Deciding Rocker's fate a tricky issue

Best-laid plans often go awry

Business briefs: Stocks finish lower after early advance

Comcast's cable rates rise
You've probably already noticed Comcast's little white pamphlet in your mail box.

New year time for fresh start

High prices deter many from millenium merchandise
With less than 24 hours left in the year 2000 countdown, retailers and risk-taking entrepreneurs are hoping they will sell all their wares commemorating the new year by midnight.

Business briefs: Stocks finish lower after early advance
NEW YORK -- Stocks drifted lower in a quiet session Thursday, with most market averages slipping back from the record highs set Wednesday. Early gains evaporated as demand waned in the last full session of 1999.

Business briefs: Health insurers extend merger deal

High prices deter many from millenium merchandise

Business briefs: Health insurers extend merger deal
ATLANTA -- The parent company of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia announced Thursday it has agreed to extend its merger agreement with WellPoint Health Networks Inc. to allow time for the courts to rule on a lawsuit by its shareholders.

New year time for fresh start
Michael Cave plans to spend a couple of hours this holiday weekend with his wife reflecting on their accomplishments and thinking about what they want to do for the rest of the new year.

Comcast's cable rates rise

Suspension rattles Cotton Bowl rivalry

Warrick doesn't want to lose this trophy

Warrick, Vick not only weapons in teams' arsenals

Dogs enter 2000 with optimism

Comparisons to Warrick don't faze Miami's Moss

News of shooting gives Donnan scare

Jackets' defense: Believe in us

Hamilton leads the way for Ga. Tech

Clemson falls to Miss. St.

Orange Bowl a flop with fans

Stanford won't focus on Dayne

Tigers' renaissance beginning

Colorado routs Boston College

Tech, Miami expect a high scoring game

Boise State tops Louisville, 34-31

Citrus teams have differing views for bowl

Freshman comes through for Clemson

Win would give Georgia fresh start

Va. Tech president preps for kicking contest

Wisconsin looks to repeat

Bell making most of first bowl game

Outback bowl will likely be a shootout

Hokies' Davis runs over competition

Ole Miss posts 4th bowl win in row

Bowls a tough sell this year

UConn tops Houston

Paine drops ninth straight to ASU

New Year's song remains ingrained in public mind
Depending on where you celebrate New Year's Eve tonight, the turntables will spin Prince's 1999, Barry Manilow's It's Just Another New Year's Eve, or even, heaven forbid, Will Smith's Will 2K.

Defends Animal Control chief

Commission fooled?

1999's worst quotes

Defends actions of chief, firefighters

Defends 'agenda' of homosexuals

Supports employees at animal shelter

Says Dorsey needs "Logic 101"

Hits decommissioning Lock and Dam

Raps complaints about abandoned cars

Bashes stand on homosexual rights

Says Dorsey needs "Logic 101"

Canada perils U.S.

Rip Braves' Rocker for comments

Hits inconsistency of sentences

Bashes stand on homosexual rights

1999's worst quotes

Defends ballplayer's free speech rights

Defends Animal Control chief

Columbine massacre darkest news of violent year
Moments before the fateful lunch break, a Columbine High School classmate saw Rachel Joy Scott drawing in one of her spiral-bound journals.

Ramblin' Rhodes: Country stars have plenty to say
Traditionally, my last column of the year is devoted to my favorite quotes from interviews of the past 12 months:

Toymaker brings ethnicity to Bible
LOS ANGELES -- What color was Jesus? This and similar questions about the characters in the Bible have Scripture scholars talking a blue streak... and one entrepreneur turning talk into action toys.

New Year's parties are not hard to find
Here's the lowdown on some of the other New Year's Eve events going on around town tonight: Jazz and swing dance fans can celebrate at the Millennium Gala at the Sacred Heart Cultural Center, 1301 Greene St. The evening, which starts at 9 p.m., features local outfits All That Jazz and the big band Sophisticated Swing, directed by saxophonist Wayne Hoey.

Time of renewal
Pope John Paul II and other Christian leaders have declared 2000 a Jubilee Year.

Musical showcases composer's best works
Although she sings his songs night after night, Amy Persons can't pinpoint why the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber is so popular.

Studies suggest religion benefits health
A growing body of evidence suggests religion can be good medicine. New findings seem to emerge every other month: regular churchgoers live longer. Prayer helps heart patients. A strong faith can help people cope with depression, drug abuse -- even cancer.

In 2000, have faith in God's promises
As we come to the end of 2000 years since the birth of Jesus Christ, there is much apprehension about the future because of the possibility of Y2K problems.

It's time to party
Ready or not, it's here. And as Prince (when he was Prince) predicted a number of years ago -- much of the world is gonna party tonight -- because it's the last night of 1999.

Gardening has changed over the past 100 years
What would happen, on top of all the other Y2K end-of-the-millennium worries, if some unforeseen snafu caused us to go back a hundred years? Imagine gardening as our great-great grandparents did in 1899.

Christmas trees don't have to be thrown away
What do you do with your Christmas tree? Hopefully you will put it to good use in some way. Most folks take their tree to a recycling pickup point, where they're taken to Thurmond Lake and put in the water for fish habitat.

Garden spaces
What do you want your garden to do besides grow plants? Should it hide you from the world or bring you closer to nature?

