List ranks century's villains

Regency Mall plan unveiled

Survey measures CEOs' optimism

Business briefs: Rising stock brings calm to investors
NEW YORK -- Stocks rose Thursday after a report of relatively modest inflation boosted the bond market and calmed jittery stock investors. Financial shares led the Dow Jones industrials to a new closing record.

Survey measures CEOs' optimism
ATLANTA -- Executives in north Georgia are slightly more optimistic about their businesses' economic prospects than are top managers in middle and south Georgia, a survey showed Wednesday.

Utilities implement new billing

Alltel's service planned

Business briefs: Internet stocks fall amid mixed markets
NEW YORK -- Blue-chip industrial stocks once again stole the spotlight from flashier technology shares Wednesday, pushing higher as investors shied away from the slumping Internet sector.

Regency Mall plan unveiled
Windward Properties consultant Rick Wood offered a $30 million plan Thursday to revitalize Regency Mall -- the troubled shopping center that was once Georgia's largest.

Alltel's service planned
Alltel plans to offer local telephone service in Augusta and 16 other cities before the end of the year, the company announced this week.

Business briefs: Rising stock brings calm to investors

Utilities implement new billing
A two-week bill or no bill altogether from your power company or long-distance telephone carrier should not be cause for alarm, local utility companies say.

Business briefs: Internet stocks fall amid mixed markets

ACC notes: Tigers' offense coming to life

Jackets fade in second half against No. 6 Duke

Gamecocks may be surprise of SEC

Area notes: Young Lions show their maturity in win

Augusta State sweeps UNC-Pembroke

Gamecocks give scare to Syracuse

Tuskegee coach records 500th win

Wolfpack holds off Virginia

Georgia turnovers give Arkansas a win

Lady 'Dogs hold on to beat Florida

Jags need some time to tinker

Clemson surprises Wolfpack

Freshman helps No. 10 Florida drop LSU

SEC notes: Harrick takes shot at Dogs' backcourt

Ex-Thomson star has found a home at Long Beach St.

Blast bad publicity for pitcher Rocker

DFACS crackdown

Urges approval of 'morning after pill'

Criticizes photo of 'private moment'

Columbia Co. CEO?

Supports rights of Cuban dad

Appreciates inclusion as CSRA Giant

On the rocks

Objects to use of 'teen' in headlines

Advocates removal of Confederate flag

Blasts 'slime balls' editorial cartoon

Laments failure of Y2K disaster

Singer-actress exudes spiritual qualities
If you want to get ahead, get a headwrap. The advice has served singer-turned-actress Erykah Badu well. As a diva she's been part of the Lauryn Hill-Macy Gray generation, busy reshaping American soul music over the past few years.

'Country Cares' for children -- once again
More than a dozen country-music stars supplied acoustic versions of their recent hits for the Country Cares for Kids II collection released Tuesday to benefit St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn.

Koreans to show gratitude to U.S. with artful event
Traditional dance and martial and visual arts of Korea highlight Korea Comes to You, a cultural exchange Tuesday at Bell Auditorium in honor of Americans who fought on the Asian peninsula 50 years ago.

Power bracelets
Stacking up on arms across the nation, power beads may be the new decade's mood rings -- with a spiritual twist.

They're not heavy, they're a Christian metal band
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- The group few.left.standing. looks and sounds like other hard coremetal bands. Chris Stafford's arms are covered with tattoos, Jon Keegin wears a septum ring, and there are the double kick drums and the speed metal riffs.

In the spirit of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Invoking the spirit and message of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., the Augusta Mini Theatre and the NAACP are offering events Saturday to both entertain and educate.

Young guitarist masters many styles
Over the course of his musical career, guitarist Derek Trucks has played with a pantheon of music

Augusta State again doing the write thing
For a decade now, Augusta State University has sponsored the Winter Gathering of Writers. The event, which brings scribes together to discuss their craft with working regional writers, will feature Phyllis Alesia Perry, the winner of the 1999 Georgia Author of the Year Award.

Returning home
For some Moscowmusicians, traveling to the United States means culture shock.

Creative design with traditional material
LOS ANGELES -- No one questions tile's place in the bathroom or the kit

Traveling theater troupe makes a stop in Augusta
Before television brought entertainment to the masses, and before every town and hamlet had a multiplex theater offering the latest fruits of Hollywood's labors, theater troupes crisscrossed the country, giving audiences entertainment and maybe an infusion of culture.

Ladybugs come in for heat
Q: I have had all these ladybugs invade my house this winter! Why are they coming inside, and what can I do about it?

Level of Warnings Varies From Label to Label
A scan of labels on several supplements carried by a Los Angeles medical center pharmacy found a wide variation in the level of warnings about potential interactions, showing the limited information available to consumers.

