Hokrein: Copycats crowd tech marketplace
The marketplace is filled with copycats and television is no different. When producers witnessed the success of Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, they salivated at the prospect of developing a hit game show of their own.

Q&A: Think like an entrepreneur
Staff Writer Damon Cline sat down with Sharon Hoffman-Manning, Procter & Gamble plant manager, to discuss the local operation and its impact on the city.

Dirt's no longer cheap
Local restaurateur Jim Heaney would have liked to buy property at Augusta Exchange, the city's hottest retail destination during the past three years.

Antiques craze produces trendy malls
No longer confined to the downtown art district, antique shopping malls are opening throughout the Augusta area to serve eager customers and support dealers looking for a place to sell their wares.

Veteran guides P&G through expansion
Sharon Hoffman-Manning's job performance is put to the test every time a consumer opens a box of Tide. The manager of Procter & Gamble's Augusta powdered soap plant reports to corporate headquarters in Cincinnati, but consumers buying the company's laundry detergents are her ultimate judges.

Businesses utilize public records
Lee Neel is looking for some local warehouse space, and one of the first places he visits is the tax assessor's office. For a few dollars, he's able to get a wealth of information, he says.

Augusta Business Chronicle
Find out why hot commercial property in Augusta is going fast. Learn how Proctor & Gamble's local chief presides over the company's expansion. Read the Augusta Business Chronicle online or get the print edition in Monday's Augusta Chronicle.

Brannen: Employers must recruit creatively
This is a continuation of last month's column about coping with a tight labor market.

Program offers houses for half price
Richmond County Sheriff's Department Investigator Darryl Hamilton has always dreamed of owning his own home. When he found a program where he could buy a $78,000 home for $39,000, that dream became a reality.

Brauer: Law of supply and demand holds
In a special new year's edition (Saturday, Jan. 1, 2000, p. R31), The Wall Street Journal titled one of its articles ``So Long, Supply and Demand.'' Subtitle: ``There's a new economy out there -- and it looks nothing like the old one

Secret shoppers help businesses
It's no secret, mystery shoppers are becoming a fixture in most retail businesses. Banks. Restaurants. Department stores.

Briefcase
New hires are more likely to stay at a job when recruited through inside sources, instead of through ads or employment agencies, studies show. Researchers at Ohio State University reanalyzed data from 28 studies involving nearly 39,000 employees to see what types of recruitment sources are most likely to yield long-term workers.

Businesses utilize public records
Lee Neel is looking for some local warehouse space, and one of the first places he visits is the tax assessor's office. For a few dollars, he's able to get a wealth of information, he says.

Packaging key to high sales
In the marketing world, it's not just the product that sells. It's also the package.

Readers offer relief for digits

Veteran guides P&G through expansion

Businesses utilize public records

Lincolnton named a 'better hometown'

Businesses utilize public records

Hokrein: Copycats crowd tech marketplace

Augusta Business Chronicle

Fair will expose students to jobs

Brauer: Law of supply and demand holds

Business briefs: Nasdaq continues to surpass record

Briefcase

Fair will expose students to jobs
The Employer Expo, an annual career fair at Augusta State University, will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 18. The free event is for the university's students and alumni.

Q&A: Think like an entrepreneur

Lincolnton named a 'better hometown'
In the wake of the chicken plant fire that left 5 percent of Lincoln County workers unemployed, Lincolnton officials are aggressively trying to improve economic conditions.

Packaging key to high sales

Business briefs: Nasdaq continues to surpass record
NEW YORK -- Stocks diverged in familiar fashion Monday, with technology shares leading the Nasdaq composite index higher for a sixth straight session while blue-chip industrials slumped.

Brannen: Employers must recruit creatively

Dirt's no longer cheap

Secret shoppers help businesses

Program offers houses for half price

Upcoming games crucial in race for SEC East

Charleston tops The Citadel

Terrapins rally to beat Wolfpack

'Heels trounce Tigers

Paine Lions take road win

Defense sparks Lady Bulldogs' win

Rizzotti signs deal to coach Hartford

Buckeyes rout Wolverines

Rutgers routs Syracuse, wins fourth straight

Seton Hall ends Syracuse's 19-game streak

Defeat hate crime bill

Hits 'outside' voices on flag issue

Explains selection of '10 Cities'

Blasts governor's stand on flag issue

Raps `emblem of slavery' argument

Rebuts letter about Egyptian dress

Says she was taught to respect others

Urges opponents to local legislators

Thinks letter praising Clinton is gag

Stick to Constitution!