Fishing tournament information

Loon-gull combinations lead to anglers to fish catches

Brentwood comes from behind to beat Prep

Aiken High girls, Richland boys win

Lynx drop sixth straight

Hurricanes cancel Primeau trade

Owner: Tkachuk's salary made Primeau deal unattractive

Vernon goes to Florida in three-way deal

Lynx trade Piersol to Greensboro

Best-laid plans often go awry
The politician, the bureaucrat and the scientist emerged from a side room to face the lights of a crowded news conference.

Former deputy killed by police after standoff
Sheriff's deputies say they were forced to shoot a former deputy after a standoff at a Martinez home Thursday morning. Investigators gathered evidence from the front lawn Thursday at the 3962 Willowood Road home where the shooting took place. The victim was identified as Scott A. Mauro, 33, a former Columbia County deputy, military police officer and Sardis police officer. He was shot about 1 a.m. as he approached members of the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Special Response Team with a loaded double-barrel 12-gauge shotgun pointed at them, deputies said. Full story -- The Augusta Chronicle

Columbine massacre darkest news of violent year

Gardening has changed over the past 100 years

Toymaker brings ethnicity to Bible

Christmas trees don't have to be thrown away

Ramblin' Rhodes: Country stars have plenty to say

It's time to party

In 2000, have faith in God's promises

Musical showcases composer's best works

Studies suggest religion benefits health

Garden spaces

New Year's parties are not hard to find

Time of renewal

Wilson autopsy yields no clues

Party's over, but you get a second chance

Party's over, but you get a second chance
How was the party? Most likely your night didn't work out exactly like you planned. Few New Year's Eve parties ever do.

Officials increase patrols

Readers pick the century's top stories
Here is how readers of The Augusta Chronicle ranked the top 10 local stories of the 20th century:

Safety officials see few difficulties

Safety officials see few difficulties
Staff writers Sylvia Cooper and Heidi Coryell<

4 cited in police alcohol sting

Services mark new century

Former deputy killed by police after standoff

Services mark new century
With less than 12 hours remaining before 2000, the Rev. Allan J. McDonald added a millennial flair to Friday's Mass at the Church of the Most Holy Trinity.

Planned track hearing noise from residents

Capture new year forever

Georgia considers dam suit

Y2K ready?

Details final for local parties

Crowds gather on Broad St. to ring in millenium
Augustans didn't wait until the hour was late to celebrate the new year.

Officers kill ex-deputy

Y2K ready?
Kenneth Newbegin couldn't stock gallons of water fast enough Thursday at the Bi-Lo grocery store off Wrightsboro Road.

Party's over, but you get a second chance

Across the area: CSX approves use of new rail switches
CSX Transportation Systems finally has approved the use of remote-controlled switches that should give motorists relief from long waits at railroad crossings downtown, said Augusta Commissioner Stephen Shepard.

Snake lover seeks to preserve indigenous reptile

Party's over, but you get a second chance
How was the party? Most likely your night didn't work out exactly like you planned. Few New Year's Eve parties ever do.

Activities allow children to ring in new year early

Leaders predict growth in 2000
Community leaders in Richmond, Aiken, Columbia and Edgefield counties were asked to give their predictions for 2000. Here is what they see in Augusta's future:

Changing baby
Carita Thorpe (left), 13, of Aiken changes a doll's diaper while nurse Lauren Harris instructs during a Thursday baby-sitting class at Aiken Regional Medical Centers. Young people who completed the class were certified by the American Red Cross.

Leaders predict growth in 2000

Downtown activities help swing in 2000

Corrections

Dogs enter 2000 with optimism

New Year's song remains ingrained in public mind

Wilson autopsy yields no clues
GRANITEVILLE -- The body of Tiffaney Shereese Wilson was so badly decomposed that toxicology tests will be performed to determine what happened to the teen-ager after she disappeared from a grocery store parking lot Dec. 4.

Across the area: CSX approves use of new rail switches

Details final for local parties
Planners made final preparations Thursday for the New Year's Eve celebration they hope will be one of the largest events in downtown Augusta's history.

Downtown activities help swing in 2000
They were rocking at the Riverfront and swinging at Sacred Heart Cultural Center on Friday, counting down the hours to a new year.

Officers kill ex-deputy
Columbia County Sheriff Clay Whittle said his deputies did the right thing when they shot and killed a former officer at a Martinez home early Thursday.

New center director to focus on key roads
Andy Crosson couldn't even get an interview the first time he applied for a job at the CSRA Regional Development Center after graduating from college six years ago. Now the 31-year-old is running the place.

Religious sect plans gala event
ATHENS, Ga. -- More than 1,000 members of a quasi-religious sect led by a man who has claimed to be from another galaxy -- and has said ships will descend from the sky in 2003 to claim a selected 144,000 people for ``rebirth'' -- are expected to be at the Classic Center in downtown Athens today for a private New Year's Eve observance.

Activities allow children to ring in new year early
Long before the lines began to form at concession stands and well before local bands began filling Broad Street with music, a segment of Augusta's population already had begun its Y2K celebrations at the Celebrate 2000 New Year's Eve Street Party.

Georgia considers dam suit
After 11 years on the sidelines, Georgia plans to enter the legal battle between the Army Corps of Engineers and the state of South Carolina over fish kills caused by Russell Dam's reversible turbines.

