Gender of computers is debatable

Augusta banks see increases
Two community banks reported big income growth during 1999, another indicator small banks continue building momentum in the Augusta market.

Bank fees aid bottom line
Now that he's retired, ex-banker Monty Osteen grumbles about paying service fees to the bank. Last year, he complained to fellow officers of the nonprofit urban development organization, Greater Augusta Progress, that the group didn't have enough money in its account to meet the fee-exempt threshold.

Business briefs: Stocks close lower in technology selloff

Defense service company to be based in Aiken
AIKEN -- Westinghouse Government Services Co. is expected to announce Friday that it will locate its executive offices in Aiken.

Augusta banks see increases

IRS helping taxpayers file
Joanna Benning of Hephzibah isn't one to procrastinate. Her employer, Medical College of Georgia, distributed W-2 forms Wednesday and by Thursday, she already had filed for ``a little refund'' from the Internal Revenue Service.

Cumulus to replace Disney with ESPN

Jobless rate falls statewide

Business briefs

Bank fees aid bottom line

Cumulus to replace Disney with ESPN
Cumulus Broadcasting is dumping Mickey Mouse and the rest of his gang to stay in the game.

Business briefs: Stocks close lower in technology selloff
NEW YORK -- Stock prices closed mostly lower Wednesday as cautious investors, fearing a pending interest rate increase, fled the technology sector despite strong corporate earnings.

Jobless rate falls statewide
Unemployment rates declined in December throughout Georgia, the state Department of Labor reported Thursday. In Augusta, the rate fell to 4.4 percent from 4.8 percent in November.

Business briefs
NEW YORK -- The Dow Jones industrial average slipped 4.97 points Thursday to close at 11,028.02. Broader stock indicators also gave up early gains and closed lower. The Standard & Poor's 500 fell 5.53, to 1,398.56, and the Nasdaq composite index fell 30.35, to 4,039.56. Trading was heavy.

Defense service company to be based in Aiken

Jaguars top among local teams in index

Jackets have no answer for Wake in loss

Clemson routs Wolfpack

Coleman, Bulldogs fall to Kentucky

Gerk helps lead Lady Pacers

Mottola's long road leads him to No. 19 Utah

UNC ends losing streak

Purdue's penalties are upheld

Aiken Tech topples Warriors

Gamecocks fall to Vandy in final seconds

Louisville braces for Cincinatti

Jaguars cruise to easy win

Homeless foul-up

Backs decommissioning lock and dam

Seeks law on car cell phone use

Slams support of 'morning after pill'

Welcomes 'biodegradable plastics'

H.B. 1187: be careful

Slams remarks as 'Christian arrogance'

A new president

New SRS suit twist

Calls mifepristone an abortifacient

Pay off U.S. debt!

Ruminates the Elian Gonzales case

Seeks visionary leaders in river flap

Fears local drinking water endangered

Hanging baskets can be saved
Remember how beautiful your ferns and other plants in hanging baskets looked on the patio this summer? What do they look like now?

Rock changed American landscape
Rock has always been a political statement. The sound of the electric guitar and the 1-2-3-4 beat of a snare drum have, since the early 1950s, been the marching music for teen-age rebellion.

`Mikado' performance begins stiffly but loosens up
It was a little like thawing frozen chicken in the microwave Wednesday night as the Augusta Opera's production of The Mikado opened in the Imperial Theatre. For much of the first act the audien

Coping with cancer
Tom Blest, 63, stands up from his folding chair and levels with the rest of the group. ``I have a million questions,'' he tells the Augusta chapter of the US TOO Prostate Cancer Survivor Support Group. Since he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in September, he has seen ``a million pages'' of information on the Internet and an abundance of articles clipped out by his wife. Fists stuffed in the pockets of his jacket, he turns nervously from side to side. ``Give me a hand on this, guys.''

'Nightingale' suited for young audience
One of the things about a Hans Christian Andersen tale is that there is a lesson to be learned -- usually a life lesson -- to carry with us on our journey. While the language is stilted, we accept this as part of the formality of the lesson itself, and through the formal prose and dialogue we build images of the characters in the story.

