.

ISSUES AND THE MEDIA
Ingrid Reed is director of the Eagleton Institute of Politics' New Jersey Project at Rutgers-New Brunswick, which aims to coordinate, strengthen and expand the institute's efforts to assist individuals, organizations and governments in shaping New Jersey's political agenda. Reed coordinates the institute's partnership with the Alliance for Better Campaigns' efforts to get television stations to implement the recommendations of a national panel that they present five minutes per night of candidate-centered campaign coverage starting 30 days before the election. She can discuss the importance of issues-oriented rather than personality-driven campaigns, the media and campaigns and elections, and specific information about New Jersey campaigns and voters.

USABILITY TESTS COULD HAVE PREVENTED FLORIDA ELECTION MISHAP
Trellix Corporation CTO Dan Bricklin says the controversy surrounding the presidential election balloting in Florida could have been easily avoided had the government simply employed the type of usability testing that is a staple of software development. Bricklin, best known for co-creating the first electronic spreadsheet, VisiCalc, said that the state of Florida could have prevented this controversy by running simple usability tests prior to deploying the punch-hole ballots. "Elections, even important ones, such as the Presidential election, are often decided by much slim margins," says Bricklin.

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On the Net:

http://www.ireedrci.rutgers.edu

http://www.shym.com

http://www.ChanOlmstedjou.ufl.edu

http://www.anakaplowpr.com

http://www.sweldonhoffman.com

http://www.nhabetzFAIR1.FAIRFIELD.edu