Safety officials see few difficulties

Capture new year forever
Got big plans for New Year's? Expecting some unusual adventures?

Corrections
An article in Thursday's edition of The Augusta Chronicle contained incorrect information about cab service for those too intoxicated to drive on New Year's Eve. Radio Cab will provide the service at a cost. The pickup location will be at the corner of 10th and Ellis streets.

Emergency landing
Bystanders examine a four-seat plane whose landing gear collapsed Thursday after the pilot made an emergency landing at Thomson-McDuffie Airport. Augusta surgeon George Lionel Zumbro said the engine quit at 7,000 feet on a test flight from Daniel Field to Thomson.

Officials increase patrols
This New Year's Eve, driving drunk will be a whole lot riskier.

4 cited in police alcohol sting
Four Columbia County businesses were cited Thursday in a police sting investigation targeting sale of alcohol to minors.

Downtown activities help swing in 2000
They were rocking at the Riverfront and swinging at Sacred Heart Cultural Center on Friday, counting down the hours to a new year.

Celebrants bring merrymaking downtown

Crowds gather on Broad St. to ring in millenium
Augustans didn't wait until the hour was late to celebrate the new year.

Celebrants bring merrymaking downtown
In a flurry of pyrotechnics and a rain of paper streamers and confetti, the new year in downtown Augusta was greeted by the pop of fireworks and the cheers of thousands as the Celebrate 2000 New Year's Eve Street Party drew to a close.

Augusta's century: Race, river shaped history
It is at the heart of Augusta, tracing its winding path through history, framing thoughts and attitudes during the past century -- from the minute Alex Whitney, a white man, was killed by William B. Wilson, a black man, on a streetcar in 1900, to the waning days of the century when the 1998 mayoral election was decided along racial lines.

Across the area: Two groups to join economic boycott
COLUMBIA -- A national group of lawmakers and the foundation sponsoring an annual conference for black men have agreed to join the NAACP in its economic boycott of South Carolina.

Water, gas sell fast day before rollover
It wasn't the mad rush most people expected. Still, hoards of wary local residents continued stockpiling provisions such as bottled water, canned foods, batteries and gasoline as the last hours of 1999 ticked away.

Stockade has gone to dogs
Augusta Mayor Bob Young signed a five-year lease Friday turning over the old city stockade at Lake Olmstead to the CSRA Humane Society.

Water, gas sell fast day before rollover

New center director to focus on key roads
Andy Crosson couldn't even get an interview the first time he applied for a job at the CSRA Regional Development Center after graduating from college six years ago. Now the 31-year-old is running the place.

New center director to focus on key roads

Planned track hearing noise from residents
For more than a year, the speedway sat empty and quiet, all but a forgotten relic of Augusta's rich past in stock car racing.

Across the area: Two groups to join economic boycott

Snake lover seeks to preserve indigenous reptile
MIDWAY, Ga. -- Tim Lane hopes diamondbacks will be forever in southeast Georgia.

Y2K arrives in Augusta with few glitches

Crowds gather on Broad St. to ring in millenium

Stockade has gone to dogs

Augusta's century: Race, river shaped history

Emergency landing

Across the area: Two groups to join economic boycott

Changing baby

Snake lover seeks to preserve indigenous reptile
MIDWAY, Ga. -- Tim Lane hopes diamondbacks will be forever in southeast Georgia.

Activities allow children to ring in new year early
Long before the lines began to form at concession stands and well before local bands began filling Broad Street with music, a segment of Augusta's population already had begun its Y2K celebrations at the Celebrate 2000 New Year's Eve Street Party.

Planned track hearing noise from residents

Y2K arrives in Augusta with few glitches
The biggest worries at Georgia Power Co.'s operations headquarters Friday night were typical -- annoying squirrels and careless drivers, not Y2K.

Y2K arrives in Augusta with few glitches

Across the area: Two groups to join economic boycott
COLUMBIA -- A national group of lawmakers and the foundation sponsoring an annual conference for black men have agreed to join the NAACP in its economic boycott of South Carolina.

Readers pick the century's top stories

Stockade has gone to dogs
Augusta Mayor Bob Young signed a five-year lease Friday turning over the old city stockade at Lake Olmstead to the CSRA Humane Society.

Activities allow children to ring in new year early

Planned track hearing noise from residents
For more than a year, the speedway sat empty and quiet, all but a forgotten relic of Augusta's rich past in stock car racing.

Snake lover seeks to preserve indigenous reptile

Downtown activities help swing in 2000

Safety officials see few difficulties
Staff writers Sylvia Cooper and Heidi Coryell

Y2K arrives in Augusta with few glitches
The biggest worries at Georgia Power Co.'s operations headquarters Friday night were typical -- annoying squirrels and careless drivers, not Y2K.

Mills hits trey to edge Hawks

Gugliotta hopes he provides lesson for others

Test shows Carruth is father of baby

Future clouded for two 49er greats

Glenn withdraws appeal

Rams have two top candidates for MVP

Mrs. Tiffaney Wilson
JACKSON -- Mrs. Tiffaney Turner Wilson, 17, of Cowden Street, died.

