Dinner theatre pays tribute to Charles Schultz
It's a clear, perfect day, blue of sky and warm of sun, the kind of day that can only be found in the Sunday comics. What could possibly go wrong on a day like this? Quite a bit if your name is Charlie Brown.

Thomson benefits from event

Dinner theatre pays tribute to Charles Schultz

Augusta players recapture magic of Wizard of Oz
When it was released in 1939, The Wizard of Oz dazzled movie-goers with its Technicolor-swirl approach to the classic children's tale.

Traveling exhibit pushes the boundaries of watercolor
Putting a bold new face on an established medium, the 132nd International Exhibition of the American Watercolor Society features 40 works that transcend and confound expectations of what a watercolor should be.

Thomson benefits from event
Born in 1901, he was never able to perform before thousands of adoring fans or bank thousands of dollars from record sales and concert dates. Like many blues musicians of his generation, Mr. McTell lived and died, in 1959, in relative anonymity.

Augusta players recapture magic of Wizard of Oz

Ramblin' Rhodes: Blind Willie had a soulmate
When Ruth Kate Seabrooks died on Oct. 3, 1991, her obituary in The Augusta Chronicle indicated she had lived an everyday life.

Songwriter hears heartbeat of America in blues music

Musician creates songs from a gumbo of styles
When music legend Delbert McClinton rolls into Augusta Saturday night to play the Hot Southern Night concert for the Augusta Red Cross, he'll bring an innate understanding of musical history.

Bursting with color
The grapefruit, neatly bisected, fairly drips from the canvas. Rendered in brilliant tones and bathed in a beam of morning sunlight, the textured canvas is a burst of color and light against the nondescript gray walls of the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art's main gallery.

Musician creates songs from a gumbo of styles

Drumbeat of equality will sound
Dancers, singers, drummers and the merely curious will gather Saturday and Sunday at Camp Linwood Hayne off Mike Padgett Highway to celebrate the culture and traditions of American Indians.

Ramblin' Rhodes: Blind Willie had a soulmate

Traveling exhibit pushes the boundaries of watercolor

Songwriter hears heartbeat of America in blues music
Whether delving into folk, the blues or rock anthems, Peter Case has built a career around sharp, insightful songs rooted in the idiom of American music.

Deion out of baseball for now

Braves notebook: Schuerholz seeks a veteran catcher

GreenJackets top RedStixx

Pitcher is 1-1 since return

South Carolina routs Vols

Braves fall to Marlins rookies

Harlem bats lack luster

Tech, Clemson go to wire in ACC

War Horses fall to Mullins

Barnwell adjusts enroute to final

Galarraga helps Braves end slump

Braves notes: Chipper Jones, Galarraga struggle for clutch hits

Ford extends streak in Jackets' 7-5 win

Eastside sweeps Harlem

Harlem loses Game 1 to Eastside

Late leader deserves street honor

Local ISPs succeed against industry giants
Independent Internet service providers, those scrappy dial-up companies that sprouted up in nearly every market during the mid-1990s, are still thriving even though Big Business now rules the Net.

Weekly gas prices

Weekly gas prices
Click on the graphic to view a larger version. The graphic shows prices of unleaded gasoline at area gas stations.

Local ISPs succeed against industry giants

Business briefs
Cumulus Media reached an agreement to extend the $242 million acquisition of 37 radio stations in nine markets from Connoisseur Communications, the company said Thursday.

New call waiting unveiled

Sky's the limit

Business briefs: Yarn company announces profits

Business briefs

Business briefs: Yarn company announces profits
Aiken-based Advanced Glassfiber Yarns on Thursday announced unaudited first-quarter earnings of $2.3 million, up from a loss of $800,000 a year ago, when the company charged off $3.6 million in extraordinary costs associated with debt.

Electronic filing speeds processing
ATLANTA - Increased use of electronic filing by Georgia taxpayers has helped the Department of Revenue get ahead of schedule in processing refunds for roughly 2 million returns.

City's rowing status at risk

New call waiting unveiled
BellSouth began offering a solution Tuesday to the two devices, one phone line problem. The company is offering a smart call-waiting service that will let you know someone is phoning when you are logged on the Internet.

Sky's the limit
at 10th and Broad streets. The restaurant, which is expected to open in early June, will serve soul food with an international flare. The diner will join other recently opened restaurants and bars in that area of Broad Street.

