Northern Iowa tops Alabama

Mavericks end losing streak with win over Magic

Pistons top Sonics

Cremins putting 'heart and soul' into rebuilding Georgia Tech

Cavaliers retire Mark Price's number

Harrick takes on major rebuilding job at Georgia

Louisiana Tech snaps Lady Vols' home win streak

Plot lines aren't very practical

Business briefs: Chain funds cancer research
Hamrick's Inc., headquartered in Gaffney, S.C., donated $16,850 to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation in October in cooperation with Lee Co.'s National Denim Day. The Susan G. Komen Foundation is the nation's largest private institution dedicated solely to funding research for a breast cancer cure.

Pocket Change
Radio can make the miles whiz by on car trips, but finding a station you want to hear can be tough. Try Radio on the Road (Arrowhead Publishing; $14.95) to tune you in. The paperback book lists more than 15,000 AM and FM stations in the United States and Canada, from big-watt blasters to little-town talkers.

Temporary workers in demand
NEW YORK -- Hiring good ``temps'' is becoming a full-time job for many small business owners.

Temporary workers in demand

Carpet-recycling plant to open
Later this week, DSM Chemicals and AlliedSignal plan to crank up their $85 million Evergreen machine and start turning nasty old carpet into gold.

Carpet-recycling plant to open

Less volatile Bonds still have risks
NEW YORK -- When volatility hits the stock market, risk-adverse investors often turn to bonds as a safe haven, and now is no exception.

On the move
Thomas ``Branan'' Ruffin has joined R.W. Allen & Associates as project estimator.

Less volatile Bonds still have risks

Funds hope for better Cuban-U.S. relations
NEW YORK -- When -- or, more important, if -- trade reopens between the United States and Cuba, a handful of U.S. closed-end fund investors stand poised to capitalize on a potentially vibrant economy just 90 miles off the coast of Florida.

Pocket Change

Funds hope for better Cuban-U.S. relations

Business briefs: Chain funds cancer research

Georgia looks to boost movie location interest
ATLANTA -- Doubling the state's meager film-marketing budget and widening a few tax loopholes could boost the number of movies made in Georgia, says Michael Coles, who has switched from selling cookies and dabbling in politics to hawking film locations.

Duke tops Wake Forest

Alabama tops Mississippi St.

Arkansas upsets Tennessee

Auburn stuns Bulldogs

Tech out-duels Clemson

USC beginning to show positives

South Carolina notes

Gamecocks could be spoiler

Georgia football notes

Virginia Tech two wins from shot at national title

Michigan upsets Penn State

Tech's Hamilton has amazing game

A look at the 20th century: 1989
While the world looked toward a new decade, it ended 1989 with cause for hope as the most visible symbol of Communist oppression crumbled and the Cold War ended.

Shutters quicker than eye
Blink, and you miss it. A nuclear test is conducted in the early morning darkness. A firefighter reaches a 15-year-old girl who has been struggling in floodwaters nearly 45 minutes.

Norwood's victory

Urges building bigger, better library

Ponders liberal media and history

Asks questions about water drawdown

Looks forward to road improvements

Toughness needed in Illinois

Supports challenger in Dist. 2 runoff

Puzzles over S.C. flag controversy

Notes alternative old-fashioned homes

Good Hodges' tax idea

Wants convicted HIV felon's picture published

Defends Tax Assessor Sears

Millennium memories
Families wanting to share personal and historical items with future generations via a time capsule can do so without spending a lot of money.

In the know
TV TONIGHT: Basketball superstar Michael Jordan and that ``wascally'' rabbit Bugs Bunny team up as big screen buddies in th

Legends told of mystical fountain of youth
Before the European conquest of America, Caribbean legends told of a wondrous kingdom where people could drink from a stream and "live like young men" forever.

Love affair with house never ends
Tony and Terry Cresci sleep where honeymooners once frolicked. The Crescies' 3,000-square-foot home on Greene Street housed the honeymoon suites of Telfair Inns before it was sold at auction in 1994. When the Crescies bought and renovated their Victorian-style home in Olde Town in April 1998, they celebrated its rich history by capitalizing on its unique design. The couple's only regret is that more Augustans don't appreciate the historic neighborhood.