Says Congress is `lawless' group

Complains of neighborhood traffic

Peacekeeping flop

Lists reasons young voters 'tuned out'

Rips offensive `Boondocks' comic

Slams S.C. Democratic Party chief

Wants city to readdress train issue

In the know
Clairol hair-color company, maker of Nice 'n Easy products, is searching for real women to enter its second Be on the Box contest. Three grand-prize winners will receive a three-day, two-night trip to New York for two, where they will be photographed for an upcoming print advertisement for Nice 'n Easy.

Ski Science
Science has come to the slopes. After decades of skis with sides ruled by parallel lines, ski manufacturers have turned to a shape familiar to algebra students -- the parabola.

Sports left behind in TV news

Woods wins sixth straight, sets tourney record

Comeback unavailable to local viewers

Gogel, Brooks in the lead with Tiger lurking

Lakeside girls, Evans boys take region play-in wins

High school scores

Spartans sweep Round 1

NHL retires Gretzky's No. 99

NHL now a league of many nations

NHL All-Star rating is the same

Oh, brother: Bures lead World Stars

BC Eagles blank Northeastern

Messier says league should alter format

Hockey in the homeland hears footsteps

Lynx rebound for much-needed win

NHL retires Gretzky's No. 99

Oh, brother: Bures lead World Stars

Readers offer relief for digits
Forget politics. Don't worry about the weather. What most people seem to want to know about these days is how to fix those painfully cracked finger tips so common this time of year.

Presiden't budget sent to Congress
Highlights of the 2001 budget that President Clinton sent to Congress today: SPENDING -- The president's $1.84 trillion proposal would be 2.5 percent more than the $1.79 trillion to be spent this year. TAXES -- Clinton would cut taxes by $351 billion over 10 years, largely for low- and middle-income Americans. It includes establishment of government-subsidized retirement savings accounts; alleviation of the ``marriage penalty'' that forces many married couples to pay higher taxes; expanding the earned-income tax credit for the working poor; a deduction for up to $10,000 in college expenses; and a $3,000 tax credit for long-term health care. To defray the cost, he would raise other levies by $100 billion, including a 25-cent-a-pack boost in cigarette taxes. Full story -- The Augusta Chronicle

Ski Science

In the know

Family moves because of club

Witness says one shooting based on race
AIKEN -- As he lay in a hospital with a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, David Mark Hill muttered a blunt answer when asked by an investigator why he killed Social Services caseworker Josie Curry:

Grab your partner
Conor Rodman (from left), Joanne Stomer, Tyler Ellis and April Sheeks square dance during a production of Stone Soup at Blue Ridge Elementary. Pupils performed the play in the morning and at the PTO meeting.

Officials push to keep public from resevoir

Teachers fight bill to remove tenure

Sports left behind in TV news

Committee to take up midyear spending bill

Olin to pay environmental fines

Sludge raises concerns
The city of Augusta wants to add 558 acres of Jefferson County hayfields to the list of sites eligible to receive sewage sludge from the Messerly Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Rail-line supporters urge Barnes to commit

School backs out of probe with county
ATHENS, Ga. -- Two months after vowing to unite in an independent investigation into what caused Sanford Stadium's field to become saturated with foul-smelling liquid last August, Athens-Clarke County and the University of Georgia have parted ways in the matter.

Witness says one shooting based on race

Barnes presents child advocate legislation

Opening statements to begin in Hill trial

Barnwell man charged with running chop shop
BARNWELL, S.C. -- A Barnwell County man has been charged with operating a chop shop out of his auto-body business.

Family moves because of club
EDGEFIELD, S.C. -- After battling the booming bass coming from next door for more than two months, Leigh and Todd Coughenhour decided to run up the white flag.

Across the area: GBI crime lab takes unidentified body
The body of a man found Sunday behind Golden Harvest Food Bank remained unidentified Monday evening and was sent to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation crime lab in Atlanta for further identification.

Death on the highway
Harlem-Grovetown Road is a treacherous 6 1/2 -mile ribbon of asphalt twisting and winding between the two cities.