Mrs. Ruth Williams
THOMSON -- Mrs. Ruth D. Williams, 64, of North Street, died Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Roy Smith
JACKSON -- Mr. Roy N. Smith, 44, of Burroughs Road, died Monday, Dec. 27, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Helen Napier
Mrs. Helen Saxon Napier, 71, of Cactus Trail, Martinez, died Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Alvin McCauley Jr.
Mr. Alvin L. McCauley Jr., 37, of Moseley Road, died Thursday, Dec. 30, 1999, at Sanders Personal Care Home.

Mrs. Louise Jeffers
HEPHZIBAH -- Mrs. Louise Friese Jeffers, 72, of Allendale Court, died Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1999, at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center.

Mrs. Dovie Wiggins
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Mrs. Dovie Barksdale Wiggins, 95, of Aylesbury Lane, died Tuesday, Dec. 28, 1999, at Washington Regional Medical Center.

Mr. Joel Deaton
Mr. Joel Franklin Deaton, 90, of Evans, died Friday, Dec. 31, 1999, at Westwood Nursing Home.

Miss Joni Youmans
BELLEVILLE, Kan. -- Miss Joni Lee Youmans, 17, died Tuesday, Dec. 28, 1999.

Mr. James Patterson Jr.
JERSEY CITY, N.J. -- Mr. James C. Patterson Jr., 58, died Sunday, Dec. 26, 1999.

Miss Mary Hallinan
Miss Mary Patricia Hallinan, 79, died Friday, Dec. 30, 1999, at St. Joseph Hospital.

Rev. Alonzo Green
VIDETTE, Ga. -- Rev. Alonzo Green, of Georgia Highway 305, died Saturday, Dec. 25, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Sylvia Davis
NEW YORK -- Mrs. Sylvia Buckner Davis, 57, of Erdman Place, Bronx, died Tuesday, Dec. 28, 1999, at Mount Sinai Hospital.

Mrs. Delores Gary
THOMSON -- Mrs. D. Delores Gary, 39, of Whiteoak Street, died Friday, Dec. 31, 1999, at the residence of her mother.

Mrs. Roseddie Dawkins
Mrs. Roseddie T. Dawkins, 74, of Davant Street, Martinez, died Thursday, Dec. 30, 1999, at University Hospital.

Mr. Lawrence Brinson
THOMSON -- Mr. Lawrence Cody ``L.C.'' Brinson, 44, of Old Milledgeville Road, died Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1999, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mr. Willie Holloway
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mr. Willie J. Holloway, 73, of Liberty Hill Road, died Tuesday, Dec. 28, 1999, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, Augusta.

Mrs. Martha Clark
WATERLOO, S.C. -- Mrs. Martha Wardell Clark, 73, of Oakwood Drive, died Thursday, Dec. 30, 1999.

Mr. William Jones Jr.
Mr. William S. ``Bill'' Jones Jr., 64, of Evans, died Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1999, at St. Joseph Hospital.

Mr. Loyd Cowart
WRENS, Ga. -- Mr. Loyd H. Cowart, 62, of Russell Street, died Thursday, Dec. 30, 1999, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

Mrs. Fannie Thomas
WAYNESBORO, Ga. -- Mrs. Fannie M. Thomas, of Quaker Road, died Sunday, Dec. 26, 1999, at Burke County Hospital.

Ammye Campbell
FAIRFAX, S.C. -- Mrs. Ammye Loadholt Campbell, a corporate officer with the family owned Fairfax Furniture Corp., died Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1999. She was 102.

Mrs. Jewell Riner
ADRIAN, Ga. -- Mrs. Jewell Kersey Riner, 85, died Friday, Dec. 31, 1999, at Macon Memorial Hospital, Macon.

Dalexia Rogers
THOMSON -- Dalexia S. Rogers, infant daughter of Stanley and Diane Rogers, died Tuesday, Dec. 28, 1999, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. William Jones Jr.

Mrs. Helen Napier

Mr. Loyd Cowart

Mr. Alvin McCauley Jr.

Mrs. Tiffaney Wilson

Mrs. Martha Clark

Mrs. Roseddie Dawkins

Dalexia Rogers

Mrs. Sylvia Davis

Mrs. Fannie Thomas

Mrs. Dovie Wiggins

Mr. James Patterson Jr.

Mrs. Ruth Williams

Mrs. Jewell Riner

Mr. Roy Smith

Mr. Lawrence Brinson

Mr. Joel Deaton

Miss Joni Youmans

Tom Hamilton
He was born in Columbia County in 1885 and graduated from Hephzibah High School in 1902. He became a reporter for the Augusta Herald in 1906 after attending Mercer University.

Tom Watson
One of America's greatest populist leaders, and one of the South's great orators and editorialists, is a native of Thomson. This deep thinker, scholar, author and historian served in the state legislature and was later elected to the U.S. Congress.

James Brown
He was born in poverty and became one of the richest men in show business. His unique dance steps, first exhibited in Augusta schools and theaters and on Augusta street corners, came to be copied by Michael Jackson.

20th Century Giants
Maybe it is the fertile clay and sand hills that undulate throughout the Central Savannah River Area. Maybe it is the life-giving waters of the river itself whispering its secrets in the ears of both the dreamers and the practical who live in the CSRA.

Oliver Hardy
There are probably few people in the history of comedy who have had such worldwide influence as he and his British-born partner, Stan Laurel.

20th Century Giants
Change and growth are the words that best sum up the 20th Century in the Central Savannah River Area.