Invitation's wording is in doubt
Dear Carson: I work for a nonprofit organization and would like to send invitations for a dinner and social hour. Should I use the term ``social hour'' or ``cocktails at 6 p.m.''? Dinner will be at 7.

Common items best for capsules
With 1999 giving way to 2000 soon, time capsules are more popular than ever with businesses, churches and families wanting to share pieces of the present with the future.

Getting into Deep Step requires shallow thinking

Josey faces familiar foe in playoff opener

Lynx trade fan-favorite Rezansoff

Murray balks at reporting to Augusta following trade

Plot lines aren't very practical
One reason my wife doesn't like to watch movies with me is that I will sit there complaining when things don't make sense.``Why,'' I'll ask rhetorically, ``can Arnold Schwarzenegger beat up five guys in one scene, then actually have trouble punching out their evil, but puny little boss?''

Saving Greg: The surgery

Millennium memories

Common items best for capsules

Love affair with house never ends

Legends told of mystical fountain of youth

Saving Greg: After the surgery

Invitation's wording is in doubt

Saving Greg

Errors in state's death records hinder studies

Accounts reflect a race bias
AIKEN -- Before it became politically correct to eliminate most references to race in the last quarter of this century, newspaper accounts of the crimes, trials and executions reflected them through blatantly race-colored glasses.

Shutters quicker than eye

Teacher learned craft the hard way

Across the area
MondayThe deadline for annual property taxes in Columbia County is Monday.

Deputy punished in 'judge-shopping'
A Richmond County deputy is being punished for ``judge-shopping'' by the chief judge of Civil and Magistrate Court.

Kindness board gets rave reviews
A message board in Greenbrier High School provides a list of recent good deeds -- lending money to help pay for a class ring, lending a coat to a cold friend and helping push a golf cart up a hill.

SRS boosts internal security
Savannah River Site officials once concentrated on the threat of outsiders hacking into the more than 1,000 computer networks at the federal nuclear weapons site. Now, they are turning their efforts toward the inside.

The revival continues

The revival continues
ATHENS, Ga.-- Beth Stephens exchanged a hotel room for an apartment after what was supposed to be a one-week stop at a Clarke County church turned into a 28-week revival for the Griffin-based evangelist.

A look at the 20th century: 1989

Race plays into death penalty use
AIKEN -- From its racial composition, South Carolina's death row looks like equal-opportunity housing for killers. But mostly, rooms are reserved, as they always have been, for those whose victims were white.

Swinging for sweets
Christian Manly, 7, wallops a pinata, trying to get at the treats inside, during his 4-year-old sister's birthday party. The party was held Sunday at Creighton Park on Lake Avenue in North Augusta.Swinging for sweets

Aiken readies for races

Pilot uses highway for landing
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Forget about landing a plane in the middle of Interstate 20. That's the easy part for a fearless flier.

Downtown planning hinges on railways
JESUP, Ga. -- Business leaders here look at the potential expansion of intercity passenger rail service in Georgia from a different perspective than transportation planners.

Aiken readies for races
AIKEN -- Autumn-colored leaves and cold, crisp air remind Georgianna Conger of Aiken's last great sporting day of the year.

Officials to review rail plan
Officials to review rail plan State Transportation Board takes up $1.5 billion propostal to link Georgia cities with commuter lines

Kindness board gets rave reviews

Council to weigh limit on horses in neighborhoods

Pilot uses highway for landing

Council to weigh limit on horses in neighborhoods
AIKEN -- Buzz Jackson might invest in a sturdy pair of paddock shoes before Monday, when the horse manure could get ankle deep for the Aiken planning commissioner.

Technician pays dues as rodeo clown

Traffic blamed on design
Ten years ago, L.D. Waters bought property off Bobby Jones Expressway near Scott Nixon Memorial Drive and opened Bonaventure Discount Golf.

Deputy punished in 'judge-shopping'

Plazas reflect local viability
For 16 years, Laverne Mock has watched the rise and fall of Columbia Square shopping plaza. The once-booming retail spaces -- wedged between Columbia and Washington roads on Flowing Wells Road in Martinez -- have fizzled in recent years.

Race plays into death penalty use

Psychologist gives parents rearing tips
He blames the media. He blames authors. He blames his fellow mental health professionals. John Rosemond, nationally syndicated child psychologist, blames just about everyone and everything -- from the invention of color television to parenting books -- for the way children are being reared in the United States today.