Frost forecasts don't depend on the official air temperature
Unseasonably warm weather? Nah! The past several years, I've been so confused by the weather, nobody, not even the Weather Channel guy my wife calls "the Weather Stud," can convince me it'll ever be normal again.

Journal documents great escapes during war
An American infantry captain and an Army Air Corps lieutenant temporarily assigned to service with ground troops find themselves trapped by the Japanese in the Philippine Islands during the early going of World War II.

Black orchestra brings enlightenment
Atlanta's African-American Philharmonic Orchestra is not in the entertainment business.

Mild weather scatters fish; hybrids school in Dordon

Mild weather scatters fish; hybrids school in Dordon

Fishing tournament information

Barrow named director of First Tee

Woods, Duval skipping Sony Open

Azinger takes first-round lead

High school scores

S. Aiken's Callahan finally gets shot at stardom

Thrashers defenseman undergoes neck surgery

Soling learns to take his shots

Lynx ledger

Ftorek anticipates turnaround

List ranks century's villains
There have been a lot of polls reported during the past few months offering us the best of this and the best of that for the 20th century.

Proposed tax credit for electronic filing
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton will ask Congress this year to create a tax credit of up to $10 for people who file federal income taxes electronically. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers said today that Clinton will include in his fiscal 2001 budget request to Congress next month a $10 refundable tax credit for taxpayers filing online and a $5 credit for people who file over the telephone using the IRS' Telefile. Full story The Augusta Chronicle

Twice as many Americans by 2100
WASHINGTON -- A century from now there will be twice as many Americans as today, the Census Bureau predicts. While no one knows what daily life will be like in 100 years, the new population projections being issued Thursday conjure images of twice as many cars jostling for position on the highways and twice as many shoppers crowding the aisles at Wal-Mart. From an estimated 275 million people today, the bureau projects a U.S. population of 571 million in the year 2100. That might not seem terribly crowded, however, because the nation is so sprawling. Full story -- The Augusta Chronicle

Barnes outlines education proposals
ATLANTA -- Declaring ``it's time to stop making excuses,'' Gov. Roy Barnes proposed a series of education reforms today that included limited public school choice for some students, a round of new student tests, the creation of local school councils to help run schools and abolition of teacher tenure. ``I have a message for those who say that the education system we have, the bureaucracy we have and the progress we have made are good enough: You are wrong. Dead wrong,'' he said in a speech prepared for a joint session of the Legislature. ``And I simply can't allow it any more.'' Under the governor's school choice proposal, students would be allowed to ask for a transfer to another school if: Full story The Augusta Chronicle

Georgia one of most smoggy states
WASHINGTON -- California and Texas were among the states with the worst smog problem last year, an environmental group said today after assembling preliminary air quality data from the states. Georgia was ranked as the sixth-worst among 50 states. Full story The Augusta Chronicle

Wall Street Update
NEW YORK -- Stocks were modestly higher today as technology shares recovered from a two-day slump and the broader market gained strength from a report of relatively modest inflation. In midday trading on Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 12.33 at 11,563.43. Broader stock indicators were also slightly higher. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was up 4.24 at 1,436.49, and the Nasdaq composite index was up 19.61 at 3,869.63. Full story The Augusta Chronicle

Census seeks local government support
WASHINGTON -- The Census Bureau is trying to drum up support among local government officials in hopes of improving public participation in the national head count. It costs the agency millions of dollars to track down and interview people who fail to mail back their census forms, so it wants state and local politicians to help remind people to fill out the questionnaires. Full story -- The Augusta Chronicle

Wall Street update
NEW YORK -- Stocks were mixed today as investors again moved money away from pricey technology shares and toward blue-chip industrials that perform well when the economy is growing. In afternoon trading on Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 65.15 at 11,576.23, narrowly higher than its closing record of 11,572.20 set on Monday. Broader stock indicators were slightly lower. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 1.79 at 1,436.77, and the Nasdaq composite index was off 19.54 at 3,901.65. In earlier trading, the Nasdaq was down as much as 86 points. Full story -- The Augusta Chronicle

Level of Warnings Varies From Label to Label

'Country Cares' for children -- once again

Traveling theater troupe makes a stop in Augusta

Augusta State again doing the write thing

In the spirit of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Koreans to show gratitude to U.S. with artful event

Young guitarist masters many styles

Journal documents great escapes during war

Returning home

Singer-actress exudes spiritual qualities

Black orchestra brings enlightenment

Power bracelets

They're not heavy, they're a Christian metal band

Creative design with traditional material

Ladybugs come in for heat

Frost forecasts don't depend on the official air temperature

Across the area: Police seek man in bank robbery

Female officer breaks barriers
Looking through a women's memorial calendar this week, U.S. Army Col. Velma Richardson was inspired by the images on the January 2001 page: four female 3-star generals.