Benjamin L. Dent and Richard A. Dent
The influence of these two brothers on city and state government is far-reaching. But, even greater, is the way they conducted themselves with dignity and intelligence through difficult times. They easily are two of the most-respected people who ever came out of Augusta's black community.

W.S. Morris III
In 1966, the 32-year-old son of William Morris became publisher of The Augusta Chronicle. Now the chief executive officer of Morris Communications Corp., Billy Morris took a handful of Georgia newspapers and expanded the company into a coast-to-coast operation of dailies, weeklies, community shoppers, national magazines and specialized publications.

Brenda Lee
Moving to Augusta was one of the best things that happened to Brenda Mae Tarpley, who was given her show business name ``Brenda Lee'' while performing in Augusta.

James Dyess
A sudden summer storm hit Sullivan's Island, S.C., in 1928 and a young Augusta man dived into violent waters to help rescue a woman caught in the surf.

Hervey Cleckley and Corbett Thigpen
These two Augusta psychiatrists first brought the mental disorder of multiple personalities to international public light with the publication of their best-selling book, The Three Faces of Eve.

Robert Greenblatt
This noted Augusta physician was internationally-known as an authority on sex and even published a book detailing the sex lives of historical figures.

J.B. Fuqua
Before this giant of Georgia broadcasting came along, there was no television in Augusta.

Peter Knox
It's hard to imagine what life in Augusta would be like without Sacred Heart Cultural Center, the scene of so many weddings, concerts and social and business functions.

J. Hampton Manning
Travelers who fly out of Augusta's Bush Field and Daniel Field airports owe a debt of thanks to Manning who died in 1996.

Lucius Pitts
This nationally-known educator established his reputation serving for 10 years as president of Miles College in Birmingham, Ala.

W.C. Ervin
This Darlington, S.C., native came to Augusta's Paine College in 1929 as business manager.

Randall Evans Jr.
When this resident of Thomson, Ga., died in 1986, he already had retired from the Georgia Court of Appeals after a distinguished career.

Erskine Caldwell
If nothing else, this author brought the nation's attention to the South -- especially to the Central Savannah River Area -- with his best known work, Tobacco Road.

Finds justice of sentencing system 'peculiar'
In your paper of Dec. 11 you reported a woman was sentenced to three years for killing a man while she was driving drunk.Arthur Balk, Jr., Augusta

Archibald Butt
He died a hero when the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank in 1912. He was an aide to President Teddy Roosevelt and when William Howard Taft became president in 1908, Major Archibald Butt continued with Taft.

Slams S.C. governor for apology
Gov. Jim Hodges is in trouble. First, he kicked a hornets nest when he tried to trade the Confederate Battle Flag for a Martin Luther King holiday. Milton Gresham, Evans

Clem Castleberry
This business entrepreneur came along at a time when the nation was just realizing it didn't have to buy just perishable food products but food could last for months using canned goods.

Roy V. Harris
The wily Augusta lawyer never became governor, but was a Georgia ``kingmaker'' for decades until his death in 1985. Harris' state base of power was as speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives -- until 1946 when he was defeated by Chronicle owner William Morris.

Ty Cobb
As a teen-ager, he came out of north Georgia to start his professional baseball career in 1904 playing for the Augusta Tourists. He soon was snapped up by the Detroit Tigers for which he played throughout his career, except for his last two seasons with the Philadelphia Athletics.

Clifford Roberts
The New York financier, along with golf legend Bobby Jones of Atlanta, put Augusta on the map in the world of golf. He and golf great Bobby Jones had a dream, and they formed a partnership with noted golf course designer Dr. Alistair Mackenzie to plan the Augusta National Golf Club and to establish the Master Golf Tournament.

C.T. Walker
He became one of the most famous orators of his day, black or white, and was called ``The Black Spurgeon'' because of his oratory skills. American giants such as industrialist John D. Rockefeller and U.S. President Howard Taft went to hear him preach.

Strom Thurmond
The longest-serving member of Congress, who was first elected to the U.S. Senate from South Carolina on a write-in vote in 1954, is an Army veteran (17 decorations, medals and awards), former judge, ex-governor and states' rights presidential candidate (1948). The Democrat-turned Republican put his stamp on modern American politics as the architect of the ``Southern strategy.''

Nancy Anderson
Several people changed how we enjoy the downtown area of the Savannah River in the 20th Century.

Solomon Blatt
`I've never betrayed their confidence and I never will.'' So said South Carolina state Rep. Solomon Blatt in 1985, at age 90, in explaining why Barnwell district voters sent the son of Russian Jewish immigrants to serve 53 years in the Palmetto State's General Assembly.

Pleasant Stovall
his Augustan became associate editor of The Augusta Chronicle before moving to Savannah in 1891 and establishing the Savannah Evening Press.

Joseph Lamar
This young next-door Augusta neighbor of Woodrow Wilson studied law here, was admitted to the Georgia bar in 1878 and practiced law in the Garden City until 1903.

Sherman Drawdy
One of Augusta's most prominent bankers of the 20th Century began his financial career as a bank clerk in Groveland, Fla., at the age of 17. He came to Augusta in 1936 as vice president and comptroller of Georgia Railroad Bank & Trust Co., then the oldest financial institution south of the nation's capital.

