Originally created 09/07/00

Race track noise ruining residents



Homes are the greatest investment made by people. For many, it is the only investment they can make for their old-age retirement and security. Attacks on the value of our homes is considered attacks on our lives, peace and prosperity.

These values are under attack by the Silver Eagles Speedway.

Noise is "unwanted sound," and it comes from the Latin word "nausea." In modern societies noise is most pervasive of pollutants and negatively affects physical health, mental health and well-being in general.

Noise induces loss of hearing, stress, high blood pressure, sleep loss, distraction, lost productivity and possible violence. Noise is a general reduction in the quality of life, opportunities for tranquility and a loss of invested money.

Residents have a legal right to peaceful use and quiet enjoyment of their property and the county has been notified of the medical and psychological impacts of noise. They cannot deny responsibility for harm done to residents by the race track.

An increase in violence in schools should be anticipated due to noise-induced stress, and the school system must be made aware of this so appropriate monitoring of student anger may be initiated. It may be necessary to initiate county monitoring of the mental health of all residents within a mile of the racetrack to insure that violence due to noise-induced stress is quickly dealt with.

Columbia County commissioners make minimal efforts to control noise and protect the air which is held in common by the public ... In 1999 residents near the speedway agreed to a 60 decibel noise level. The county invalidated that agreement by allowing the Silver Eagles to add 60 decibels to existing noise levels.

The Silver Eagles have no right to act like bullies and disregard the rights of the community and claim for themselves rights that are not theirs. Polluting the air, a common resource, is not a right and the injuring of the health and welfare of others is not morally correct.

They do not realize what most of us learned on the schoolyard years ago: That your right to swing your fist ends at my nose. Similarly, your right to create noise ends at my ear ...

Richard E. Hogue, Grovetown