City's rowing status at risk
Augusta may lose its designation as a U.S. Olympic rowing center because not enough of the athletes training here can find employment, local rowing and sports council officials said this week.

Gamecocks focus on new season

Hoosiers should let night go

Source: Indiana might ask Knight to step down

Trustees to decide fate of Knight

Why not decommission both dams?

Rebel flag 'compromise' derided

Why a total gun ban wouldn't work

Exercise & parenting

Lynx eliminated and so is coverage

Rehashing race riot was a disservice

Bipartisan flag victory

Dr. Carl's dam river view draws fire

Mother's Day D.C. march defended

Harbin's newsletter called 'incomplete'

A 'secret' Gore plan?

End poor inspections

Lawn problems can be fixed with a little careful planning
I have several dead spots of various sizes in my centipede lawn. I don't think insects or disease is killing it. What do you think has happened and what should I do?

Authors find inspiration for books in faith
Two books - one the work of a minister in a red light district and the second, a gardener's solitary reflections on God - will be introduced in Augusta this week.

Revival ends on a good note
Jonathan Stone, 10, playfully stood behind his dad, evangelist Perry Stone Jr., for his cue to pass out free CDs to the revival crowd Monday at Fleming Church of God.

Faith digest
A weekend centered on strengthening the family through prayer will be held at Tabernacle Baptist Church, 1223 Laney Walker Blvd., starting with registration at noon today.

A rose is a rose
When your roses are drooping, turning brown or loosing leaves or buds, they are not laughing at you. They are begging for the meticulous attention they require to be robust beautiful blooming bushes.

Love turns up heat at Nelson Classic

S. Aiken holds 17 shot lead

Special teams may decide series

Czech, Slovakia to meet in historic final

Late leader deserves street honor
I'm sure someone out there is considering a lasting tribute to the late Dr. I.E. Washington, who passed away April 29 at age 91.

HUD encourages potential homeowners
Elaine Voltz has always wanted a lavender room. And last weekend one of the first things she did after becoming a first-time homeowner was paint one of her three bedrooms a light purple hue.

Faith digest

Authors find inspiration for books in faith

Revival ends on a good note

A rose is a rose

Lawn problems can be fixed with a little careful planning

Media, not protesters, make noise outside hearings on Cuban boy
ATLANTA - Armed with a home video camera, Sean Means said he had expected to film protesters outside the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals angry about possible asylum for Elian Gonzalez.

Program provides homes

Panel sends youth home
If John Hoehle could change one thing about the day he and two neighborhood buddies were arrested, he would have been in class.

Corps: Fort violates lake permit
Fort Gordon is violating its federal permit by using its Thurmond Lake recreation area as a venue for nationally advertised, commercial fishing tournaments, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

Conservation plan passes House
Landmark legislation to increase wildlife conservation funding nationwide - and funnel about $40 million in such revenues into Georgia - was passed by the U.S. House late Thursday afternoon.

Area native is dance pioneer
Augusta native Karen Brown, who has dedicated her life to the art of ballet, has been named artistic director of the Oakland Ballet, making her the first black woman to hold such a position at a major American dance company.

Water restrictions start early
Water restrictions went into effect at midnight Friday in Augusta - 10 days earlier than planned - because of a major waterline break and the loss of two wells.

Officials: $135 million needed for area schools
Richmond County school officials say they need about $135 million to continue physical improvements to school buildings.

Teen writer bares his soul for best seller
As mind-boggling as it must be to be 20 years old and already have a story published in a national best-seller, Derek Gamba of North Augusta takes it all in stride.

Exhibits astound pupils
NORTH AUGUSTA - Wearing goggles and oven mitts, pupils at North Augusta Elementary School drove nails into two-by-fours - using bananas as hammers.

Schools expect $10 million cost rise

Schrenko honors reading program

Panel sends youth home

Water restrictions start early

Panel seeks alterations in DFACS
ATHENS, Ga. - Sweeping changes are needed throughout the state Division of Family and Children Services to protect Georgia's children from abuse and neglect, according to a study by a 16-member task force.

Panel releases youth on probation

Profits will fund event
The Augusta Aviation Commission has begun planning for Skyfest 2001, and this time the group promises to organize better and enlist more help.

Aging inmates raise prison costs

Fire chief open to D.C. offer
Richmond County Fire Chief Ronnie Few doesn't know if he's one of three final candidates for the fire chief job in Washington, but he is willing to listen to offers, a spokeswoman said Thursday.

