Originally created 02/08/00

Rebuts letter about Egyptian dress



With all due respect to Marsha and Thomas Blackstone (letter, Jan. 30), they have their information all wrong. The Blackstones don't know what the dress that I wore, as Shishunk Hotep Re, represents. The headdress of Egypt is the great lion of Judah.

... By their statements it is evi-dent they don't know the Bible, the history of the Bible and its relationship to Egypt. They stated that I have never read the Bible, in particular Genesis 37-50 and Exodus, chapter 1. ... I have read the Bible in its entirety.

The word "slave" is nowhere in the five books of Moses. The first place the word "slave" pops up is in the English translation, but is not found in the Hebrew. Jeremiah 2:14 states: "Is Israel a servant? Is he a home-born slave? Why is he spoiled?" ... The origin of the word slave is Middle English "sclave," from the old French "esclave." ...

You do find the word "slave" in the New Testament in Revelation 18:13, the Greek "somah." The ancient Israelites or Hebrews were not familiar with the New Testament or Greek so the true followers of the Torah or Tanaakh would not even know that word.

They said Moses was raised an Egyptian for 40 years. He was an Egyptian by birth and culture. His name in Egyptian means "child." They said maybe I was supposed to be Moses leading his "people" to the promised land. I have never claimed to be Moses. This is borderline slander. ... That would be blasphemy.

Egyptologists are proving be-yond a shadow of a doubt that pharaohs, such as Rameses II and Shishek could not have possibly been the pharaohs of the Bible. ...

What the Blackstones don't understand is that there was more than one Egypt, as there was more than one Israel. The Egyptians as well as the Israelites were not Caucasoid. Documents given by the Greek Herodotus said, "The Egyptians and Nubians have thick lips, broad noses, wooly hair and burnt skin."

I was wearing my traditional dress as a Tama-rean. It speaks of the greatness of the pyramids and their secrets that my ancestors built.

We must learn to respect each other for what we are; this is the first step to eliminate racism. ... And black children (Egyptians) and white children (Europeans) will walk hand in hand, as we did in that parade. ...

Alexander Smith, Augusta