Traffic blamed on design

Across the area

Area briefs: Police call child's injury accident
A weekend incident that critically injured a 7-year-old Augusta girl was ruled an accident Sunday by Richmond County investigators.

SRS boosts internal security

Teacher learned craft the hard way
Lisa Griffin Arnold has a passion for the first-year teacher. She vividly remembers teaching her first class, 14 years ago, at Academy of Richmond County High School: She wanted to quit.

Court case puts clubs in middle
ATHENS, Ga. -- From Bible study clubs to pagan support groups, student organizations produce a cacophony of free speech on college campuses each day.

Technician pays dues as rodeo clown
With a 750-pound bull snorting all over her back, Karen Blaker just lay there, eating the dirt of the rodeo ring. Then she made the mistake of trying to get up. Dagger, the young bull, nailed her in the back.

Plazas reflect local viability

Errors in state's death records hinder studies
AIKEN -- South Carolina's execution records are in such dismal disarray that they hamper serious research on capital punishment cases in the state.

Area briefs: Police call child's injury accident

Officials to review rail plan

Puppets assist educator's call to teach pupils
When people asked Carlyn G. Morris what she wanted to be when she grew up, she knew positively she did not want to be a teacher.

Court case puts clubs in middle

Psychologist gives parents rearing tips

Puppets assist educator's call to teach pupils

NFL preview

Colts tie for AFC East lead

Rams rebound to beat Carolina

Aikman might miss next three Cowboys games

Falcons take needed break

49ers suspend Phillips

Super Flops: Falcons turn out to be a one-year wonder

Cleveland snatches win from Steelers

Mr. Arthur Youmans
ALLENDALE, S.C. -- Mr. Arthur Youmans, 76, of Moore Street, died Thursday, Nov. 11, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Eunice Booth
EDGEFIELD, S.C. -- Mrs. Eunice Turner Booth, 85, of Country Manor Apartments, died Sunday, Nov. 14, 1999, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Marvin Axon
THOMSON -- Mr. Marvin Axon, 82, of Mount Pleasant Road, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at Thomson Manor.

Rev. Jack Gardner
SAVANNAH -- The Rev. Jack R. Gardner, 79, died Friday, Nov. 12, 1999, in Hospice House, Savannah.

Mrs. Azalee Wynne
Mrs. Azalee ``Dixie'' Wynne, 74, of Augusta, died Friday, Nov. 12, 1999, at Wills Memorial Hospital, Washington, Ga.

Mrs. Mozella Wilcher
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Mrs. Mozella Wilcher, 62, died Tuesday, Nov. 9, 1999, at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mrs. Iris Pinkney
LOS ANGELES -- Mrs. Iris Pinkney died Thursday, Nov. 11, 1999, at Martin Luther King Jr. Hospital.

Mrs. Maggie Drayton
Mrs. Maggie Drayton, of Laney-Walker Boulevard, died Friday, Nov. 12, 1999, at St. Joseph Hospital.

Mrs. Mildred Armstrong
Mrs. Mildred M. Armstrong, 85, of Greene Street, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at St. Joseph Hospital.

Mrs. Marion Hatcher
Mrs. Marion Harris Hatcher died Sunday, Nov. 14, 1999, at University Hospital.

Mr. J.B. Battle Jr.
HEPHZIBAH -- Mr. J.B. Battle Jr., 64, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at St. Joseph Hospital.

Mrs. Rachel Cushman
AIKEN -- Mrs. Rachel Newsome Cushman, of Gray Mare Hollow Road, died Sunday, Nov. 14, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Norman Flanders
ADRIAN, Ga. -- Mr. Norman Flanders, 90, of Alton Lawson Road, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at Bulloch Memorial Hospital, Statesboro.

Mr. Carroll Simmons
SPRINGFIELD -- Mr. Carroll R. Simmons, 71, of Egypt-Ardmore Road, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at Hospice Savannah.

Mr. Robert Sweet
WILLISTON, S.C. -- Mr. Robert Glen Sweet, 52, of Herbert Lane, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mr. Sebron Mitchell
Mr. Sebron Mitchell, 92, of Roulette Lane, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at Windemere Health and Rehabilitation Center.