Education plan shakes up schools
ATLANTA -- Gov. Roy Barnes conceded Thursday that his education-reform plan will draw fire, but he asked the General Assembly to enact it anyway, putting an end to several benefits teachers have long considered important.

School officials look to push back school start times

Plane crashes in Richmond Co.

Gas re-regulation discouraged
ATLANTA -- Despite consumer complaints, Georgia's natural-gas industry shouldn't be re-regulated, Public Service Commissioner Lauren ``Bubba'' McDonald told lawmakers Wednesday.

Leslie convicted of murder

Children's death files reviewed
ATHENS, Ga. -- The Georgia Bureau of Investigation is reviewing case files of seven children who died while in contact with the Clarke County Department of Family and Children Services. It's part of a statewide investigation focusing on 13 children's deaths in six counties, officials said.

Columbia braces for flag opponent rally

Cannon recovered from river
SAVANNAH -- It's hard to tell that the oyster-encrusted object pulled Tuesday from the muddy banks of the Wilmington River could have changed the course of history.

Across the area: Morning wreck leaves man dead
A 35-year-old Barnwell County, S.C., man was charged with felony driving under the influence Thursday after the vehicle he was driving overturned and killed a man.

Plumbing codes to be enforced
Trouble could be brewing in miles of pipe linking thousands of Columbia County homes to the county's sewer system.

Baby alarm

Events set in honor of King
Residents, businesses and organizations in the Augusta area vary on ways to commemorate the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday this year.

Children's death files reviewed

He ain't heavy
Allen Bailey, 5, holds onto his younger brother, Aaron, while their mother, Beth Bailey, helps them ride the wobble horse Wednesday afternoon at a park at North Augusta Community Center.

Education plan shakes up schools

Rocker still doesn't get it

Wall Street update

Across the area: Police seek man in bank robbery
North Augusta police and federal agents are looking for a Hephzibah man in connection with a robbery at Regions Bank on Tuesday.

School officials look to push back school start times
Next year, Columbia County pupils might get more time before they have to be at school.

Kneece loses extradition fight
Etheridge Kneece will have his day in court for his alleged role in the slayings of his wife and her ex-husband, but it will not be in South Carolina.

Foul play
Artist Richard Worth paints animal scenes in the maternity ward at Doctors Hospital. The button on the panda's nose will be pushed every time a baby is born, and music will play throughout the hospital to signal that a new life has begun.

Dry-cleaning solvent found in well
One of six municipal drinking water wells found to contain traces of a toxic dry-cleaning solvent has been shut down as a precaution, according to Augusta officials and state regulators.

File probe yields no evidence
ATHENS, Ga. -- Two Clarke County child abuse files under scrutiny in a statewide criminal investigation already have been reviewed by one state agency, and no evidence of a crime was revealed, according to county Department of Family and Children Services officials.

Leslie convicted of murder
It took nearly five hours Wednesday for a jury to decide the only reasonable explanation for Lori Joe Hastings' terrifying death was that Sajid Leslie murdered her.

Georgia one of most smoggy states

Doctor found liable in malpractice case

Events set in honor of King

Soldier faces trial in Iowa woman's death

Plumbing codes to be enforced

Wall Street Update

Dry-cleaning solvent found in well

Census encourages participation
WARRENVILLE -- Nearly 2 percent of Aiken County's residents were not counted in the 1990 U.S. census.

Air show planning begins

Census seeks local government support

Exhumation of child's body ordered by judge
CARNESVILLE, Ga. -- A Superior Court judge has ordered the exhumation of an infant's body so state medical examiners can perform an autopsy on the child, whose mother is charged with murder in Franklin County for allegedly killing the infant by using illegal drugs during pregnancy.

Across the area: Morning wreck leaves man dead

He ain't heavy

Foul play

City bills Cellular One for tax
The city has billed Cellular One's operator $394,956 for emergency 911 taxes the company should have collected from its customers on behalf of Augusta government.

Female officer breaks barriers

Canal foliage marred
Two Augusta-Richmond County Public Works Department employees were suspended without pay after a brief but destructive foray last week along the towpath of the Augusta Canal National Heritage Area.

Barnes outlines education proposals

Plane crashes in Richmond Co.
An Evans man was killed Thursday when the single-engine experimental aircraft he was piloting crashed less than a mile from the south Richmond County airfield where he took off.

Baby alarm
Artist Richard Worth paints animal scenes in the maternity ward at Doctors Hospital. The button on the panda's nose will be pushed every time a baby is born, and music will play throughout the hospital to signal that a new life has begun.