Projects cannot fit in budget
A proposed $130 million increase in Savannah River Site's budget still wouldn't be enough to fund a handful of important programs in fiscal year 2001, the site's chief financial officer said Monday.

DSS shooting trial begins today
Opening statements get under way today in the death penalty trial of David Mark Hill, nearly 3 1/2 years after three Department of Social Service caseworkers were gunned down in their offices.

Educators cite ills in classrooms
The answer to a question raised by an Augusta State University fraternity is yes, area educators say. But exactly how to solve the problem and who's to blame can't be easily answered.

Foreign students learn of Augustans' customs
The past six months have been a learning -- and teaching -- experience for a few Augusta students with origins in very different places.

Marshal: Candle led to dorm fire
CLEMSON, S.C. -- A fire that gutted a Clemson University dorm room this past weekend was caused by a candle, the school's fire marshal says.

Opening statements to begin in Hill trial
Opening statements get under way today in the death penalty trial of David Mark Hill, nearly 3 1/2 years after three Department of Social Service caseworkers were gunned down in their offices.

Memoir chronicles Georgia hero's wartime journey
JEFFERSON, Ga. -- Life is changing fast for Damon Gause.

Barnwell man charged with running chop shop

Senators criticize McCain on tax plan

Union wants worker back on job

Grab your partner

Memoir chronicles Georgia hero's wartime journey

Council reviews 20-year deals

License lets spa re-open

Educators cite ills in classrooms

Across the area: McCain will begin 3-day election trip
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Republican presidential candidate U.S. Senator John McCain will speak in North Augusta on Tuesday to kick off a three-day campaign in the Palmetto State.

Across the area: GBI crime lab takes unidentified body

Artist reflects on childhood, world travels
More than a hundred people sat enchanted at the Morris Museum of Art Sunday, as they listened to Plainview, Ga., native and nationally recognized artist Benny Andrews.

Projects cannot fit in budget

Barnes presents child advocate legislation
ATLANTA -- Gov. Roy Barnes unveiled legislation Monday to create an independent office to act as a watchdog over Georgia's child protection agency, wracked in recent months by reports of deaths of children under its supervision.

Band's director charged

License lets spa re-open
Some of the first customers to visit Sun Cha McZorn's new business could be undercover vice officers.

Council reviews 20-year deals
The North Augusta City Council soon will consider entering 20-year franchise agreements with local electric companies.

Committee to take up midyear spending bill
ATLANTA -- The first of the two annual tussles over state spending should begin in earnest this week in the Georgia General Assembly.

Elections chief calls it quits
AIKEN -- After much deliberation and with a heavy heart, long-time Aiken City Election Commissioner H.A. ``Mac'' McClearen turned in his resignation Monday.

Artist reflects on childhood, world travels

Sludge raises concerns

Teachers fight bill to remove tenure
ATLANTA -- The tone of discussion on education reform is rising in pitch after hundreds of teachers took a day off from work Monday to lobby legislators against Gov. Roy Barnes' proposal to end tenure for new teachers.

Band's director charged
A North Augusta High School band director was taken into police custody Monday after an investigation into a fund-raising scandal.

School backs out of probe with county

Past-due bill policy reviewed
CLEARWATER -- The Clearwater Water District has only 248 customers, and of that small number, only three are more than a month overdue in paying their bills.

Death on the highway

Union wants worker back on job
AIKEN -- Gary McClain's union wants a federal court to make Tenneco Packaging let him work while labor regulators decide whether he was arrested and put in a mental hospital to crush unionizing efforts at the Beech Island plastics plant.

Across the area: McCain will begin 3-day election trip

Senators criticize McCain on tax plan
U.S. Sens. Paul Coverdell and Phil Gramm hammered colleague John McCain on Monday as a supporter of big taxes and big government as they stumped for Texas Gov. George W. Bush.

DSS shooting trial begins today

Officials push to keep public from resevoir
Georgia environmental officials want the city to close Augusta's raw-water reservoir at Highland Avenue to the public. Utilities Director Max Hicks has asked city commissioners to limit access by March 15.

Marshal: Candle led to dorm fire

Olin to pay environmental fines
Olin Chemical's Augusta plant will pay $46,500 in fines for environmental violations involving the failure to submit proper documentation for how it disposes of certain hazardous wastes.