Mrs. Dora Scott
Mrs. Dora Washington Scott, of Turpin Street, died Wednesday, Nov. 10, 1999, at her residence.

Mrs. Julia Freeman
TIGNALL, Ga. -- Mrs. Julia Estelle Huguley Freeman, 81, of Euel Saggus Road, died Sunday, Nov. 14, 1999, at Wills Memorial Hospital, Washington.

Mrs. Nannie Reviere
LINCOLNTON, Ga. -- Mrs. Nannie Lou Cliatt Reviere, 88, of Dallas Street, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at Thomson Manor.

Mr. W.L. Forehand
HILTONIA, Ga. -- Mr. W.L. Forehand, 89, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at Parkwood Nursing Home, Snellville.

Mrs. Claudie Samples
SWAINSBORO, Ga. -- Mrs. Claudie Tapley Samples, 94, of Lewis Street, died Saturday, Nov. 13, 1999, at her residence.

Mrs. Lois Johnson
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mrs. Lois E. Johnson, 71, died Sunday, Nov. 14, 1999, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Taylor Bruner
BELVEDERE -- Mr. C. Taylor Bruner, 29, of Serpentine Drive, died Friday, Nov. 12, 1999, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Claudie Samples

Mrs. Eunice Booth

Mrs. Nannie Reviere

Mr. Marvin Axon

Mr. Robert Sweet

Mrs. Azalee Wynne

Mrs. Mildred Armstrong

Mrs. Dora Scott

Mr. Sebron Mitchell

Mr. Arthur Youmans

Mrs. Julia Freeman

Rev. Jack Gardner

Mrs. Rachel Cushman

Mr. Norman Flanders

Mr. W.L. Forehand

Mr. Taylor Bruner

Mrs. Lois Johnson

Mr. J.B. Battle Jr.

Mrs. Iris Pinkney

Mr. Carroll Simmons

Kent: Barnes upset; McCain grumbles; wrong bark
My friend the governor of Georgia, Roy Barnes, is upset with me. I didn't hear it directly from him. I'll give him a call tomorrow. But this news springs from a long-awaited Atlanta summit last Monday between the governor, State School Superintendent Linda Schrenko, House Minority Leader Bob Irvin, R-Atlanta, state Rep. Tom Price, R-Roswell, Education Reform Commission Chairman Otis Brumby and Commission member Oz Nelson.

MCG restructuring needed to accomplish mission
AS THE individual responsible for the educational programs of the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, I was surprised by the opinions expressed by Dr. Paul Webster in his Nov. 2 guest column. Dr. Webster asserts that restructuring the MCG Hospital and Clinics, under the 501(c)(3) not-for-profit model of MCG Health, may have a negative impact on the education and patient care missions and that this issue has been inadequately submitted to public debate. He is incorrect in both of these assertions.

Toughness needed in Illinois
What a comedown for the Rev. Jesse Jackson: from global statesman to rabble-rouser.

Good Hodges' tax idea
Gov. Jim Hodges has come up with an unusual proposal to save South Carolinians substantial money at ``back-to-school'' time each year.

Defends Tax Assessor Sears
I have known Richmond County Tax Assessor Harrison Sears for more than 15 years. I have never heard or known him to be prejudiced or ``racial.'' If you're wrong, you're wrong no matter what color or sex you are. Charles Nutt, Hephzibah

Blasts flying of Confederate flag
In 1962, South Carolina legislators convened in the Statehouse regarding the federal government ordering the state and other Southern states to desegregate schools. It was seven years before this official act took place in Aiken and other surrounding counties. Some took this as an act similar to the Reconstruction era, when Northern Republican politicians, lawyers, educators and wealthy landowners preyed on the defeated South. The state lawmakers, in an act of defiance, voted to place the Confederate battle flag on top of the capitol dome. Some argue this gesture was done to honor the Confederate soldier who fought so gallantly 100 years earlier. Ernest Leysath, Augusta

Urges building bigger, better library
I am writing to express my concern about the Warren C. Gibbs Memorial Library in Columbia County. The facility does not have the space or the resources to serve its community properly. Cheri Noel Robinson, Augusta

Wants convicted HIV felon's picture published
In regard to the Oct. 27 ``Across the Area'' article concerning Amy Marie Johnson and her indictment for felony offense of reckless conduct by an HIV infected person, I'd like to propose the following: Butch McDaniel, Augusta