Aiken County has substitute shortage
AIKEN -- By now, the number has been repeated so often it's become a mantra: more than 2 million teachers.

Soldier faces trial in Iowa woman's death
A Fort Gordon soldier will be extradited to Britt, Iowa, this week to face charges in the stabbing death of a 19-year-old.

Columbia braces for flag opponent rally
COLUMBIA -- With a rolling rebel yell from nearly 7,000 Confederate flag supporters barely faded, authorities are bracing for Monday and a possibly even bigger crowd that wants the flag removed from South Carolina's Capitol dome.

Cannon recovered from river

Air show planning begins
The Augusta Aviation Commission voted Thursday to host a full air show the weekend the Blue Angels perform at Augusta Regional Airport during Skyfest 2000 -- only 70 days away.

Jags need some time to tinker

File probe yields no evidence

Kneece loses extradition fight

Canal foliage marred

Gas re-regulation discouraged

City bills Cellular One for tax

Census encourages participation

Aiken County has substitute shortage

Doctor found liable in malpractice case
An elderly woman who required two life-saving operations after her esophagus was nearly severed during outpatient surgery won a $480,000 judgment Thursday against an anesthesiologist.

No fool's gold, these Nuggets are for real

Carter, Raptors roll past Magic

Hornets-Knicks game postponed as teammates grieve for Phills

Jordan could join Wizards front office

Hornets guard killed in car crash

Marbury, Nets stop Clipper comeback to win

Garnett scores 19 in T'wolves win

Gilliam's fourth quarter spurt lifts Jazz

Bucs are well rested

Colts' sack leader almost was a Titan

Tackle shakes his rap

Parcells, prospective new owner meet

Prosecutors petition for death penalty against Carruth

Two of NFL's brightest young stars are in quarterfinals

Rams, Vikings set to fill the end zone

Playoff game reunites college foes

Is this Marino's last stand?

AugustaSports.Com: The Augusta Chronicle's College Basketball Coverage: Jags need some time to tinker 01/13/00

AugustaSports.Com: The Augusta Chronicle's Pro Basketball Coverage: Hornets guard killed in car crash 01/13/00

Mrs. Ella Powell
Ella Johnson Powell, 100, of Lynnwood Drive, Martinez, died Sunday, Jan. 9, 2000 at her residence.

Ryan Dunn
Ryan Joseph Dunn, infant son of Randolph J. Dunn Sr. and Gertrude Dunn, Evans, died Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mr. Warren Wilkerson
ATLANTA -- Mr. Warren Wilkerson, 78, of Lochland Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000.

Mr. Walter Moody
BATH -- Mr. Walter Richard Moody, 75, of Hampton Drive, died Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mr. Werner Jeep
Mr. Werner C. Jeep, 72, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mr. Claude Tyrrell
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mr. Claude M. Tyrrell, 86, of Sikes Avenue, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Peter Consolie II
BARNWELL, S.C. -- Mr. Peter Anthony Consolie II, 32, died Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000, in Aiken.

Mr. Jerry Booker
Mr. Jerry D. Booker, 76, of Augusta, died Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000, at the Georgia War Veterans Home.

Ms. Mary Wright
Ms. Mary E. Wright, 53, of R.A. Dent Boulevard, died Sunday, Jan. 9, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mr. John Johnson Jr.
Mr. John Johnson Jr., of Cairo Drive, died Sunday, Jan. 9, 2000, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

Mr. Gregory Thompkins
Mr. Gregory Thompkins, 37, of Hollis Road, Augusta, died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000, at Blair House Nursing Home.

Mr. Robert Fields
BATESBURG-LEESVILLE, S.C. -- Mr. Robert H. Fields, 81, of Route 3, died Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2000, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, Augusta.

Mr. Alden Tate
CENTRALIA, Ill. -- Mr. Alden R. ``Audie'' Tate, 71, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at the residence.

Ms. Margaret Freeman
Ms. Margaret Freeman, 85, died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000, at her residence.

Jerry Gay Taylor
MILLEN -- Mr. Jerry Gay Taylor, 59, of Paynes Chapel Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Eola Jenkins
TENNILLE, Ga. -- Mrs. Eola Jenkins, 90, of Joiner Road, died Friday, Jan. 7, 2000, at Washington County Regional Medical Center, Sandersville.

Mrs. Wylene Jackson
BLYTHE -- Mrs. Wylene P. Jackson, 70, of Deans Bridge Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mr. William Carr
BELVEDERE -- Mr. William Joseph Carr, 80, of Cherokee Drive, died Friday, Jan. 7, 2000, at St. Joseph Hospital, Augusta.

Mrs. Grace Tate
CENTRALIA, Ill. -- Mrs. Grace M. Tate, 67, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at St. Mary's Hospital.