In the know
On Tuesday, The Chronicle asked readers to vote for the celebrity they would like to see as substitute host of The Late Show With David Letterman while Mr. Letterman is recovering from heart surgery.

Albums recapture sounds of Clash and Jam
In its heyday, it was called ``the only band that matters.'' Known for wearing their political hearts on their sleeves, the members of Clash today are recognized more for their musical calls for revolution than for their acumen as songwriters and performers.

Comedian's humor never gritty
Don't call James Gregory a Southern comedian. Although born and raised in the Georgia hamlet of Lithonia and with a comic delivery marked by a distinct drawl, Mr. Gregory says his humor is universal.

Bluegrass musician joins cast of Opry
The Grand Ole Opry started 2000 by inducting a grand ole bluegrass entertainer as its newest member.

Capsules
Your brain had caller ID long before your telephone did. Scientists have discovered that the human brain has special areas that can tell the difference between human voices and other noises. These areas may help people know the identity and mood of the speaker.

Students dance for a purpose
A blur of motion streaks across the field of vision. Colored tights and leotards spin quietly across the tiled floor. There is no music; the only rhythm is provided by the padding of bare feet against the floor. Young faces stare forward, watching every move in the room's mirrored wall, and Ferneasa Cutno quietly notes each person's strengths and weaknesses.

Exhibit highlights two artists
For William Halsey and Philip Morsberger, success came not because they embraced the expectations of the art world, but rather because they rejected them.

Dead trees enliven landscape
Good news for anyone whose tree has been killed by lightening, drought, construction damage or burrowing beetles: It may be safe to leave it in the landscape. It probably won't fall sideways, anyway. More likely, it'll come straight down, a limb at a time, over many months and years.

Growing seedlings from scratch
After weeks of bare trees and brown grass, many gardeners are itching to get busy growing again.

Sports council lands another bass tournament

Fishing tournament information

Augusta veteran nears 1st win

Talent-rich field rides into finals

Shepard captures Open semis

Rapp in tune again in Classic Non-Pro

Rapp survives tough draw

Blanco will give exhibition

Alabama cutter sweeps events

Court OKs lawsuit from golfer injured by 'mulligan'

Mickelson, Lehman tied for Phoenix lead

High school scores

Lindros scores goal in first game back

Lindros back after 2-week absence

Flyers acquire minor leaguer from Chicago

Coyotes top Hurricanes

Gender of computers is debatable
What gender is a computer? You know, English doesn't have masculine and feminine forms for words like other languages, so I guess we'd have to guess.

Deadly storm surprised forecasters
Thousands shivered today in stranded cars, waited at airports or dug themselves out from nearly 2 feet of snow as forecasters admitted that the deadly East Coast storm was a nasty surprise. ``We're really cursing those computer models,'' said Andrew Woodcock, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va. ``They had the low (pressure system) way out to sea.'' The storm, however, raced north along the coast Monday and Tuesday, dumping nearly 2 feet of snow in places. Flurries were expected today across parts of the Northeast as the storm system moves out to sea and more delays were expected at major Eastern airports, some of which were shut down Tuesday. Full story -- The Augusta Chronicle

Cold weather tips
Basic cold weather tips: (from Columbia County Community and Emergency Services Director Pam Tucker, Richmond County Emergency Management Agency Director David Dlugolenski, Olson Tire Total Car, Petland at the Augusta Mall and Augusta-Richmond County Extension Coordinator Sid Mullis.) Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing in several layers. Wear a hat and gloves to prevent body heat from escaping. Cover your mouth to protect your lungs from the extreme cold.Full story -- The Augusta Chronicle

Dead trees enliven landscape

In the know

`Mikado' performance begins stiffly but loosens up

Bluegrass musician joins cast of Opry

Capsules

Comedian's humor never gritty

Rock changed American landscape

Growing seedlings from scratch

Albums recapture sounds of Clash and Jam

Hanging baskets can be saved

'Nightingale' suited for young audience

Students dance for a purpose

Exhibit highlights two artists

Coping with cancer

Recipe for fun
Wally Amos' talents extend beyond his famous cookie concoctions.

Correction
In Wednesday's editions of The Augusta Chronicle, Richmond County school board member Adna Stein was misidentified as a woman.