William Morris
From his boyhood days as an Augusta Herald carrier to his college years at the University of Georgia, Bill Morris had newspapering and crusading in his blood.

Louisa Mustin
Before her death in an Augusta hospital in 1976, she was regarded as a leading developer of Augusta's arts scene. She overcame polio as a child to graduate from Columbia University and study painting in France for five years.

Lucy Craft Laney
This modest, courageous persevering lady -- who established the forerunner of what is now Augusta's Lucy Laney High School -- is only one of three Georgia black citizens honored by having their portraits hung in Georgia's Capitol building.

Owen Cheatham
In the 1960s it was still possible to count on the fingers of one hand the real Cinderella corporations of America whose sage management and economic growth brought stockholders financial returns exceeding their wildest dreams.

Woodrow Wilson
The United States' 28th president, is considered to be the first American in the 20th century to be an international leader. Although Woodrow Wilson was born in Staunton, Va., his formative years were spent in Augusta.

Charles Walker
It was in 1982 when, overcoming a rocky political start, this young man was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives. But Charles Walker's political influence -- and his ability to help his community -- rose after becoming a state senator in 1990.

Carl Sanders
He was the only Augustan in the 20th Century to be elected governor of Georgia.

Randall Evans Jr.
When this resident of Thomson, Ga., died in 1986, he already had retired from the Georgia Court of Appeals after a distinguished career.

Brenda Lee
Moving to Augusta was one of the best things that happened to Brenda Mae Tarpley, who was given her show business name ``Brenda Lee'' while performing in Augusta.

Pleasant Stovall
his Augustan became associate editor of The Augusta Chronicle before moving to Savannah in 1891 and establishing the Savannah Evening Press.

Supports employees at animal shelter
I have read all the letters regarding the poor conditions and terrible employees at the Animal Control facility on Mack Lane. I have lived in this area for nearly 20 years and have been to the shelter several times and even adopted pets from there Jerri Strombeck, North Augusta

Joseph Lamar
This young next-door Augusta neighbor of Woodrow Wilson studied law here, was admitted to the Georgia bar in 1878 and practiced law in the Garden City until 1903.

Defends actions of chief, firefighters
After reading several articles concerning the recent fire at the Rivercreek Apartments, and thecriticism of Chief Ronnie Few and his firefighters, I can only shake my head in dismay. J.A. Malone, Dearing

J. Hampton Manning
Travelers who fly out of Augusta's Bush Field and Daniel Field airports owe a debt of thanks to Manning who died in 1996.

Canada perils U.S.
Americans would feel a lot less jittery heading into New Year's Eve celebrations if Canada had a rational immigration policy.

Hervey Cleckley and Corbett Thigpen
These two Augusta psychiatrists first brought the mental disorder of multiple personalities to international public light with the publication of their best-selling book, The Three Faces of Eve.

Commission fooled?
Augusta commissioners did a good job of putting together a budget for the coming year.

W.S. Morris III
In 1966, the 32-year-old son of William Morris became publisher of The Augusta Chronicle. Now the chief executive officer of Morris Communications Corp., Billy Morris took a handful of Georgia newspapers and expanded the company into a coast-to-coast operation of dailies, weeklies, community shoppers, national magazines and specialized publications.

Hits inconsistency of sentences
I am writing in response to the inconsistent sentencing that has been going on in Augusta. R.A. Brown, Augusta

Owen Cheatham
In the 1960s it was still possible to count on the fingers of one hand the real Cinderella corporations of America whose sage management and economic growth brought stockholders financial returns exceeding their wildest dreams.

Defends ballplayer's free speech rights
Hide behind the clause of free speech, columnist Rick Dorsey; we all hide behind the clause of free speech when we express our opinions! Jim Hartman, Aiken

Benjamin L. Dent and Richard A. Dent
The influence of these two brothers on city and state government is far-reaching. But, even greater, is the way they conducted themselves with dignity and intelligence through difficult times. They easily are two of the most-respected people who ever came out of Augusta's black community.

Defends 'agenda' of homosexuals
Your Dec. 21 editorial on ``Gay agenda stalled'' was consistent with your usual bigoted hate mongering ... Don Tate, Evans

J.B. Fuqua
Before this giant of Georgia broadcasting came along, there was no television in Augusta.

Slams S.C. governor for apology
Gov. Jim Hodges is in trouble. First, he kicked a hornets nest when he tried to trade the Confederate Battle Flag for a Martin Luther King holiday. Milton Gresham, Evans

Oliver Hardy
There are probably few people in the history of comedy who have had such worldwide influence as he and his British-born partner, Stan Laurel.

Finds justice of sentencing system 'peculiar'
In your paper of Dec. 11 you reported a woman was sentenced to three years for killing a man while she was driving drunk. Arthur Balk, Jr., Augusta

James F. Byrnes
He started his political career in Aiken as the court stenographer for South Carolina's 2nd Judicial Circuit. He studied law at night, passed the bar exam in 1903 and began practicing in Aiken.

Raps complaints about abandoned cars
It is people like letter-writer O. Rogers who are so shallow or hollow inside they don't allow reality to touch them. They have missed an important part of their life -- being human. Rev. M.E. Stokes, Augusta

Erskine Caldwell
If nothing else, this author brought the nation's attention to the South -- especially to the Central Savannah River Area -- with his best known work, Tobacco Road.

