Originally created 11/04/99

In the know



POKEMAN MANIA:

Legions of Pokemon fans will have new ways to satisfy their hunger Monday when Pokemon toys become part of Burger King's popular kid meals. Each of the 57 toys is packed in a Poke Ball and is accompanied by one of 151 trading cards Nintendo has partnered with Burger King for promotion in conjunction with the Nov. 10 release of Pokemon: The First Movie.

The promotion is scheduled to run through Dec. 31. To help kids "collect 'em all," some Burger King restaurants will have "trading nights" on four consecutive Tuesdays, beginning Nov. 23. No purchase is necessary.

The Pokemon phenomenon in America began in September 1998 with the release of the original Blue and Red Game Boy games and debut of the television series. More than 7 million Pokemon-related video games have been sold.

HOLIDAY CLASSIC:

The Augusta Players are holding an additional audition for Miracle on 34th Street. The cast requires children ages 6-12 and adults 18-80. The audition is Sunday at 3 p.m. in the National Hills Shopping Center on Washington Road, next to Dillard's department store. For more information, call 826-4707.

TV TONIGHT:

Fox gets into the game show frenzy, giving contestants a chance to win big bucks tonight with the premiere of Greed, The Multi-Million Dollar Challenge at 9. A potential $2 million payoff awaits as contestants challenge one another for the coveted cash. Chuck Woolery is the host.

Another new offering from Fox tonight is Celebrities Out of Control at 8. Celebs are caught off guard throwing tirades and fighting. Can this be a new franchise from the folks that gave us The World's Wildest Police Videos? Only if you tune in.

At 8 on on the Sci-Fi Channel, Scott Bakula, Kris Kristofferson, Brian Dennehy and Judge Reinhold star in Tom Clancy's Netforce a two-part miniseries that depicts the Internet as an irresistible target for exploitation in the year 2005.

A MAJOR UNDERTAKING:

Talk about being in a financial hole! A typical funeral and burial costs $8,000, making it one of the largest purchases most Americans will make, according to a report by the Congressional General Accounting Office. The report said the government lacks adequate oversight of funeral-industry practices.