Elections chief calls it quits

Pupil brings pistol to school
AIKEN -- A special education pupil has been charged with bringing a gun to Kennedy Middle School on Monday.

Rail-line supporters urge Barnes to commit
ATLANTA -- Supporters of passenger rail service aren't sitting still for what they believe is the short shrift Gov. Roy Barnes is giving to what they consider a priority.

Iverson's point: 50 ways to lose your critics

Ewing's season-high 25 leads Knicks over Heat

Nets beat Warriors, snap streak

Orlando Arena gets corporate tag

Hornets show Knicks no mercy

Iverson scores 50 in Sixers' win

Lawyer says men in car exonerate Lewis

Moss, Alstott carry NFC to victory

Shula joins Dolphins as QB coach

Deion is ready to leave Cowboys

Mr. Charles Williams
AIKEN -- Mr. Charles Williams, 85, of Monetta Street, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mrs. Edwina Grant
Mrs. Edwina O. Grant, of Chaucer Drive, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at Doctors Hospital.

Mrs. Wynell Scofield
Mrs. Wynell D. Scofield, 83, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Vondell Boyd
BURNETTOWN -- Mrs. Vondell ``Bonnie'' Grimes Boyd, 73, of Duncan Road, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, in Graniteville.

Mr. Elmer Bodiford
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mr. Elmer Cecil Bodiford, 78, of Thornwood Drive, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mrs. Sin Cheung
Mrs. Sin Tao Leung Cheung, 99, of Martinez, died Friday, Feb. 4, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mr. Elijah Parker
Mr. Elijah Parker, of Orange Street, died Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Sue Steinberg
Mrs. Sue K. Steinberg, 65, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at her residence.

Mrs. Annie Farmer
Mrs. Annie Lou Doggett Farmer, 86, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at Doctors Hospital.

Mr. William East
GROVETOWN -- Mr. William Edward East, 64, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Howard Andrews
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- Mr. Howard R. Andrews, 82, died Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000, at his residence.

Mrs. Marjorie Johnson
Mrs. Marjorie J. Johnson, 73, of Brighton Circle, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at Doctors Hospital.

Mrs. Rosa Jordan
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Mrs. Rosa Queen Jordan, 80, of East Church Street, died Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000, at Washington County Regional Medical Center.

Mrs. Nellie Campbell
JACKSON -- Mrs. Nellie Dyer Campbell, 92, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, in Fort Myers, Fla.

Mr. Alexander McIntosh Jr.
MIDVILLE, Ga. -- Mr. Alexander McIntosh Jr., 52, of Maple Lane Apartments, died Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Juanita Adams
BATH -- Mrs. Juanita Watson Adams, 71, of Cathy Drive, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at her residence.

Miss Helen Jordan
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Miss Helen Jordan, 87, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at Washington Regional Medical Center.

Mr. Raymond Odum III
DEARING -- Mr. Raymond ``Fats'' Odum III, 60, of McCorkle Road, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Cathy Andrews
Mrs. Cathy ``Moma'' Dowdy Andrews, 48, of Evans, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mr. Paul Miller
EDGEFIELD, S.C. -- Mr. Paul L. Miller, 34, of Beaverdam Street, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at Edgefield County Hospital.

Mr. Meyer Weinstein
GREENSBORO, Ga. -- Mr. Meyer David ``Mike'' Weinstein, 88, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Alexander Marshall
AIKEN -- Mr. Alexander Marshall, of Edgefield Highway, died Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mrs. Patricia McCracken
EDISTO BEACH, S.C. -- Mrs. Patricia Joy Crabb McCracken, 70, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, in Charleston.

Miss Angela Raines
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Miss Angela Cameron Raines, 24, of Woodbine Drive, died Monday, Feb. 7, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Earl Mitchell
SPARTA, Ga. -- Mr. Earl Mitchell, 70, of Route 2, died Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2000, at Hancock Memorial Hospital.

Mrs. Amanda Crane
Mrs. Amanda ``Mandy'' Crane, 53, of Floyd Street, died Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000, at University Hospital.

Miss Estelle Stribling
MACON -- Miss Estelle Stribling, 91, died Monday, Feb. 7, 2000, in Fort Valley.