Says Dorsey needs "Logic 101"
Rick Dorsey, a fledgling sports columnist, has found a political football to kick around. Faber Hance, North Augusta

Roy V. Harris
The wily Augusta lawyer never became governor, but was a Georgia ``kingmaker'' for decades until his death in 1985. Harris' state base of power was as speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives -- until 1946 when he was defeated by Chronicle owner William Morris.

Rip Braves' Rocker for comments
While I agree in principle that Atlanta Braves pitcher John Rocker has the right to say whatever he wants, and while I agree that he has the right to earn a living, I also have the right not to support his way of living. If he cannot respect those who make his millionaire salary possible, why should I patronize his team?Luis R. Scott, Grovetown

Solomon Blatt
`I've never betrayed their confidence and I never will.'' So said South Carolina state Rep. Solomon Blatt in 1985, at age 90, in explaining why Barnwell district voters sent the son of Russian Jewish immigrants to serve 53 years in the Palmetto State's General Assembly.

Defends Animal Control chief
Recent comments by Mary Kathleen Blanchard and other letter writers to your publication are wrong about Jim Larmer.Dale Brown, Hephzibah

Woodrow Wilson
The United States' 28th president, is considered to be the first American in the 20th century to be an international leader. Although Woodrow Wilson was born in Staunton, Va., his formative years were spent in Augusta.

Hits decommissioning Lock and Dam
Now that we have a date that the so-called ``test'' will be run to decide if the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam should be decommissioned, as citizens we should get together to stop this tragedy. Jim Drew, Augusta

Louisa Mustin
Before her death in an Augusta hospital in 1976, she was regarded as a leading developer of Augusta's arts scene. She overcame polio as a child to graduate from Columbia University and study painting in France for five years.

Bashes stand on homosexual rights
In response to the statement in the Dec. 21 editorial: ``If homosexuals are put on an `equal' level with heterosexuals, the former will naturally ask for the same benefits as the latter,'' I am shocked and outraged. Homosexuals are equal to heterosexuals and should be treated as such.Louis S. Schwartz, Augusta

Sherman Drawdy
One of Augusta's most prominent bankers of the 20th Century began his financial career as a bank clerk in Groveland, Fla., at the age of 17. He came to Augusta in 1936 as vice president and comptroller of Georgia Railroad Bank & Trust Co., then the oldest financial institution south of the nation's capital.

1999's worst quotes
Each year we publish the worst, most biased quotes of the past year, as determined by 44 judges recruited by the press watchdog organization, Media Research Center, headed by L. Brent Bozell.

Tom Hamilton
He was born in Columbia County in 1885 and graduated from Hephzibah High School in 1902. He became a reporter for the Augusta Herald in 1906 after attending Mercer University.

Says Dorsey needs "Logic 101"
Rick Dorsey, a fledgling sports columnist, has found a political football to kick around. Faber Hance, North Augusta

Nancy Anderson
Several people changed how we enjoy the downtown area of the Savannah River in the 20th Century.

Rip Braves' Rocker for comments
While I agree in principle that Atlanta Braves pitcher John Rocker has the right to say whatever he wants, and while I agree that he has the right to earn a living, I also have the right not to support his way of living. If he cannot respect those who make his millionaire salary possible, why should I patronize his team?Luis R. Scott, Grovetown

C.T. Walker
He became one of the most famous orators of his day, black or white, and was called ``The Black Spurgeon'' because of his oratory skills. American giants such as industrialist John D. Rockefeller and U.S. President Howard Taft went to hear him preach.

Defends Animal Control chief
Recent comments by Mary Kathleen Blanchard and other letter writers to your publication are wrong about Jim Larmer.Dale Brown, Hephzibah

Ty Cobb
As a teen-ager, he came out of north Georgia to start his professional baseball career in 1904 playing for the Augusta Tourists. He soon was snapped up by the Detroit Tigers for which he played throughout his career, except for his last two seasons with the Philadelphia Athletics.

Hits decommissioning Lock and Dam
Now that we have a date that the so-called ``test'' will be run to decide if the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam should be decommissioned, as citizens we should get together to stop this tragedy. Jim Drew, Augusta

Clem Castleberry
This business entrepreneur came along at a time when the nation was just realizing it didn't have to buy just perishable food products but food could last for months using canned goods.

Bashes stand on homosexual rights
In response to the statement in the Dec. 21 editorial: ``If homosexuals are put on an `equal' level with heterosexuals, the former will naturally ask for the same benefits as the latter,'' I am shocked and outraged. Homosexuals are equal to heterosexuals and should be treated as such.Louis S. Schwartz, Augusta

Archibald Butt
He died a hero when the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank in 1912. He was an aide to President Teddy Roosevelt and when William Howard Taft became president in 1908, Major Archibald Butt continued with Taft.

1999's worst quotes
Each year we publish the worst, most biased quotes of the past year, as determined by 44 judges recruited by the press watchdog organization, Media Research Center, headed by L. Brent Bozell.

Tom Watson
One of America's greatest populist leaders, and one of the South's great orators and editorialists, is a native of Thomson. This deep thinker, scholar, author and historian served in the state legislature and was later elected to the U.S. Congress.

Peter Knox
It's hard to imagine what life in Augusta would be like without Sacred Heart Cultural Center, the scene of so many weddings, concerts and social and business functions.

