Originally created 05/02/00

Students cite class boredom



Always drink upstream from the herd.

-- Will Rogers

Want a new educational buzzword to add to your vocabulary?

Try "academic disengagement."

This is the technical term researchers give to high school seniors who seem to have trouble focusing, particularly toward the end of their final year.

The phenomenon was described earlier this year in the release of the 34th annual American Freshman survey of more than 260,000 college students.

The survey questioned first-time, full-time college freshmen about their habits and attitudes during their final year of high school.

A record 40 percent of the students said they were "frequently bored" during their final years in high school.

Anyway, at least 35 percent of the college newcomers told researchers they now feel "overwhelmed by all I have to do" -- the highest that response has gotten since 1985.

(Just wait, gang. It gets harder.)

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TAKE A BREAK: Laura sends us some reasons to be thankful.

I'm thankful for the taxes that I pay because it means I am employed.

I'm thankful for the clothes that fit a little too snug because it means I have enough to eat.

I'm thankful for all the complaining I hear about government because it means we have freedom of speech.

I'm thankful for the lady behind me in church who sings off key because it means I can hear.

I'm thankful for the alarm that goes off in the early morning hours because it means I am alive.

* * * *

ANSWERING MACHINE MESSAGE: "Hi. This is John. If you are the phone company, I already sent the money.

"If you are my parents, please send money. If you are my financial aid institution, you didn't lend me enough money.

"If you are my friends, you owe me money.

"If you are a female, don't worry, I have plenty of money."

* * * *

TODAY'S JOKE: A church had an older man in the choir whose singing voice began to quickly deteriorate.

Several people hinted to him that he could serve in other places, but he continued to come to the choir. The choir director became desperate and went to the pastor.

"You've got to get that man out of the choir," he said. "If you don't, I'm going to resign. And, quite frankly, the choir members say they are going to quit too. Please do something!"

So the pastor went to the man one Sunday afternoon and quietly suggested he retire from singing.

"Why should I?" he asked proudly.

"Well," the preacher said gently, "five or six people have told me you can't sing."

"That's nothing," the man snorted. "At least 50 have told me that you can't preach!"

Reach Bill Kirby at (706) 868-1222, Ext. 107.