Miss Martha McCracken
SYLVANIA, Ga. -- Miss Martha Washington McCracken, 83, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at Sylview Nursing Home.

Mr. Johnny Olliff
STATESBORO, Ga. -- Mr. Johnny R. Olliff, 64, died Monday, Feb. 7, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. D'non Clark
BLYTHE -- Mr. D'non Phillip Clark, 26, of Etterlee Drive, died Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2000.

Mrs. Frances Bell
MARIETTA, Ga. -- Mrs. Frances Riley Bell, 82, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000.

Mr. Earl Blevins III
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mr. Earl W. ``Trey'' Blevins III, 27, of Audubon Road, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Elijah Parker
Mr. Elijah Parker, of Orange Street, died Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mr. Stephen Roberson
AIKEN -- Mr. Stephen H. Roberson, 72, of Jehossee Drive, died Saturday, Feb. 5, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Vinson Martin Jr.
Mr. Vinson A. Martin Jr., 59, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Harry Walker Jr.
Mr. Harry Hammond ``Ham'' Walker Jr., 81, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at Doctors Hospital.

Mr. Robert Dyer
Mr. Robert W. ``Bob'' Dyer, 54, died Sunday, Feb. 6, 2000, at St. Joseph Hospital.

Mrs. Lucy Johnson
Mrs. Lucy Burton Johnson, of Ninth Avenue, died Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mr. Paul Benton
AIKEN -- Mr. Paul Benton, 69, of Horry Street, died Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

Mr. Howard Andrews

Mr. Elmer Bodiford

Miss Estelle Stribling

Mrs. Wynell Scofield

Miss Helen Jordan

Mr. Johnny Olliff

Mrs. Patricia McCracken

Mr. Paul Benton

Mr. Elijah Parker

Mr. Alexander Marshall

Mrs. Frances Bell

Mrs. Edwina Grant

Miss Martha McCracken

Mrs. Vondell Boyd

Mr. Charles Williams

Mr. Paul Miller

Mr. Earl Mitchell

Mrs. Sin Cheung

Mrs. Annie Farmer

Mr. William East

Mr. Meyer Weinstein

Mr. Raymond Odum III

Mr. Vinson Martin Jr.

Mr. Harry Walker Jr.

Mrs. Nellie Campbell

Mrs. Juanita Adams

Miss Angela Raines

Mrs. Cathy Andrews

Mrs. Lucy Johnson

Mrs. Rosa Jordan

Mrs. Amanda Crane

Barnes' education reform focuses on the wrong issues
Gov. Roy Barnes' education reform initiative focuses on the wrong issuesTopics of debate should be maintaining due process rights, enhancing curriculum rigor and improving teacher effectiveness

Confederate flag part of our history; shouldn't we honor both sides?
I TOOK MY children recently to a national historic site -- a pleasant experience, for the most part, spoiled only by the sight of the Stars and Stripes waving defiantly from a nearby flagpole. The American flag may mean some things to some people -- history, heritage, the Constitution, veterans' sacrifice -- but to many it must conjure up a series of indelible, and distasteful, images.

Hillary's song
What's the problem? It was the perfect theme song. Why the long faces and embarrassed apologies from Hillary Clinton's New York Senate staff when her candidacy announcement was preceded by blaring music that turned out to be Billy Joel's raunchy Captain Jack?

Thinks letter praising Clinton is gag
Re the Jan. 18 letter by E. Maner, ``Praises president as greatest of century'': Tom Hamorsky, Millen

Says she was taught to respect others
Re Paul and Anne Cook's Feb. 1 letter: I've lived in Georgia for all of my 52 years. I was raised in a small town in north Georgia and I was taught to treat all of my elders with respect, regardless of their color. Even my parents and grandparents used respect toward everyone. Mabel Chambers, Grovetown

Lists reasons young voters 'tuned out'
The Chronicle had an editorial lamenting about why the younger voters were ``turned off'' and ``tuned out.'' You were referring to local politics. It is easy to see why, after seeing the ``scandals'' committed by the Augusta city government. Carl S. Champlin, Aiken

Slams S.C. Democratic Party chief
Who does Dick Harpootlian think he's kidding? Anthony P. Gouge, Aiken

104 new programs
President Clinton's State of the Union speech was rightly criticized for being rife with costly new Big Government proposals, but just how plentiful and expensive those proposals are wasn't made explicit until the Cato Institute and the National Taxpayers Union got out their adding machines over the past few days and toted them up.