Mrs. Esther Hilton
ALLENDALE, S.C. -- Mrs. Esther Louise Hilton, 80, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at Regional Medical Center.

Mr. W. Glynn Welch
HARLEM -- Mr. Wilber Glynn Welch, 63, of County Line Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at Doctors Hospital.

Ms. Margaret Horner
Ms. Margaret Mecham Horner, 82, of Windsong Way, died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mrs. Jamie Lee
STATESBORO, Ga. -- Mrs. Jamie Aldred Lee, 81, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at Memorial Health University Hospital, Savannah.

Ms. Carrie Hamilton
LAUREL SPRINGS, N.J. -- Ms. Carrie Hamilton, 99, died Friday, Jan. 7, 2000, at her residence.

Mr. John Johnson Sr.
Mr. John Johnson Sr., of Cairo Drive, died Sunday, Jan. 9, 2000, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

Mr. Larry Wilson
LAWRENCEVILLE, Ga. -- Mr. Larry G. Wilson, 53, died Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Robert Fields
BATESBURG-LEESVILLE, S.C. -- Mr. Robert H. Fields, 81, of Route 3, died Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2000, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, Augusta.

Dr. Carl Whipple
Dr. Carl Era Whipple, 99, of Evans, died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. E. Clyde Murphy
AIKEN -- Mr. E. Clyde Murphy, 86, died Sunday, Jan. 2, 2000, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mr. Jeffery Coles
SAN FRANCISCO -- Mr. Jeffery Cecil Coles, 32, died Sunday, Jan. 9, 2000, in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Mr. Lawrence Hilson
MITCHELL, Ga. -- Mr. Lawrence Hilson, 76, of Griffin Chapel Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at McDuffie County Regional Medical Center.

Frances Axtell
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mrs. Frances Axtell, 68, of Sweetwater Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at her residence.

Mr. James Lewis Sr.
LITHONIA, Ga. -- Mr. James Graham Lewis Sr., 87, of Lake Capri Drive, died Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000, at Mews Retirement Center.

Mr. Albert Smith
DEEPSTEP, Ga. -- Mr. Albert Leroy Smith, 79, of Tucker Road, died Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2000, at Washington County Regional Medical Center, Sandersville.

Mrs. Ola Howell
JEWELL, Ga. -- Mrs. Ola Dye Howell, 95, died Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000, at Thomson Manor.

Mr. Calvin Martin
Mr. Calvin Martin, 46, of Monroe Street, died Friday, Jan. 7, 2000, at University Hospital.

Ms. Ida Lewis
Ms. Ida Elizabeth Lewis, 86, of Dublin Drive, Augusta, died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000, at Windermere Nursing Home.

Miss Tabathy Ishman
Miss Tabathy Ishman, 24, of Basswood Drive, died Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2000, at University Hospital.

Mr. Willie Cain
GRANITEVILLE -- Mr. Willie W. ``Buster'' Cain, 61, of Taylor Pond Road, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Tom Scott
Mr. Tom Scott, of River Glen Apartments, died Sunday, Jan. 9, 2000, at Veterans Administrative Medical Centers.

Mr. Marvin Curley
Mr. Marvin Curley, 19, of Libby Drive, died Thursday, Jan. 6, 2000.

Mrs. Barbara Kemp
AIKEN -- Mrs. Barbara Jean Kemp, 56, of Oriole Street, died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000 at her resident.

Ms. Louise Houston
LAKELAND, Fla. -- Ms. Louise Scott Houston, 56, of West 13th Street, died Friday, Jan. 7, 2000, at Lakeland Medical Center.

Judge Billy Deal
STATESBORO, Ga. -- Judge Billy Joe Deal, 66, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at Bulloch Memorial Hospital.

Mr. Douglas Anderson
Mr. Douglas Ray Anderson, 20, of Martinez, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000.

Mrs. Mary Deese
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mrs. Mary S. Deese, 78, of Royalette Avenue, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mrs. Ruth Harp
Mrs. Ruth HarpROME, Ga. -- Mrs. Ruth Shroyer Harp died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000.

Mr. James Dorn
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mr. James Earl Dorn, 85, of Lakeview Road, died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, Augusta.

Mrs. Mary Dukes
ALLENDALE, S.C. -- Mrs. Mary Lee Kelly Dukes, 51, of Pecan Street, died Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2000, at John E. Harter Nursing Center.

Mrs. Josephine Entzminger
SALLEY -- Mrs. Josephine Marshall Entzminger, 85, of Hanson Curtis Road, died Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2000, at Silver Springs Health Care, Williston.

Mr. Herman Hendrix
STATESBORO, Ga. -- Mr. Herman Hendrix, 54, died Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000, at St. Joseph's Hospital, Savannah.