Stallions face powerful Twisters offense

Program provides homes
Elaine Voltz has always wanted a lavender room.

Across the area

Quality of water examined

Judges find tastiest tap water in Blythe

Across the area
TWIN CITY - A chemical spill at an Emanuel County manufacturing center Friday killed a 55-year-old employee and sent workers, law enforcement officers and fire personnel to a nearby hospital for treatment.

Area native is dance pioneer

City discusses start of water limitations
As far as the city's water use rules go, the word ``restriction'' should be replaced with the word ``conservation,'' said Augusta Utilities Director Max Hicks at a public meeting at Bell Terrace Community Center on Thursday night.

Officials: $135 million needed for area schools

Wrightsboro Road will get new turn lanes
It's happened to Nita Grinder one too many times. A fairly smooth drive to the mall ends when she finds herself amid several vehicles huddled at the bottom of the Bobby Jones Expressway ramp, fighting for a place in the one righthand lane leading to the Augusta Mall parking lot.

Exhibits astound pupils

Parking lot will replace cottages
SAVANNAH - Backing away from the controversy it often attracts, Savannah's historic review board has chosen not to fight for two tiny historic cottages in an old, working-class neighborhood.

Tax collector loses round in court

Judges find tastiest tap water in Blythe
ATLANTA - Calling something tasteless is usually not a compliment, but when it comes to drinking water, less taste is better.

Across the area: Challenge hearing moves to today

School board will meet with public
Sharon Adams spends several hours a week volunteering at her daughter's Richmond County Elementary school.

Panel seeks alterations in DFACS

Airport panel OKs new terminal plan
If everything falls just right, Augusta Regional Airport at Bush Field could have a brand new terminal in time to welcome those arriving for the Masters Tournament in 2002.

Panel releases youth on probation
The other 11-year-old involved in a plot to kidnap parents was released on probation this week, and his 13-year-old brother is appealing his lengthy sentence.

Math student to go to Washington

Schrenko honors reading program
In a most fitting way, State School Superintendent Linda Schrenko honored pupils of Dearing Elementary School on Friday for their reading skills.

Mom for a day
There's something about moms that won't let them sit still - not when there's work to be done.

Board sides with candidate
By a unanimous decision Friday, the Richmond County Board of Elections denied a local attorney's challenge to Woodrow Fryer's candidacy for sheriff.

Cave-in repairs
road, closed since Tuesday, was expected to reopen by this afternoon. The cave-in was larger than originally estimated.

Tax collector loses round in court
ATLANTA - Liberty County Tax Commissioner Carolyn Brown lost a bid Friday to end her court case without having to repay more than $1 million she paid herself in fees out of tax collections.

Across the area: Challenge hearing moves to today
The qualifying challenge hearing for Richmond County sheriff candidate Woodrow Fryer was changed from Monday to today by the Board of Elections on Thursday.

Pulaski project stalled

Airport panel OKs new terminal plan

Parking lot will replace cottages

Official touts benefits of gun program

Fire chief open to D.C. offer

Profits will fund event

Mom for a day

Project will help car flow
The Rev. Pierce Norman can't wait for completion of an intersection improvement project next to his church to be completed.

Physical education rule altered

Georgia Southern graduates first black doctoral recipient
Willie Wiley, an assistant principal at Richmond County's Westside High School, makes history today. He will be the first black person to receive a doctoral degree from Georgia Southern University.

Media, not protesters, make noise outside hearings on Cuban boy

Project will help car flow

Director is hired by panel
The Augusta Neighborhood Improvement Corp.'s executive committee voted unanimously Friday afternoon to offer its top job to Robert Cooks.

Panel: SRS needs easy procedures
Savannah River Site officials should simplify procedures designed to prevent accidental chain reactions at the federal nuclear-weapons site, a federal panel recommended Thursday.

Physical education rule altered
Georgia board's proposed change makes health, gym courses optional for middle school pupils

Aging inmates raise prison costs
ATLANTA - A combination of medical advances, tougher sentencing laws and fewer paroles is producing an older inmate population in Georgia, driving up the prison system's health costs substantially, according to a report released this week.

Bus, tow truck wreck
Denise Jones (center) escorts her daughters Caitlyn Rouse, 10, (left) and Candace Rouse, 9, from the scene of an accident on Milledgeville Road near Gordon Highway, where a Richmond County school bus hit a tow truck as it was making a turn into a parking lot. The wreck left a boy hospitalized.