Defeat hate crime bill
Pushed by the Senate leadership, including Majority Leader Charles Walker, D-Augusta, and Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor, hate crime is holding center stage in the Georgia Legislature this week.

Raps `emblem of slavery' argument
I've been a student of the War Between the States for the last 40 years, and I have never seen or heard of an ``Emblem of Slavery.'' I have not been able to find the word ``slavery'' mentioned anywhere in the regulations governing either of the flags that represented the Confederate government. The flags' appearance were changed for a reason, but again there is no mention of slavery. H. Meads, Lincolnton

Rips offensive `Boondocks' comic
Re the cartoon strip ``The Boondocks'' for Jan. 31: Margaret White, Augusta

Wants city to readdress train issue
As a whole, I think our elected officials and public workers have done a wonderful job maintaining and remolding our city of Augusta. But what happened to the idea of reducing the number of railroad boxcars that run through Augusta? This still is a problem with traffic backing up, especially for emergency vehicles such as ambulances, fire engines and law enforcement. Henry Hogan, Augusta

Rebuts letter about Egyptian dress
With all due respect to Marsha and Thomas Blackstone (letter, Jan. 30), they have their information all wrong. The Blackstones don't know what the dress that I wore, as Shishunk Hotep Re, represents. The headdress of Egypt is the great lion of Judah. Alexander Smith, Augusta

Says Congress is `lawless' group
Surfing down the ``information highway'' of satellites and optic cables, an amazing amount of information is available about dubious organizations and corporate welfare. Putting together the bits and pieces, a mosaic of lawlessness and immorality comes to light! Al Kotras, Augusta

Urges opponents to local legislators
I commend Ron Beul for his opposition to the Columbia County government expansion (letter, Jan. 18), wherein our legislative delegation consisting of Rep. Ben Harbin, R-Martinez, Rep. Bill Jackson, R-Appling, and Sen. Joey Brush, R-Appling, would add an elected mayor/CEO to the existing structure of five commissioners. This scheme accomplishes nothing except an increase of cost to the taxpayers and the attendant delays in getting something done. You don't have to look too far to see how a multi-layered government fails to represent its citizens! Richard J. Killien, Evans

Hits `federal bashers' over dam flap
It's interesting to watch professed federal bashers -- notably The Chronicle and area politicians -- try to make a case for the federal government to continue to pay for maintaining the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam and its ``lake.'' These are the same folks who miss no opportunity to argue for local control where no money must come from local sources. This isn't even a case for the state governments in Atlanta and Columbia. It impacts only those fronting on a short section of the Savannah River. Victor Reilly, Aiken

Peacekeeping flop
It's one thing to be told through the national media about the failures of United Nations peacekeeping missions, like that in Kosovo, and quite another when someone you know and has been a part of the action says the same thing. It drives the point home in a way that all the pundits and TV talking heads cannot.

Confederate flag part of our history; shouldn't we honor both sides?
I TOOK MY children recently to a national historic site -- a pleasant experience, for the most part, spoiled only by the sight of the Stars and Stripes waving defiantly from a nearby flagpole. The American flag may mean some things to some people -- history, heritage, the Constitution, veterans' sacrifice -- but to many it must conjure up a series of indelible, and distasteful, images.

Hits 'outside' voices on flag issue
I would like to point out that 75 percent of the people who showed up at the South Carolina anti-Confederate flag party in Columbia were from out of state and have no voice in the laws that make up South Carolina. ... Joe Nirenberg, Beech Island

Asks if Communist 'really so bad'
With all the negative talk about Cuba lately in the news, I feel the need to ask a few questions. Coco Rubio, Augusta

Complains of neighborhood traffic
Recently when I was driving close to my neighborhood, I saw a thick plume of black smoke above the trees in the direction of my home. I started toward the house, but never made it home. What I found was my neighbors' car -- demolished, and engulfed in flames -- in the middle of an intersection. She was still in the car. Lester Williams, Augusta

Stick to Constitution!
Oklahoma U.S. Sen. James Inhofe is leading a band of nearly 20 Republicans who are planning to block all of President Clinton's judicial nominations until his term is up. Naturally, the senator is drawing heavy fire from all the usual suspects.