Mental health facility loses youth funds
SAVANNAH -- Children no longer will be able to get mental health and substance abuse services from Tidelands, the area's largest mental health provider. Long-term funding of adult services at Tidelands is also in question.

Chilling out

Chamber awards top honors

Across the area: Woman, 70, dies in two-car crash

ABC to air Aiken man's story

Republicans unveil state ethics reforms

Charter to close Augusta facility

Deadly storm surprised forecasters

Paint maker faces another pollution fine

Chief investigator planning run for sheriff's position

Across the area: Woman, 70, dies in two-car crash
A 70-year-old Martinez woman died of head trauma Wednesday after pulling in front of an oncoming vehicle on River Watch Parkway, according to an officer with the Richmond County traffic unit.

Cold weather tips

Winning Big Game ticket sold in city
If you bought a ticket in Augusta for Tuesday's Big Game drawing, check your numbers.

Protest of Georgia flag planned for Super Bowl

Recipe for fun

Burglars pose as pastors

Teacher testifies at trial

Raise OK'd for substitute teachers
AIKEN -- To attract a larger pool of substitute teachers, the Aiken County Board of Education will raise their pay immediately.

Across the area: Student arrested after knife found

Recruiters lobby everyone when it comes to players

Burglars pose as pastors
Although she doesn't normally let strangers into her house, an 88-year-old Augusta widow said she didn't feel threatened by the two Bible-toting men in jogging suits who barged into her home Monday and made off with her purse.

Chief investigator planning run for sheriff's position
EDGEFIELD, S.C. -- Twenty years after his first attempt to become Edgefield County's sheriff, Chief Investigator Marvin Easler announced Wednesday he will try again.

Veto rules extended to agency
ATLANTA -- The Georgia House overwhelmingly passed legislation Thursday that would allow the General Assembly to override regulations put forth by the state's Environmental Protection Division.

Teacher criticizes education reforms
ATLANTA -- An Augusta kindergarten teacher chosen as the nation's top educator last year used a high-profile platform Wednesday to attack Gov. Roy Barnes' school reform plan.

Paint maker faces another pollution fine
SAVANNAH -- Frustrations over equipment failures have led to a proposed consent order against Kemira Pigments Inc. for releasing too much titanium dioxide dust into the air.

ABC to air Aiken man's story
What happened when an Aiken County man tried to voice support for a union at the Tenneco Packaging plant in Beech Island last July?

Chilling out
Low temperatures and gusty winds didn't stop Will Van Sant and Chris Robert from taking a brisk bike ride along Riverwalk Augusta on Wednesday afternoon. Today's forecast calls partly cloudy skies with a high of 40 and a low of 24.

Change would OK state money for religious charities

Firm to relocate to Aiken
AIKEN -- Westinghouse Government Services Co. is expected to announce Friday that it will locate its executive offices in Aiken.

Man faces charges in felony hit-and-run
A construction worker charged with felony hit-and-run likely will be the only arrest in the death of 53-year-old Sam Bonner, police said Thursday.

Teen testifies at Hephzibah teacher's trial
A Hephzibah High School teacher never acted improperly toward a 17-year-old student until one afternoon last year when he gave her a ride home, the young woman testified Wednesday.

Here we go again

Shelters preparing for storm

Across the area: Student arrested after knife found
A Butler High School student was arrested at school Thursday after a search of his clothes turned up a pocketknife. Charles Sylvester McBeth, 17, was stopped at about 8:45 a.m. by a Richmond County Board of Education safety officer because of the heavy smell of marijuana on his clothes, said Lt. Jack Francisco of the sheriff's department.

Residents not told of list change

Shelters preparing for storm
As a biting chill and unpredictable winter weather threatened, Augusta's homeless shelters prepared Thursday night to protect the indigent from the storm.

County schools may start earlier

Protest of Georgia flag planned for Super Bowl
ATLANTA -- The Rev. Jesse Jackson is calling for the National Football League to make a gesture during Sunday's Super Bowl to demonstrate opposition to the Confederate battle symbol remaining part of the Georgia state flag.