Director is hired by panel

Schools expect $10 million cost rise
It could take $10 million dollars more than it did last year to run Richmond County's school system.

Wrightsboro Road will get new turn lanes

Panel: SRS needs easy procedures

Math student to go to Washington
AIKEN - Brandon Kearse has always done well in school, especially math. Today, his calculating skills are taking him all the way to Washington.

Cave-in repairs

Pulaski project stalled
SAVANNAH - The centerpiece of Savannah's once-scenic Monterey Square is a tall column wrapped in plastic, boarded up in plywood and caged in a rusty iron frame.

Quality of water examined
ATLANTA - Environmental and economic repercussions across Georgia are likely to result from the search for solutions to the Atlanta area's water-quality problems, members of a new committee of business and political leaders said Thursday.

Monkeying around
best of her, lowering her mask to see if anyone is watching. Lee Ann and other W.E. Parker Elementary School kindergartners practiced Thursday for next week's graduation ceremony for pupils at the school in Edgefield, S.C.

Monkeying around

Official touts benefits of gun program
AIKEN - Armed with a gun control proposal he claims really works, South Carolina Attorney General Charlie Condon told Aiken County Republicans on Monday night that his Palmetto Exile program would get criminals with guns off the streets.

Teen writer bares his soul for best seller

HUD encourages potential homeowners

Bus, tow truck wreck

Brand, Francis share rookie award

Reversal of call gives Heat win over Knicks

No-call, poor final play haunt Suns

Hawks pursue Izzo

Allegations against Knight continue

AugustaSports.Com: The Augusta Chronicle's Braves Coverage: Ford extends streak in Jackets' 7-5 win 05/12/00

AugustaSports.Com: The Augusta Chronicle's College Football Coverage: Gamecocks focus on new season 05/12/00

AugustaSports.Com: The Augusta Chronicle's Sports Coverage: Richmond boys aim for state crown 05/12/00

Mrs. Huff-Baker
Mrs. Dorothy C. Huff-Baker, accomplished pianist, organist and songwriter, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Effie Yonce
JOHNSTON, S.C. - Mrs. Effie Clark Hite Yonce, 92, died Thursday, May 11, 2000, at Saluda Nursing Center, Saluda.

Mrs. Sewilla Curry
OCONEE, Ga. - Mrs. Sewilla Norris Curry, 85, of South Brown Street, died Thursday, May 11, 2000, at Washington Regional Medical Center, Sandersville.

Mr. Eugene Knight
ST. CLAIR, Ga. - Mr. Arthur Eugene Knight, 65, died Friday, May 12, 2000, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Robert Jordan
MITCHELL, Ga. - Mr. Robert Jordan, 87, died Monday, May 8, 2000, at Warrenton Health and Rehabilitation, Warrenton.

Mrs. Mattie Hannah
WRENS, Ga. - Mrs. Mattie Hannah, 86, of Center Street, died Thursday, May 11, 2000, at Burke County Hospital, Waynesboro.

Mrs. Mary Toole
Mrs. Mary A. Bunch Toole, 67, died Thursday, May 11, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mr. John Caldwell
Mr. John David Caldwell, of Evans, died Thursday, May 11, 2000, at University Hospital. The funeral will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Aldersgate United Methodist Church with the Revs. Coy Hinton and Rudolph Dixon officiating. Burial will be in Westover Memorial Park.

Mrs. Anne Barrett
ATLANTA - Mrs. Anne Berckman Barrett, 91, died Monday, May 8, 2000, at her residence.

Mr. William James
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. - Mr. William James, 55, of Floyd Street, died Tuesday, May 9, 2000, at his residence.

Mrs. Sara Jones
LANGLEY - Mrs. Sara Boyd Jones, 79, of Wayland Street, died Tuesday, May 9, 2000, at National Health Care Nursing Center, North Augusta.

Mr. Willie Johns
FAIRFAX, S.C. - Mr. Willie Lagree Johns, 68, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at his residence.

Mrs. Westeen McBride
NEW YORK - Mrs. Westeen Mims McBride, 64, of 155th Street, died Tuesday, May 9, 2000, at Harlem Hospital.