Mr. Johnny Cooper
THOMSON -- Mr. Johnny R. Cooper, 28, died Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2000, at Warrenton Health and Rehabilitation.

Mr. Rodney Gardenhire
CLARKS HILL, S.C. -- Mr. Rodney Gardenhire, 43, of Georgia Highway 28, died Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2000, at his residence.

Mr. Vernon Kennedy
Mr. Vernon M. Kennedy, 72, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at his residence.

Mrs. Ruth Browmer
HAMPTON, S.C. -- Mrs. Ruth Mary Browmer, 81, of Ellis Street, died Monday, Jan. 10, 2000, at Medical University Hospital, Charleston.

Mrs. Jeanette Bilton
MARION, N.C. -- Mrs. Jeanette Wellmaker Bilton, 65, of Mountain View Care Center, died Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000, at her residence.

Mr. James Fanning
Aiken -- Mr. James Earl Fanning, 63, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2000, at Pepperhill Nursing Center.

Mrs. Minnie Williams
WAYNESBORO, Ga. -- Mrs. Minnie Lee Williams, of Brentwood Terrace Drive, died Saturday, Jan. 8, 2000, at Burke County Hospital.

Mrs. Elizabeth Loudermilk
Mrs. Elizabeth Ingle ``Libby'' Loudermilk, 81, died Sunday, Jan. 9, 2000, at her residence.

Mr. Tom Scott

Mr. Marvin Curley

Mr. Larry Wilson

Ms. Margaret Horner

Mrs. Mary Dukes

Mr. Robert Fields

Mrs. Jamie Lee

Dr. Carl Whipple

Mrs. Elizabeth Loudermilk

Mr. Gregory Thompkins

Mrs. Josephine Entzminger

Mr. Jerry Booker

Frances Axtell

Mrs. Esther Hilton

Mrs. Ruth Harp

Mr. Douglas Anderson

Mr. Werner Jeep

Mr. Rodney Gardenhire

Mr. James Dorn

Mr. Claude Tyrrell

Ms. Ida Lewis

Mr. Warren Wilkerson

Mrs. Grace Tate

Ryan Dunn

Ms. Margaret Freeman

Mr. William Carr

Mrs. Ola Howell

Mr. John Johnson Sr.

Mr. Willie Cain

Mr. James Fanning

Mr. Walter Moody

Mrs. Mary Deese

Mr. Herman Hendrix

Mr. Calvin Martin

Mrs. Barbara Kemp

Ms. Mary Wright

Ms. Carrie Hamilton

Mr. W. Glynn Welch

Mr. Albert Smith

Mr. E. Clyde Murphy

Mrs. Wylene Jackson

Jerry Gay Taylor

Mrs. Minnie Williams

Mrs. Eola Jenkins

Mrs. Jeanette Bilton

Mr. Alden Tate

Mr. Lawrence Hilson

Mr. Peter Consolie II

Mrs. Ella Powell

Defends writer, condemns message
The Chronicle recently addressed Attorney General Thurbert Baker's opinion that an elective biblical course can be of-fered in Georgia's state-funded high schools if narrowly tailored so as not to promote religion. There has since been some debate, fueled by letters from two area ministers.\rMatt Alan, Martinez

Health care a top issue facing Georgia legislators
THEY'RE baa-aaaaaack: yes, the Georgia General Assembly is now open for business in Atlanta. I know this comes as a severe disappointment to those who were hoping that the Y2K bug would somehow manage to wipe out government, but there's always Y3K.

Kentucky's education reform left unwanted legacy
OZ NELSON, the former chairman of Kentucky's Partnership for School Reform and member of Georgia's current Education Commission, recently critiqued Sue Burmeister's guest column on education reform. His take on Burmeister's article was inaccurate and not without some irony for those of us in Kentucky who still live with the legacy of our reform effort.

Blast bad publicity for pitcher Rocker
I just finished watching an MSNBC discussion, once again, on Braves pitcher John Rocker. As I listened to the different sports-affiliated personnel and the comments from those who called in, I came to one conclusion: Mr. Rocker did screw up by voicing his opinion. Cheryl Key, Hephzibah

Cut S.C. food tax!
Republicans and Democrats are at each other's throats over tax cuts in South Carolina, just as they are everywhere else.