Mental health facility loses youth funds

Republicans unveil state ethics reforms
ATLANTA -- Georgia Senate Republicans unveiled an ethics agenda Wednesday that takes aim at a variety of miscreants, from legislators who solicit campaign contributions during the General Assembly session to ex-lawmakers who lobby their former colleagues.

Winning Big Game ticket sold in city

Firm to relocate to Aiken

Raise OK'd for substitute teachers

Here we go again
Get ready for round two. It's time to battle snow and ice again. The National Weather Service forecast calls for snow today, snow and freezing rain Saturday and rain Sunday, during which temperatures should not climb out of the 30s.

Ex-Tiger running from past

Cutting loose

Correction

Veto rules extended to agency

Hospital to pay for cost-cutting changes
Remaking the lobby into registration central, contracting for laundry services and buying new equipment had University Hospital's board pulling out the checkbook Thursday.

Cutting loose
Contestants wait their turn Thursday afternoon to participate in the Augusta Futurity at Augusta-Richmond County Civic Center.

Residents not told of list change
AIKEN -- Nearly six years ago, Gum Swamp Road, a dirt stretch near Beech Island, was on an Aiken County priority list to be paved.

Chamber awards top honors
AIKEN -- When the Aiken Chamber of Commerce asked for nominations for its Man of the Year, developer Ronny Bolton immediately thought of his friend Joe Babb.

County has 6th traffic death in two weeks
AIKEN -- A man was killed early Thursday when he lost control of his sports utility vehicle on a curve.

Teacher testifies at trial
It simply never happened, Hephzibah High School teacher Alphonza Griffin testified Thursday about the allegation he sexually assaulted a student last year.

Charter to close Augusta facility
Charter still wants its patients to get help somewhere -- just not here.

Teen testifies at Hephzibah teacher's trial

County schools may start earlier
Columbia County schools could get an early start for the 2001-2002 school year. This year classes began Aug. 23, but the calendar for the 2000-2001 school year has the first day of classes set for five days earlier -- Aug. 18.

Teacher criticizes education reforms

Change would OK state money for religious charities
ATLANTA -- House Republicans unveiled a proposed Georgia constitutional amendment Thursday to allow state money to be spent on faith-based charities serving the needy.

Big brother always there for guidance

Salary cap up $5 million for next year

Sanders out, Vincent in for Pro Bowl

Super Bowl XXXIV: Tennessee vs. St. Louis

Vermeil wins NFL Coach of the Year

Notes and Quotes from the Super Bowl

Media glare no big deal for Rams' quarterback

Media glare no big deal for Rams' quarterback

Green announces retirement

Third-quarter Titanium

Warner keys Rams' victory

Commitment behind Rams' rebound

New Orleans announces new college bowl game

Notes and Quotes from the Super Bowl

A 17-year journey to the Super Bowl

Downtown Atlanta brings in big events, but there's little to do

QB followed winding road

t's the Super Bowl, so they have to watch -- don't they?

Census Bureau scores ad coup

Safety, kickoff return changed momentum for Titans

Patriots hire Belichick as coach

A 17-year journey to the Super Bowl

Horne wants to be dangerous on -- but not off -- the field

It's the Super Bowl, so they have to watch -- don't they?

Rams' tackle an uncommon mixture of size, grace

Titans tighten defense

Mrs. Leola Gregory
Mrs. Leola Morgan Gregory, 60, of Lumpkin Road, died Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mr. Jeffrey Bridges
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Mr. Jeffrey Lee ``Tuffy'' Bridges, 22, of Kittrel Creek Road, died Monday, Jan. 24, 2000, at Washington Regional Medical Center.

Mr. John Wood
DEARING -- Mr. John Wood, 89, of Fort Creek Church Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at McDuffie County Hospital.

Ms. Rose Still
AIKEN -- Ms. Rose Shealy Still, 68, died Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mr. James Moss
THOMSON -- Mr. James W. ``Dick'' Moss, 57, of Twin Oaks Road, died Monday, Jan. 24, 2000, at McDuffie Regional Medical Center.

Mrs. Ida White
Mrs. Ida Ruth ``Mert'' White, 75, of Lot Avenue, died Sunday, Jan. 23, 2000, at her residence.