Mrs. LaDoris Jenkins-Warren
BLUFFTON, S.C. - Mrs. LaDoris Eugenia Jenkins-Warren, 23, died Tuesday, May 9, 2000, at her residence.

Mrs. Elizabeth Henry
HEPHZIBAH - Mrs. Elizabeth A. Henry, 71, of Hephzibah-McBean Road, died Friday, May 12, 2000, at her residence.

Mrs. Ogreta Ferguson
FAIRFAX, S.C. - Mrs. Ogreta Roberts Ferguson, 70, died Sunday, May 7, 2000, at her residence.

Miss Beatrice Sprouse
SALUDA, S.C. - Miss Dorothy Beatrice Sprouse, 88, died Friday, May 12, 2000, at Providence Hospital, Columbia.

Mr. Richard McConnell Sr.
SWAINSBORO, Ga. - Mr. Richard McConnell Sr., 94, died Monday, May 8, 2000, at Emanuel Medical Center.

Mrs. Ruth Headstrom
AIKEN - Mrs. Ruth Leone Woleben Headstrom, 99, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at Eden Gardens.

Mr. Johnny Ford
MIDVILLE, Ga. - Mr. Johnny ``Sport'' Ford, 59, of Wadley Coleman Lake Road, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at Emanuel Medical Center, Swainsboro.

Mrs. Ruth Headstrom
AIKEN - Mrs. Ruth Leone Woleben Headstrom, 99, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at Eden Gardens.

Mrs. Nannie Aldridge
LA GRANGE, N.C. - Mrs. Nannie Holloman Aldridge, 86, of Aldridge Store Road, died Sunday, May 6, 2000, at Kitty Askins Hospice Center.

Mr. William Roberts
AIKEN - Mr. William Andrew Roberts, 68, of Princess Lane, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000.

Mr. Marvin Roberson
WAYNESBORO, Ga. - Mr. Marvin Leon Roberson, 38, of Idlewood Drive, died Monday, May 8, 2000, at Burke County Hospital.

Dorothy C. Huff-Baker
Mrs. Dorothy C. Huff-Baker, accomplished pianist, organist and songwriter, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mr. Glenn Davenport
WAGENER - Mr. Glenn R. Davenport, 37, of Pine Street, died Monday, May 8, 2000, at Palmetto Baptist Medical Hospital, Columbia.

Mr. Earl Wesbey
HEPHZIBAH - Mr. Earl Wesbey, of Windsor Spring Road, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Horace Batts Sr.
BRUNSWICK, Ga. - Mr. Horace Lee Batts Sr., 97, of Wildwood Drive, died Saturday, May 6, 2000, at Sunbridge Nursing Home.

Mr. Douglas Williams
Mr. Douglas Nesbit Williams, 77, of Martinez, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Lucille Stumpf
COLUMBIA - Mrs. Lucille Vantine Stumpf, 86, died Friday, May 5, 2000.

Mrs. Luretha Kemp
Mrs. Luretha Fielding Kemp, of Alabama Road, died Wednesday, May 10, 2000, at her residence.

Mrs. Ogreta Ferguson

Mr. Horace Batts Sr.

Mr. Willie Johns

Dorothy C. Huff-Baker

Mr. William James

Mrs. Ruth Headstrom

Mr. Glenn Davenport

Mr. Eugene Knight

Mr. Earl Wesbey

Mr. Robert Jordan

Mrs. Huff-Baker

Mrs. Mary Toole

Mr. William Roberts

Mrs. Elizabeth Henry

Mrs. Sara Jones

Mrs. Mattie Hannah

Mrs. Nannie Aldridge

Mrs. Sewilla Curry

Mr. Douglas Williams

Mrs. Effie Yonce

Mrs. Lucille Stumpf

Mrs. LaDoris Jenkins-Warren

Mr. John Caldwell

Mrs. Anne Barrett

Mr. Marvin Roberson

Mrs. Ruth Headstrom

'Last' visit home prepares him for final one
IT WAS the best of times; but for the first time in 75 years the cedar-shingled house at 117 Shenandoah Ave. in Loch Lynn, Md., is not owned by someone whose last name is Sisler.