Ponders liberal media and history
... I remember that during the Clinton impeachment hearings it was very important to inspect Iraq in order to keep Saddam Hussein from making biological weapons of mass destruction. Well as soon as the flames cooled off, it hasn't been nearly as important to the liberal news media. Harry Oliphant, Hephzibah

MCG restructuring needed to accomplish mission
AS THE individual responsible for the educational programs of the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, I was surprised by the opinions expressed by Dr. Paul Webster in his Nov. 2 guest column. Dr. Webster asserts that restructuring the MCG Hospital and Clinics, under the 501(c)(3) not-for-profit model of MCG Health, may have a negative impact on the education and patient care missions and that this issue has been inadequately submitted to public debate. He is incorrect in both of these assertions.

Doubts motive of Nationwide directive
The article in the national news concerning Nationwide Insurance and the use of ``cheap parts'' is somewhat amusing. It states, ``It would temporarily stop allowing body shops to use cheap parts not made by manufacturers.'' W. Bowman, Hephzibah

Notes alternative old-fashioned homes
Re: the Nov. 7 article on ```Neo-Traditional' homes'': Liberty Perkins, Augusta

Denies 'Weekly Reader' link to tobacco
As president of Weekly Reader, I feel compelled to respond to Richard Arnold's errors in his Nov. 3 letter alleging some connection between Weekly Reader and a ``tobacco giant.'' Peter E. Bergen, Stamford, CT

Puzzles over S.C. flag controversy
I'm afraid I missed something in the argument over the Confederate flag. It's my understanding that the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is offended by ``a'' Confederate flag flying over the South Carolina Statehouse. So, because of the boycott, some South Carolina employees will have their convention in Augusta. If I'm not mistaken, the state flag of Georgia is two-thirds of a Confederate flag and flies not only at the Georgia Capitol, but at every state office, school, post office, and most hotels. Mary Fleiss, North Augusta

Supports challenger in Dist. 2 runoff
District 2 voters must return to the polls on Nov. 23. District 2 leads Richmond County in thenumber of public housing units -- not in the number of new housing. Yet we still suffered greatly from this summer's drought as we did last year. The promised health clinic for the Hyde Park residents is being built downtown, not in the neighborhood. Neighborhoods are being allowed to decline; that way more government sponsored entities can move in for little money. Rundown housing has little resale value when condemned for government use. In some of our neighborhoods, the drug dealers are so confident of non-arrest that they will accost anyone entering the neighborhood to buy their destructive wares. Davida L. Johnson, Augusta

McDill flying high
Last week Al McDill, director of the Augusta Regional Airport at Bush Field, had his contract renewed by the Augusta Aviation Commission. New Aviation Commission member Rodger Giles provided the one-vote margin to save McDill's job; it was five ayes, one opposed and three abstentions.

Plans to boycott 2000 census count
OK, let me get this straight: If I stand up to be counted for the 2000 census, I will be helping my community receive more federal dollars for housing, school lunches and etc., according to the commercial. Now let's look at the reality of the situation. I know three reasons why a lot of people won't be counted: William Sanders, Augusta

Asks questions about water drawdown
I am again writing about the planned Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam water drawdown because of the excellent letter you published by Paul L. Cook this week. I feel he used the right approach in writing to the key persons he listed. Harold F. Truchsess, Martinez

Looks forward to road improvements
I sure was glad to read that improvements are being planned for the Bobby Jones Expressway. It needs some. Robert H. Rihl, Augusta

Backs incumbent in District 2 runoff
... I care deeply for District 2 and Augusta-Richmond County as a whole. I have strong desires to see them continue to prosper and grow. James A. Payne, Augusta

Connects traffic violations, deaths at Columbine
I am so thankful that I have the ability and willingness to read speed limits signs. I am also thankful that I know where the brake and accelerator are and that I know how to operate both these in order to obey the speed limit law. I am thankful, too, that I know how to operate the turn signals and when to use them. Luther F. Yount Jr., Martinez

Norwood's victory
Whether Congress passes U.S. Rep. Charlie Norwood's patients' bill of rights legislation or not, the Georgia Republican can count his longtime campaign to reform managed care a success.