Mrs. Louise Wansley
THOMSON -- Mrs. Louise Gibson Wansley, 75, of Lee Street, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at Windermere Health Care.

Mrs. Emma Davis
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- Mrs. Emma ``Sissy'' Davis, died Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2000, at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Samuel Bonner
Mr. Samuel ``Sam'' Bonner, 53, of Dade Street, died Saturday, Jan. 22, 2000.

Mr. Joseph Hudson
MEEKS, Ga. -- Mr. Joseph Cedric Hudson, 78, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Sol Simpkins
LOUISVILLE, Ga. -- Mr. Sol Simpkins, 71, of Nelms Street, died Monday, Jan. 24, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. William Knowles
Mr. William Anthony ``Tony'' Knowles, 51, died Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Christopher Chastain
HEPHZIBAH -- Mr. Christopher ``Brian'' Chastain, 18, of Turkey Trail Drive, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at Shand's Hospital, Jacksonville, Fla.

Mrs. Dorothy Thackston
GREENSBORO, Ga. -- Mrs. Dorothy Louise Channell Thackston, 62, of Union Point Highway, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at her residence.

Mr. Michael Keenan
Mr. Michael Keenan, 16, of Monte Sano Avenue, died Monday, Jan. 24, 2000.

Mr. Charles Hopkins
Mr. Charles D. Hopkins, 87, of Evans, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at Doctors Hospital.

Albert J. Twiggs II
Mr. Albert Jefferson Twiggs II, of Greenwood, S.C. a city planning consultant and former special consultant to the U.S. State Department, died Saturday, Jan. 22, 2000. Mr. Twiggs died at Self Memorial Hospital in Greenwood. He was 87 years old.

Mrs. Ann Baxter
Mrs. Ann Lamb Baxter died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at her residence.

Mrs. Vinnie Blackburn
STATESBORO, Ga. -- Mrs. Vinnie Morris Blackburn, 83, died Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000, at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah.

Mr. Carl Johnson
Mr. Carl A. Johnson, of Mitchell Street, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center.

Mrs. Everine Jones
WASHINGTON, Ga. -- Mrs. Everine Jones, 83, of Salenist Street, died Monday, Jan. 24, 2000, at Wills Memorial Hospital.

Mrs. Cora Styles
Mrs. Cora B. Styles, of Dublin Drive, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mr. Robert Turner Jr.
Mr. Robert Eugene Turner Jr., of Richmond Hill Road, died Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

Ms. Dorothy Lewis
Ms. Dorothy Holloway Lewis, 43, of London Boulevard, died Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Margaret Sanders
HARLEM -- Mrs. Margaret Shank Sanders, 76, of Leitner Mill Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000.

Mrs. Inez Crawford
Mrs. Inez M. Crawford, 40, of Evans, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at her residence.

Mr. Odell Murray
WRENS, Ga. -- Mr. Odell Murray, 61, Washington Street, died Tuesday, Jan., 25, 2000, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Willie Ervin Sr.
WAYNESBORO, Ga. -- Mr. Willie James Ervin Sr., of Cantebury Circle, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at Burke County Hospital.

Mrs. Annabelle Griffin
PHILADELPHIA -- Mrs. Annabelle Griffin, 79, of Oakford Street, died Saturday, Jan. 22, 2000, at St. Agnes Hospital.

Mr. Erik Hall
AIKEN -- Mr. Erik George Hall, 24, of Governor's Lane, died Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mr. Sid Lee Jr.
MILLEN, Ga. -- Mr. Sid Lee Jr., 46, died Saturday, Jan. 22, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Ed Flournoy
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Mr. Ed Willie Flournoy, 73, died Sunday, Jan. 23, 2000, at Baptist Hospital.

Mrs. Mildred Lloyd
AIKEN -- Mrs. Mildred Lloyd, 64, of Newberry Street, North West, died Sunday, Jan. 23, 2000, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mrs. Iris Abbott
WARRENTON, Ga. -- Mrs. Iris Edenfield Abbott, 88, of Oak Street, died Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000, at McDuffie Regional Hospital, Thomson.

Mrs. Thelma Murray
Mrs. Thelma Murray, 58, of Ridgewood Drive, died Monday, Jan. 24, 2000.