Paper's exemplar moms deteriorating
Sunday is Mother's Day and I anticipate that your paper, as with others in the country, will include an article about a local mother. In recent years the trend has been to honor a woman who has a lot of children, not a lot of money and no husband. Beverly Simpson, North Augusta

Why a total gun ban wouldn't work
Ellen Goodman's column regarding the Million Mom March for gun control was frustrating for me to read. When well-meaning and intelligent people crusade for any cause that would be a hopeless failure if implemented, it is unfortunate. Melvin Edwards, Crawfordville

Mother's Day D.C. march defended
What a novel solution columnist Betsy Hart proposes to the problem of children losing their lives to gun violence. I'm sure that all mothers, including those marching in the ``Million Mom March'' Sunday, are in agreement that we need father figures in our children's lives. Nancy Thompson, Augusta

No winners in Confederate flag tiff
The controversy surrounding the relocation of the Confederate battle flag continues to swell in South Carolina and is about to erupt in Georgia. Brian Green, Augusta

A 'secret' Gore plan?
According to Vice President Al Gore, all of GOP presidential rival George W. Bush's proposals are ''risky schemes'' - risky tax schemes, risky foreign policy schemes and, of course, a risky Social Security scheme.

Putin: man of mystery
Foreign policy analysts in government and the media are poring over new Russian President Vladimir Putin's inaugural address for some clues as to where he intends to take his beleaguered nation, domestically or internationally. It's akin to reading tea leaves.

Exercise & parenting
For years American school kids have been scrambling to catch up academically with their peers in other nations. Now new studies show they need to scramble to catch up physically, too.

Is attack on American flag next?
I am sick of hearing about the flag compromise. A compromise is not one side dictating ever-escalating, non-negotiable demands to which the other side must immediately submit or be branded as uncompromising, immoral racists. Dave Stewart, Grovetown

Dr. Carl's dam river view draws fire
Frank Carl, who is known to express the views of the Sierra Club, attacked Sonny and Polly Goldston of North Augusta on May 9, for their reasonable concept of what the river would look like following a permanent decommissioning of the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam. Lowell Greenbaum, Augusta

Rebel flag 'compromise' derided
Many South Carolina lawmakers support the Confederate battle flag ``compromise'' in the mistaken belief it will end the controversy. On the contrary, passing the compromise will only whet the appetite of those seeking to eliminate every last vestige of the Old South from public life. Gary Bunker, Aiken

Is Augusta Fire Dept. up to date?
A very interesting segment appeared on Dateline May 8. It had to do with fire departments and firefighting equipment. It caused me to wonder if the Augusta Fire Department is as up-to-date as Fire Chief Ronnie Few would like all of you to believe. Kathleen Gibson, North Augusta

Moms' march a demeaning exercise
Traditionally Mother's Day was celebrated as a family get-together to honor our mothers. Grandmothers and even great-grandmothers were there unless they were sharing honors with family members in other locations. Helen I. Bolen, North Augusta

'Last' visit home prepares him for final one
IT WAS the best of times; but for the first time in 75 years the cedar-shingled house at 117 Shenandoah Ave. in Loch Lynn, Md., is not owned by someone whose last name is Sisler.

End poor inspections
Two Augusta commissioners are to be commended for exposing shoddy city building inspections, and a Commission majority should be applauded for prompting Housing and Neighborhood Development Director Kevin Mack to initiate reform.

Rehashing race riot was a disservice
Your May 7 front page headline, ``City's racial tension endures,'' provides the radicals with encouragement to continue and possibly escalate their views. Wheldon Hair, Harlem

Bipartisan flag victory
South Carolina took a giant step Wednesday night to end the long, divisive nightmare over what to do about the Confederate battle flag. The House, in a highly laudatory 63-56 vote, approved the Senate-passed compromise to take the flag down from the Statehouse dome and fly a similar banner at the monument to Confederate soldiers on the Statehouse grounds.

Lynx eliminated and so is coverage
For the most part I always enjoy The Chronicle's sports section. I am an avid fan of our Augusta Lynx hockey team and of minor league hockey. Ray Zabetta, Evans

Harbin's newsletter called 'incomplete'
I just received in the mail state Rep. Ben Harbin's legislative newsletter for the 2000 session. Walt Sansot, Martinez

Chronicle editorials 'move left'
It didn't take long for the new editorial staff of this paper to show its liberal colors. They moved to the left with editorials calling for compromise on the flag and then they couldn't wait to kick young John Rocker when they thought he was down. Milton Gresham, Evans

Why not decommission both dams?
If the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers does do away with the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam and opens the river for fish to move upstream, then the corps should do the same for the Augusta diversion dam at the headgates to the Augusta Canal. Ron Swank, Blythe