Defends writer, condemns message
The Chronicle recently addressed Attorney General Thurbert Baker's opinion that an elective biblical course can be of-fered in Georgia's state-funded high schools if narrowly tailored so as not to promote religion. There has since been some debate, fueled by letters from two area ministers. Matt Alan, Martinez

Rossiter: 'Disability' laws wreck havoc on education
Student's are expected to learn in school, but how can they when the classroom is constantly disrupted by the ``behaviorally disabled''?`Disability' laws wreak havoc on education

Advocates removal of Confederate flag
I am proud to say I am American by birth and Southern by the grace of God. Over the years I have had the rebel flag on my house, my shirts, my car and even my boat. I respect and admire the sacrifices that were made in all the wars that we as a nation have waged over the years in support of freedom and the American way, not just the Civil War. But I have been extremely disappointed in the rhetoric coming from Columbia. For instance, Sen. Arthur Ravenel, R-Charleston, calling the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People ``the national association of retarded people.'' And my own Rep. Charles Sharpe, R-Aiken, calling for the rebel flag to be put above the U.S. and South Carolina flag. Rep. Sharpe's position on the flag seems to me to be even worse than that of Sen. Ravenel's. Rep. Sharpe's statement essentially likened itself to being in support of the Confederacy, not the United States or South Carolina which he swore to uphold in his oath of office. Kent Brown, New Ellenton

DFACS crackdown
When it comes to malfeasance, incompetence, and possible criminality, it would be hard to beat Georgia's Division of Family and Children Services.

Supports rights of Cuban dad
The Immigration and Naturalization Service made the right decision to send the Cuban boy back to his father. Sure, the United States is a better place to bring a kid up in, but the boy's father lives in Cuba -- and the boy belongs with his natural father. Jefiner Jones, Waynesboro

Walker & the veto
In a recent TV interview, Sen. Charles Walker, D-Augusta, made some heartening remarks about strengthening the authority of the Augusta mayor, perhaps by giving him (or her) a vote on the 10-member Commission or, at least, veto power over the budget.

Health care a top issue facing Georgia legislators
THEY'RE baa-aaaaaack: yes, the Georgia General Assembly is now open for business in Atlanta. I know this comes as a severe disappointment to those who were hoping that the Y2K bug would somehow manage to wipe out government, but there's always Y3K.

Aiken flies tamed?
The City Council's first meeting of the year has gotten Aiken's new year off to a smooth start. The Council unanimously approved formation of a Horse Advisory Committee. The new panel will not, as the name suggests, advise horses. It will instead counsel horse owners on how to prevent their animals' manure from stinking up their neighbors' property and attracting flies, possibly creating a health hazard.

Columbia Co. CEO?
What started as Christmas season ``party talk'' among Columbia County's state legislators has evolved into a constructive debate now involving county commissioners and citizens about the scope and direction of local government.

Urges approval of 'morning after pill'
Jan. 22 marks the 27th anniversary of the landmark Roe v. Wade decision that made abortion legal in the United States. Since that time, abortion services have taken place against a backdrop of extremist rhetoric, protest and even violence. However, on the horizon of this new century is the Food and Drug Administration approval of mifepristone, formerly known as RU486. With mifepri-stone available, women facing unintended pregnancies will have access to another safe early abortion option already available to women in Europe ... Mary Beth Pierucci, Augusta

Kentucky's education reform left unwanted legacy
OZ NELSON, the former chairman of Kentucky's Partnership for School Reform and member of Georgia's current Education Commission, recently critiqued Sue Burmeister's guest column on education reform. His take on Burmeister's article was inaccurate and not without some irony for those of us in Kentucky who still live with the legacy of our reform effort.

Objects to use of 'teen' in headlines
Your newspaper is well read in our house every day. One of the practices causing a major irritant is the sensationalism of using the term ``teen'' in articles' headlines. For instance, in ``Across the Area'' on Jan 9: ``Teens will not face death penalty.'' The ``teens'' referred to are l8-year-old adults who will be tried and sentenced as the adults they are. The term ``teen'' is usually thought to refer to a young adolescent between l3 and l7. The persons referred to in most headlines of this type are l8- and l9-years- old and are obviously adults. Geraldine Connally, Mitchell

Criticizes photo of 'private moment'
In regard to Justen Wonderly's letter: Yes, I was very offended by the picture in the Jan. 2 paper. That was a private moment between a husband and his wife. The photographer had no right to interfere. How would Chronicle photographer Ron Cockerille feel if it was him in that situation? Would he like photographers taking pictures? Robin Rogers, Augusta

Appreciates inclusion as CSRA Giant
It was both astounding and very exciting to find my name on your Jan. 1 list of 20 CSRA residents who had been considered significant to the two-state area. Believe me, at 5 feet 1 inch tall, I've never been called a giant! Nancy Anderson Donnan, Beaufort, N.C.