Mrs. Nina Brooks
ATLANTA -- Mrs. Nina Brooks, 87, of Orkney Lane, died Sunday, Jan. 23, 2000, at Grady Hospital.

Mrs. Mary Baxley
Mrs. Mary Frances Evans Baxley, of Evans, died Sunday, Jan. 23, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Claudie Copeland
NUNEZ, Ga. -- Mrs. Claudie Bell Copeland, 75, died Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2000, at Emanuel Medical Center, Swainsboro.

Mrs. Louise Fields
Mrs. Louise B. Fields, 67, of 12th Avenue, died Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000, at St. Joseph Hospital.

Mrs. Leila Barnes
Mrs. Leila G. ``Nuke'' Barnes, 71, of Alder Drive, died Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mrs. Ida White

Mr. Joseph Hudson

Mrs. Margaret Sanders

Mrs. Ann Baxter

Mrs. Mary Baxley

Mrs. Annabelle Griffin

Mr. Ed Flournoy

Mrs. Iris Abbott

Mr. Odell Murray

Mr. Erik Hall

Mr. Samuel Bonner

Mr. Carl Johnson

Mr. Charles Hopkins

Mr. Sid Lee Jr.

Mr. James Moss

Mrs. Leila Barnes

Mrs. Leola Gregory

Mrs. Claudie Copeland

Mr. Michael Keenan

Mrs. Inez Crawford

Mr. John Wood

Mr. Robert Turner Jr.

Mrs. Dorothy Thackston

Mrs. Everine Jones

Mr. Jeffrey Bridges

Mr. Willie Ervin Sr.

Mrs. Mildred Lloyd

Mrs. Vinnie Blackburn

Mrs. Emma Davis

Ms. Rose Still

Mr. William Knowles

Mrs. Cora Styles

Young: Multi-state project should be federally funded
WHAT IS TO be done with our New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam? The question is tearing at our community. Here's a sample from my mail:

Slams support of 'morning after pill'
Mary Beth Pierucci, director of external affairs for Planned Parenthood, advocates the use of mifepristone, the morning after pill for women facing unintended pregnancies. Her argument is that it will cut down on the anti-abortion, anti-choice protests and violence. Terri Exum, Martinez

Ruminates the Elian Gonzales case
Here is a timely scenario for us all to think about: A local woman gets an offer from her company to transfer to their office in Paris, France. She thinks about it and decides that her 8-year-old son would have a better life in Paris than in Augusta -- more culture, a richer history, etc. So without telling her husband she accepts the position and secretly plans for her and her son to move to Paris. Their departure day arrives, the woman kidnaps her son, and they board the plane for Paris without the knowledge or consent of her husband, the boy's father. John Hopkins, North Augusta

Slams remarks as 'Christian arrogance'
Once again Christian arrogance rules the day. Christopher Redmond pulled out his Bible (letter, Jan. 23) and showed us how homosexuality is wrong. Why is it that nobody pulled out a Bible during the Crusades or the Inquisition and pointed out one of the venerated Ten Commandments: ``Thou shalt not kill''? And as for taking God completely out of the picture so we can see that homosexuality ``does nothing to perpetuate the species.'' Last time I checked, watching baseball, reading the Bible, and writing letters to the editor didn't either. I'll bet Mr. Redmond would be pretty upset if someone of another religion questioned his rights to do those things. I personally find homosexuality uninteresting. Yet I have no issue against those who practice it.C. Llamas, Martinez

Calls mifepristone an abortifacient
In her letter, ``Urges approval of `morning after pill','' Mary Beth Pierucci states that ``many doctors who do not now provide abortions would be willing to offer mifepristone to their patients.'' She then states, ``If physicians begin to offer medical abortion services ...'' Charlene Luther, Augusta

Protests school I.D. badge penalty
I am a concerned parent who has a child attending Tubman Middle school. My problem is with the rules and regulations of the schools' administration and Richmond County Board of Education. Darla Long, Augusta

New SRS suit twist
Until CBS' 60 Minutes came along last Sunday, the class-action racial discrimination lawsuit filed three years ago by black workers against Savannah River Site contractors didn't have much resonance beyond our two-state area.