Kent: Barnes upset; McCain grumbles; wrong bark
My friend the governor of Georgia, Roy Barnes, is upset with me. I didn't hear it directly from him. I'll give him a call tomorrow. But this news springs from a long-awaited Atlanta summit last Monday between the governor, State School Superintendent Linda Schrenko, House Minority Leader Bob Irvin, R-Atlanta, state Rep. Tom Price, R-Roswell, Education Reform Commission Chairman Otis Brumby and Commission member Oz Nelson.

Peebles v. the people
The arrest of a Columbia County Sheriff's Department deputy accused of staging a series of break-ins and robberies to make himself look like an alert investigator cannot be viewed with bland complacency.

Overtime: Davenport and Hingis to meet in Advanta final

Jarrett and Yates celebrate title win

Duval, Couples extend lead in Shark Shootout

Lewis beats Holyfield with unanimous decision

Titleholders ready to move to Atlanta

Trinidad to fight Reid for title

Pak turns Tour Championship into headline

Report: Open FAA investigation of jet's owner

Report: Olympic officials received favors

Overtime: Davenport defeats Hingis for Advanta title

Balancing act

Lewis earns three titles, gets two belts

Pak wins LPGA title in playoff

Amateur event kicks off Georgia Field Trials

Jarrett wraps up championship; Stewart wins again

Saving Greg: Additional surgery needed
Delving into Greg's brain last time was a laborious process. Now it takes just minutes for Dr. Lee and Dr. Brown to cut through sutures holding the skull cap and peel back the layers underneath. The exposed brain is covered by small, dark blood clots.

Saving Greg: After the surgery
The bigger kids walk around Greg as he sits on the carpet in the music room, his head down, staring at the songbook in his lap. It is open to Song of the Skyloom, which tells of American Indian legends.

Saving Greg
Two million people walk through life never knowing when epileptic storms will assault their brains. Sometimes their desperate quest for freedom from seizures calls for the kind of bold approach doctors took with young Greg West.

Saving Greg: Progress fades
They all hide the scar somewhere beneath their hair as they mill about the crowded room, squeezing between folding tables and chairs, wandering among Halloween decorations and orange and black balloons.

Saving Greg: The recovery
Greg lies back in the bed at the epilepsy monitoring unit. The angry red scar on his head looks like a zipper. He gives a lopsided smile, only the right side of his face pulling up.

Saving Greg: The surgery
Inside the classroom, the little boy's head hovers near the desktop. His face turned to the right, he watches the pencil in his hand move slowly up and down on the paper.

Internet providers left out of satellite bill
WASHINGTON -- America Online and other Internet companies could be shut out of delivering local TV to their customers under a satellite TV bill passed by the House.

Electronic Santa's helpers available
I had a cyber-wish last Christmas. My sister and I were doing our annual elf routine, telephoning almost daily to report gifts we'd bought, thus avoiding duplication under our family tree.

Computer 'firewall' may be needed
Q: I am getting kind of jumpy about security with my new DSL connection.

Britannica site is relaunched
Chicago-based Britannica.com Inc., the online offspring of the venerable Encyclopedia Britannica, resurrected its Web site after an outage that lasted more than two weeks.

Beef grading system questioned by new findings
WASHINGTON -- Here's something for steak lovers to chew on: When it comes to that tough T-bone, consider going easy on the chef and cutting into the government.

Broadcasters, Internet groups in showdown over television licenses
WASHINGTON -- Online providers and leading copyright holders are in a showdown over legislative language that keeps Internet companies from getting special licenses to carry broadcast programming.

Newbies go shopping online
Internet users with less than six months of experience on the Web are more confident about shopping online this holiday season, and that should benefit Web sites associated with bricks-and-mortar stores.

Leonids storm to light up sky
Thirty-three Novembers ago, Joe Rao stood in his Bronx backyard, cursing the heavens.

Tobacco war veterans contemplate suing Microsoft
The lawyers who attacked Big Tobacco have discovered a new villain: Microsoft.

Broadcasters, Internet groups in showdown over television licenses

Computer 'firewall' may be needed

Tobacco war veterans contemplate suing Microsoft

Britannica site is relaunched

Leonids storm to light up sky

Beef grading system questioned by new findings

Newbies go shopping online

Electronic Santa's helpers available

Internet providers left out of satellite bill