Stewart's growing weary of limelight

Prices go up for Masters practice rounds

Tragedy touches Petty family again

Grief evident in Adam Petty's hometown

Overtime

Summer all-star rosters released

Track meet slated for Saturday

Moraetes gets shot at title

Landmark on way to fifth straight state title

Barksdale named basketball coach at Aiken

Richmond boys aim for state crown

Bluegills join the spawning ranks

Wingates sell Lunker Lodge on Lake Seminole

Intel expands ''streaming media'' business
NEW YORK -- Intel Corp. is investing $200 million in a new business to help Web sites meet demand for audio and video programming from a growing number of Internet users with speedy cable and DSL connections.

Just click on Mother's Day
Joshua Rexford, calling himself ``number one son,'' put his Mother's Day sentiment this way on the Internet:

E-books biz booming, and netLibrary wants to stay on top
Suddenly, the market for providing digitized books, or e-books, is getting as crowded as your local bookstore on a weekend. And Boulder, Colo.-based netLibrary is adapting to ensure it remains a top title in the industry.

Study may have accidentally infected participants
Scientists may have accidentally given hundreds of Chinese research participants the very bacterial infections they were trying to prevent during a 1994 study funded and planned by the National Cancer Institute.

SRS sales raise ire of senator
The results of a federal inspection into the sale of surplus Savannah River Site computers has drawn the ire of U.S. Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C.

Endostatin safety tests so far show little results
BOSTON -- Endostatin, a cancer drug discovered by doctors at Children's Hospital in Boston and once touted as a possible cure, has yet to show dramatic benefits after seven months of safety testing.

Coal count alters toxic site report
After years at the top of the list, Richmond County shed its distinction this year as the largest emitter of toxic chemicals among Georgia's 159 counties, according to the newest Toxic Release Inventory.

AOL users have problems logging on because of software problem
WASHINGTON -- Some America Online users were unable to sign on to their Internet accounts Wednesday night because of a software problem that lasted for three hours, a company spokesman said.

Public to be allowed to welcome solstice at Stonehenge
LONDON -- The public will be able to greet the dawn of the millennium's first summer at the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, the first time in 16 years the site has been opened for the summer solstice.

N.C. sea turtle deaths puzzle scientists
More than 200 dead sea turtles have washed ashore on North Carolina's Outer Banks beaches in the past week, an unusually high number for such a short period of time.

N.C. sea turtle deaths puzzle scientists
More than 200 dead sea turtles have washed ashore on North Carolina's Outer Banks beaches in the past week, an unusually high number for such a short period of time.

Maine Public Broadcasting member list hacked
LEWISTON, Maine -- A hacker broke into the computer file that holds the names, phone numbers, addresses and credit card numbers of Maine Public Broadcasting Corp.'s 21,000 members.

Drug companies to slash prices for AIDS drugs to Africa
GENEVA -- Five major pharmaceutical companies agreed jointly today to slash the cost of drugs for treating AIDS in Africa and other developing countries, the United Nations announced.

Five major drug companies offer to slash prices for AIDS drugs to Africa
GENEVA -- Five major pharmaceutical companies agreed jointly today to slash the cost of drugs for treating AIDS in Africa and other developing countries, the United Nations announced.

Prenatal care improves, but racial and ethnic disparities persist
ATLANTA -- White women are twice as likely as black and Hispanic ones to see a doctor in the first few months of pregnancy, a disparity that leads to more health problems for minority mothers and infants, the government reported Thursday.

Childhood pneumonia deaths down 97 percent
When baby boomers' parents were growing up, it wasn't uncommon to see a friend die of pneumonia before age 15. But baby boomers' children are highly unlikely to die of the disease.

Just click on Mother's Day

Coal count alters toxic site report

Public to be allowed to welcome solstice at Stonehenge

Prenatal care improves, but racial and ethnic disparities persist

N.C. sea turtle deaths puzzle scientists

Intel expands "streaming media" business

SRS sales raise ire of senator

Childhood pneumonia deaths down 97 percent

E-books biz booming, and netLibrary wants to stay on top

Maine Public Broadcasting member list hacked

N.C. sea turtle deaths puzzle scientists

Study may have accidentally infected participants

Drug companies to slash prices for AIDS drugs to Africa

AOL users have problems logging on because of software problem

Endostatin safety tests so far show little results