Sees no honor in 'emblem of slavery'
There have been many letters in support of continuing to fly the Confederate battle flag in South Carolina and the modified version on the Georgia flag. In many of those letters, we often hear references to ``honor,'' ``pride'' and ``heritage.'' T. Walton, Grovetown

Seeks law on car cell phone use
Your Jan. 19 editorial defended the use of cell phones while driving. Your supporting arguments included pervasiveness (so many people already have them), harmlessness (most cars just weave), and progress (new cars will have hands-free devices which should solve the problem). Susan Kinney, Waynesboro

Seeks visionary leaders in river flap
I have been amazed at the hoopla about lowering the river level by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. No one wants to be responsible for the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam and to keep it repaired. Yet, look at what happened when the river was drained. Mayor Bob Young must be nearsighted not to have seen the 200-foot mud flats on the South Carolina side of the river. Also, where does he think all those large boats at the Augusta docks are going without an outlet below the locks? The owners need to trade them for canoes. Curtis D. Choplin, North Augusta

Young: Multi-state project should be federally funded
WHAT IS TO be done with our New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam? The question is tearing at our community. Here's a sample from my mail:

Fears local drinking water endangered
I find it very disturbing that you could only give page 7A on Jan. 22 to the data on the gasoline additive MTBE and nothing to follow it up locally about our status. Every citizen in the United States should be up in arms about this threat to our drinking water supplies and the fact that our government and big business are only studying this continued spread and threat to our health. Jack Hobbs, Augusta

Sees a different picture without God
Re Christopher Redmond's Jan. 23 letter: I have always believed the Scriptures as being the foundation of right and wrong, and in Leviticus it does say that a man should not lie with a man as he does with a woman. Tammy Wapshott, North Augusta

Backs decommissioning lock and dam
Now that the hysteria has somewhat diminished, it is time for the public to pay greater attention to the comments made on theriver drawdown. The ecological advantages, which have been ignored in the economic calculations, have positive values that outweigh the assumed costs of eliminating the dam. In making these calculations we should consider: Judy Gordon, Ph.D., Evans

A new president
Finally there's a decent president in Washington. He's not only a can-do guy who knows his business, he also sets moral and leadership examples the nation can be proud to follow.

Praise stands of veteran editor
On behalf of many veterans of foreign wars, I want to extend my thanks to The Chronicle and columnist Phil Kent for your unwavering support of our men and women in the military. Regardless of what changes are made at The Chronicle Mr. Kent will remain our champion and our ``editor.'' J.H. Strickland, Evans

Welcomes 'biodegradable plastics'
The recent article ``Discovery of new catalyst could lead to improved plastics'' stated ``The new catalysts raise the possibility of developing polymers with new and exciting characteristics, perhaps even biodegradable plastics ...''James Hammett, Grovetown

Lauds shoot-from-the-hip editor
I have been trying to come up with a couple of pleasant comments to say about The Chronicle's longtime senior editorial writer Phil Kent and, well, I can't. But I can think of a bunch of nice things about him. Frank Murphy, Aiken

Hits NAACP's 'squandered resources'
Why would the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People squander their organizational and financial resources on the Confederate flag issue when there is so much else that needs its attention? Gary L. Herde, Augusta

Homeless foul-up
Augusta's homeless problem is serious, so it was disheartening to learn that local agencies missed out on hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal money because they didn't know the application rules.

Says Commission like 'student council'
I would like to express my concern about the mayor's discretionary fund being changed to a ``promotional account'' and every expenditure now requiring majority approval of the Augusta Commission. If the Commission had eliminated the mayor's discretionary fund or if they had done away with their own discretionary fund the situation would be different.Steve York, Martinez

Pay off U.S. debt!
Partisan political rhetoric, especially during an election year, can obscure what's really going on in government. Regardless of what party you belong to or who you plan to vote for, you should be encouraged at the fiscal direction in which the government is moving.

A fairer S.C. plan
South Carolina is the only state where members of the Employment Security Commission are elected by the General Assembly. In other states, governors appoint members to such agencies.