James Brown
He was born in poverty and became one of the richest men in show business. His unique dance steps, first exhibited in Augusta schools and theaters and on Augusta street corners, came to be copied by Michael Jackson.

Robert Greenblatt
This noted Augusta physician was internationally-known as an authority on sex and even published a book detailing the sex lives of historical figures.

Strom Thurmond
The longest-serving member of Congress, who was first elected to the U.S. Senate from South Carolina on a write-in vote in 1954, is an Army veteran (17 decorations, medals and awards), former judge, ex-governor and states' rights presidential candidate (1948). The Democrat-turned Republican put his stamp on modern American politics as the architect of the ``Southern strategy.''

James Dyess
A sudden summer storm hit Sullivan's Island, S.C., in 1928 and a young Augusta man dived into violent waters to help rescue a woman caught in the surf.

Clifford Roberts
The New York financier, along with golf legend Bobby Jones of Atlanta, put Augusta on the map in the world of golf. He and golf great Bobby Jones had a dream, and they formed a partnership with noted golf course designer Dr. Alistair Mackenzie to plan the Augusta National Golf Club and to establish the Master Golf Tournament.

20th Century Giants
Change and growth are the words that best sum up the 20th Century in the Central Savannah River Area.

Doug Barnard Jr.
In 1976 the Augusta banker was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He soon was at odds with his Democratic Party leadership, and later co-founded a conservative ``Boll Weevil'' caucus that voted for President Reagan's tax cuts and defense buildup.

20th Century Giants
Maybe it is the fertile clay and sand hills that undulate throughout the Central Savannah River Area. Maybe it is the life-giving waters of the river itself whispering its secrets in the ears of both the dreamers and the practical who live in the CSRA.

Lucy Craft Laney
This modest, courageous persevering lady -- who established the forerunner of what is now Augusta's Lucy Laney High School -- is only one of three Georgia black citizens honored by having their portraits hung in Georgia's Capitol building.

Lucius Pitts
This nationally-known educator established his reputation serving for 10 years as president of Miles College in Birmingham, Ala.

Charles Walker
It was in 1982 when, overcoming a rocky political start, this young man was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives. But Charles Walker's political influence -- and his ability to help his community -- rose after becoming a state senator in 1990.

Carl Sanders
He was the only Augustan in the 20th Century to be elected governor of Georgia.

W.C. Ervin
This Darlington, S.C., native came to Augusta's Paine College in 1929 as business manager.

William Morris
From his boyhood days as an Augusta Herald carrier to his college years at the University of Georgia, Bill Morris had newspapering and crusading in his blood.

Overtime: Penn State loses star to NFL draft

Tiger has birthday to forget

Security tight wherever world's best golfer plays

Trains, elevators to halt as millennium arrives
As fireworks explode, revelers exult and the crystal ball descends in Times Square, the Boston mass transit system will mark the arrival of the new millennium by ... grinding to a halt.

Internet operators watch for Y2K bug
NEW YORK -- Web site operators and people who run computer systems will be watching for more than the Y2K bug on New Year's Eve: They will be on guard for viruses and other mischief spread by hackers looking for some start-of-the-millennium attention.

Y2K bugs may linger after Jan. 1 passes
NEW YORK -- Y2K computer worries won't go away this weekend, even if nothing goes wrong. Glitches are likely weeks, even months, into the new year. And a few may linger until 2001 and beyond.

Internet-shy Japan finds route to Web
through cell phones Online revolution could put Japan on fore of cyberspace, opening important technical front

New nuclear weapons agency chief sought
WASHINGTON -- Energy Secretary Bill Richardson named a high-level search committee Thursday to recommend candidates to head the department's new nuclear weapons agency.

Automakers, Internet companies announce partnerships
DETROIT -- The world's two largest automakers announced new alliances with Internet companies Sunday, the latest in a string of deals between the online world and major corporations.

Government steps up Y2K safeguards
WASHINGTON -- While most Americans appeared unfazed by possible Y2K failures, the government took further precautions Thursday, closing seaports for the New Year's weekend on both coasts and repairing a last-minute bug in a key air traffic computer.

Doctors remove woman's 200-pound tumor
CHICAGO -- In a surgery considered almost impossible to peform, doctors at the University of Chicago removed a fast-growing, 200-pound tumor from a woman's abdomen.

Microsoft, Barnes & Noble to provide e-books
SEATTLE -- Microsoft Corp. and Barnes & Noble Inc. plan to develop and market electronic books using Microsoft's new ``ClearType'' technology.

Ultra-Orthodox rabbis ban Internet use
JERUSALEM -- Leading ultra-Orthodox Jewish rabbis have banned their followers from using the Internet out of concern that Web links may lead them into the profane.

Programmers double-check for last-minute Y2K bugs
WASHINGTON -- Programmers double-checking for computer bugs just days before the new year are playing a high-priced form of the whack-a-mole arcade game, stomping out pesky errors in government and business computers previously certified as Y2K-ready.

Y2K bugs may linger after Jan. 1 passes

Internet operators watch for Y2K bug

New nuclear weapons agency chief sought

Microsoft, Barnes & Noble to provide e-books

Programmers double-check for last-minute Y2K bugs

Trains, elevators to halt as millennium arrives

Government steps up Y2K safeguards