Explains selection of '10 Cities'
The Georgia Municipal Association is pleased to join this newspaper in congratulating the city of Thomson for being named one of Georgia's ``10 Cities of Excellence.'' (``Cities of excellence,'' Feb. 2) James A. Calvin, Atlanta

Blasts governor's stand on flag issue
I wrote to South Carolina Gov. Jim Hodges last October to express my support to continue to flythe Confederate Naval Jack above the Statehouse in memory of those who honorably and bravely fought and died in the War of Northern Aggression. In the governor's reply he stated, ``I believe that little progress can be made at this time on this issue,'' and he wanted to channel all efforts into improving education. In his State of the State address he now says he wants the flag removed and the children of South Carolina are watching. John O. Ghann, Augusta

Barnes' education reform focuses on the wrong issues
Gov. Roy Barnes' education reform initiative focuses on the wrong issuesTopics of debate should be maintaining due process rights, enhancing curriculum rigor and improving teacher effectiveness

Options grow for women in soccer

Gunners win U-19 division in Shootout

U.S. women fall to Norway

Lawyer says men in car exonerate Lewis

Smokin' Joe's daughter wins pro debut

Woodruff, Agassi make McEnroe's day in Davis Cup

New USOC leader begins overhaul

Judge agrees: Lewis doesn't have to fight Akinwande

Overtime: Thurmond's Hillary to sign with Catawba

Overtime: Wilkerson takes title in Silver Gloves

Relatives of air bag victims want to keep warning labels
WASHINGTON -- Parents of children killed by air bags lobbied the government Monday to keep strongly worded warning labels that say the safety devices can kill young children riding in the front seat.

Researchers use DNA chips to identify cancer types
Scientists say they can more precisely diagnose cancers with a new technology that uses computers to rapidly monitor the activity of thousands of genes in cancer cells.

Internet downloads help toys grow
NEW YORK -- Parents long have complained that kids quickly lose interest in their toys. But that may change with the introduction of toys that use the Web to add new games and activities.

Boston hospital suspends gene therapy trials
BOSTON -- A Boston medical center has suspended its gene therapy tests because of safety concerns arising from a student's death last year in a similar trial program in Pennsylvania

New York planetarium offers virtual tour of universe
NEW YORK -- When the new Hayden Planetarium opens to the public Feb. 19, it will not only show kids the heavens but take them there, too.

Yahoo! suffers breakdown
WASHINGTON -- Yahoo! Inc., which runs the most popular site on the Internet, suffered technical problems Monday and its flagship Web directory was inaccessible for much of the day.

Black cable network launches Web site
NEW YORK -- An Internet site devoted to the lifestyles and culture of black Americans debuts this week as part of an effort to make the online experience less of a ``World White Web.''

Study: Learning problems for preemies continue in adolescence
CHICAGO -- Children born extremely prematurely, weighing 2 pounds or less at birth, experience significant learning difficulties that persist into their teen-age years, a study found.

Federal budget available online
WASHINGTON -- Dedicated number crunchers can read the federal budget online.

Virus testing helps doctors pick most effective treatment
SAN FRANCISCO -- Doctors say they can improve the chance of successfully treating AIDS by measuring how each patient's virus stands up to the drugs intended to kill HIV.

Your style

Your style
Rashenah Walker, 16, a junior at Davidson Fine Arts High School.

When is it really love?
People may think it's only puppy love, but for many teens falling in love is the real deal.

Real love means not demanding sex

Inventive plot and good acting lead to laughs

Real love means not demanding sex
``I've been going out with this boy for three months, and he's pressuring me to have sex. I really love him and everything, but I'm not sure I'm ready to have sex. Should I or shouldn't I?'' -- 15-year-old Hephzibah girl

Inventive plot and good acting lead to laughs
A group of actors from a science fiction show named Galaxy Quest are recruited by some friendly aliens to help defeat their arch-nemesis. The aliens think the cast is really a group of space rangers.

When is it really love?

Federal budget available online

Researchers use DNA chips to identify cancer types

Virus testing helps doctors pick most effective treatment

Study: Learning problems for preemies continue in adolescence

Internet downloads help toys grow

New York planetarium offers virtual tour of universe