H.B. 1187: be careful
Gov. Roy Barnes and his House floor leader, Rep. Charlie Smith, D-St. Marys, cite poor producing schools and fear Georgia's education glass is half empty. State School Superintendent Linda Schrenko, noting the pass rate on most sections of the state high school graduation test have inched upward the past four years, says the education glass is half full.

Recruiting prospects are chosen early

Non-Division I teams are forced to dig deep

Academics the top priority

Selling a big key at small schools

Olympic champion slow in indoor comeback

Overtime: Hawks pair commits to Liberty U.

Visits weigh in the decision process

West headed to Furman

Tyson arrives in Manchester for bout

Overtime: A rough night for Cummings vs. Mavericks

This father does know best

Recruiters lobby everyone when it comes to players

DuBose guest speaker

Recruiters must solve mysteries

NASA renews effort to find missing Mars Lander
PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA sent command signals toward Mars on Wednesday to try to learn if a faint signal picked up by a radio dish at Stanford University came from the missing Mars Polar Lander.

Scientists surprised at how John Glenn handled rigors of space
BETHESDA, Md. -- John Glenn's 77-year-old body handled the rigors of space every bit as well as astronauts roughly half his age, NASA scientists said Friday in disclosing some of the lessons they learned from Glenn's historic mission.

Online health spending to soar
NEW YORK -- A strong demand for prescription drugs will push spending online for health care products and services to $9.8 billion in 2004, up from just $200 million in 1999, a new study says.

Studies: Flu is common and often dangerous
Two large studies show the flu is a surprisingly common and often dangerous infection in children, and researchers say routine flu shots should be considered for youngsters.

Disney's Go.com to quit the portal race
SEATTLE -- Go.com, the Internet subsidiary of the Walt Disney Co., will no longer try to compete with America Online Inc., Yahoo! Inc. and other all-purpose ``portal'' sites on the World Wide Web.

Farmers call for controls on genetically modified crops
MONTREAL -- Small-scale farmers from around the world came to Montreal on Wednesday to ask for regulations limiting what they call ``genetic pollution'' -- genetically modified crops spreading their altered genes into the environment around them.

Engine problem could delay Endeavour's flight
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A problem with an engine that propelled space shuttle Discovery into orbit last month could end up delaying Endeavour's upcoming launch.

Nuclear Radiation said to be healthful
The basis for John Cameron's crusade would shock most people: He believes we're not getting enough radiation every year.

Amazon.com announces 150 layoffs
SEATTLE -- Amazon.com, the biggest and one of the most celebrated retailers on the Internet even though it has yet to make any money, is laying off 150 people in its first-ever cutback.

Scientists report initial results of Glenn shuttle mission
WASHINGTON -- Science -- not joyriding or publicity -- was what prompted NASA to send John Glenn back to space, the agency steadfastly insisted during 1998's high-profile shuttle voyage.

First case of embalmer getting TB from corpse reported
Researchers in Baltimore have identified the first known case of an embalmer getting tuberculosis from a corpse.

Report: Teen smoking down
ATLANTA -- Smoking among high schoolers dropped in 1999 for the first time since the government began keeping track at the start of the decade. But nearly one in 10 children are already smoking cigarettes in middle school.

Internet gambling on the rise as Super Bowl nears
NEW YORK -- Football fans wagering on Sunday's Super Bowl over the Internet will have plenty of company: Online gambling is on the rise despite questions about its legality in the United States.

Emissions standards receive OK
ATLANTA -- The Georgia Board of Natural Resources gave final approval Wednesday to most elements of an air pollution reduction plan that will require the sale of low-sulfur gasoline by 2003 across much of Georgia's northern half, from Clarke and Oconee counties to the state's western border.

Studies: Flu is common and often dangerous

Online health spending to soar

Emissions standards receive OK

NASA renews effort to find missing Mars Lander

Scientists surprised at how John Glenn handled rigors of space

Engine problem could delay Endeavour's flight

Nuclear Radiation said to be healthful

Scientists report initial results of Glenn shuttle mission

First case of embalmer getting TB from corpse reported

Farmers call for controls on genetically modified crops

Internet gambling on the rise as Super Bowl nears

Disney's Go.com to quit the portal race