Laments failure of Y2K disaster
Y2K struck and no computers blew up, nor was cell phone use disrupted. Darn it! I was sort of hoping that we would be forced to go back to those glorious days when the grocery store clerks would add up your order on the back of the bag or ring it up on a manual adding machine, while making pleasant conversation, after which you paid cash and didn't have to wait for somebody to write a check or run a credit card through a machine. Robert H. Rihl, Augusta

On the rocks
When Atlanta TV mogul and Braves' owner Ted Turner and his Viet Cong sympathizer wife Jane Fonda went their separate ways, even though they both said they were committed to the long term success of their marriage, the news media reported their marriage was on the rocks.

Hits candidacy of Texas governor
It seems the most likely pick for the Republicans will be George W. Bush. But will he be the peo-ple's choice? I hope not, at least not based on what we know now. Herbert A. Edney IV, Augusta

Blasts 'slime balls' editorial cartoon
I can respect anyone's opinion on politics, religion or anything else, but when I pick up the newspaper and see a cartoon like ``Slime balls spotted in the Savannah'' (Jan. 8), I can see why Southerners are sometimes depicted as ignorant country bumpkins. This cartoon was way beyond poor taste. Elaine van der Linden, Belvedere

Players give Sydney 2000 tennis venue thumbs up

Rocker still doesn't get it

Hall of Famer Lemon dies

Britain rules Tyson can enter country to fight

Promoter says Tyson fight still on

South Carolina realigns regions

Overtime: Hudson close to gaining Trials berth

Overtime: CBS expects to complete deal with Enberg

Congress members visit SRS
Some Savannah River Site activities might be difficult to categorize during a pending reorganization of the U.S. Department of Energy, a congressman said Thursday.

Study suggests biological basis for serious antisocial behavior
CHICAGO -- Very aggressive boys have been found to have lower-than-expected levels of a stress hormone in their saliva, suggesting that their behavior might be biologically based and hard to treat with counseling, researchers reported Thursday.

Gates appoints Ballmer as Microsoft CEO
REDMOND, Wash. -- Microsoft chairman Bill Gates on Thursday promoted his longtime friend and company president, Steve Ballmer, to chief executive officer of the software giant that Gates co-founded.

Bayer ads went too far, government says
WASHINGTON -- Think taking aspirin can prevent a heart attack? It can reduce some risk -- but not for everybody. The distinction is costing Bayer Corp. $1 million, the tab for a consumer education program announced Tuesday to settle government charges that Bayer's advertising oversold aspirin's benefits.

Clinton wants to double funds for biofuel production
WASHINGTON -- Aiming to replace fossil fuels with cleaner, renewable energy sources, President Clinton is proposing to more than double federal spending on efforts to turn corn husks, chicken droppings and other waste into power for cars and buildings, White House officials said Thursday.

HIV rebound not always due to drug resistance
CHICAGO -- When potent drugs fail to keep HIV in check, the reason might not be that the virus has become drug-resistant, as some doctors and patients fear.

Microsoft could be broken into three pieces
WASHINGTON -- Government lawyers in the Microsoft antitrust case want to break the software giant into three parts, arguing that lesser sanctions would be inadequate, people close to the discussions confirmed Wednesday.

Researchers clone monkeys by splitting embryos
WASHINGTON -- Genetically identical monkeys are being cloned by Oregon researchers, who are splitting early-stage embryos and then implanting the pieces into mother animals.

Philip Morris tests reaction to cigarette with lower fire risk
NEW YORK -- Philip Morris has developed a slower-burning paper that may lower the chance that a discarded or dropped cigarette will start a fire.

Health monitor
Susan Urton displays a health assistance device, called Health Buddy, which connects her to her doctor through the Internet to her physician's office from her Rocklin, Calif., home Jan. 7, 2000.

Automatic cameras reduce red-light runners
WASHINGTON -- Automatic cameras that take pictures at traffic intersections are an effective tool for reducing the number of drivers running red lights, the government says.

Astronomers find complex organic molecules in space
ATLANTA -- A primordial soup of complex organic chemicals that could be the precursors of life is cooked up very quickly after the birth of stars, new research suggests.

Girl's sudden paralysis caused by tick
Tears still spring to her eyes when Wendy Ennis remembers watching her daughter Brandy Lemke struggling to breathe. The girl's sudden and mysterious deterioration left the family praying outside the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Medical College of Georgia Children's Medical Center. Their answer came in the form of a tiny, hidden culprit.

Gates appoints Ballmer as Microsoft CEO

Researchers clone monkeys by splitting embryos

Girl's sudden paralysis caused by tick

Bayer ads went too far, government says

Study suggests biological basis for serious antisocial behavior

Microsoft could be broken into three pieces

Clinton wants to double funds for biofuel production

Philip Morris tests reaction to cigarette with lower fire risk

Automatic cameras reduce red-light runners

Congress members visit SRS

Astronomers find complex organic molecules in space