GreenJackets lose, play for title tonight

GreenJackets season will soon end

Jones an MVP candidate

Victory will clinch SAL title

Even from afar, Floyd leaves mark on series

Pitcher eyes franchise record

Braves fall to Padres

Braves notebook: Millwood continues to impress

Workplace tension is on the rise

UAW, DaimlerChrysler reach tentative agreement
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- The United Auto Workers won annual 3 percent wage increases for four years in a tentative contract settlement reached Thursday with DaimlerChrysler, local union officials said.

SEC chairman says agency found abuses at day-trading firms

Industrial production continues slow climb

SITEL to open center
One of the country's largest telephone-based service companies announced Wednesday it would open a call center in Augusta that will eventually employ more than 500 people.

Project to bring trucks
A Tennessee-based company is building a 10-acre truck stop at the intersection of River Watch Parkway and Interstate 20. The company, Knoxville-based Pilot Travel Centers, said the development will employ more than 85 people when it opens in mid-December.

Businesses keep rates reasonable during storm

Business briefs: Industrial average tumbles 1 percent
Inflation rate falls to new low ... Automaker plans billions for cars ... Dime Bancorp to acquire Hudson

UAW, DaimlerChrysler reach tentative agreement

SITEL to open center

SEC chairman says agency found abuses at day-trading firms
WASHINGTON -- The nation's chief securities regulator told Congress Thursday that several day-trading firms have used deceptive advertising to lure investors into the risky practice of rapidly trading in and out of stock.

Industrial production continues slow climb
WASHINGTON -- Production at the nation's factories, mines and utilities rose for the seventh straight month in August, continuing slow recovery from a slump caused by economic turmoil abroad.

Project to bring trucks

Business briefs: Industrial average tumbles 1 percent

Businesses keep rates reasonable during storm
Supply and demand. The more a consumer needs something, the more businesses charge for it.

Bankruptcy lawyer writes on prevention

Additional business news
Dow minimizes loss after big early drop...Young puts out price-gouging alert...Lockheed-Comsat deal clears hurdle

SITEL to open center

SITEL to open center
One of the country's largest telephone-based service companies announced Wednesday it would open a call center in Augusta that will eventually employ more than 500 people.

Bankruptcy lawyer writes on prevention
Growing up in Augusta prepared Marguerite Kirk for the big, bad work of bankruptcy law.

Florida schools set for Saturday showdowns

Opponents stadium feels like home turf

College notes: Hamilton earns respect

Playing for a big payday

Stats aside, Vols wary of No. 4 Gators

Quarterbacks excel on the diamond as well

Winning in Gainesville next major hurdle for Volunteers

Bowden not concerned with revenge

Tech to face smaller school

Running backs grateful for week off

Penn State's offense could be up in the air

O'Leary not happy to just play well

Tech line paves the way for explosive offense

Donnan will likely watch SEC showdown

Georgia Small College Roundup

Postponing games the smart decision

Senate class of '63 a breed apart
ATLANTA -- The Georgia Senate class of 1963 produced captains of industry, public service commissioners, mayors, governors, and even a U.S. president.

Photographer captures Nixon era
WASHINGTON -- In one Watergate image, John Ehrlichman simply glares with every inch of clenched and jutting jaw and out-thrust lower lip.

Supports dress code in area schools

Floyd 'flunks' Hodges

'Goes ape' over Cheek candidacy

Urges action to reduce teen drinking

Why Sprawls won

CSRA to the rescue

Hits coverage of Williams' victory

No bogus tax cut

Insists evolution, Bible incompatible

Blasts idea to 'sell' name of stadium

King of blues returns
Some musical royalty comes calling Thursday at the Augusta-Richmond County Civic Center.

Irish dancing not as simple as it looks
It may look like a bunch of hopping and skipping to some people, but traditional Irish dancing is a little more complex than that.

Bottoms up
The stout will flow and the lads will sing on Riverwalk Augusta this weekend.

Fall flowers
The cooler temperatures of fall are more accommodating for some plants, as well as for the most important element in the garden, the gardener. But while the shorter days mean less time for gardening, they don't mean there is less gardening to do.

Festival showcases area's many cultures
Not quite as impressive as Boston or Savannah's St. Patrick Day festivities, Augusta still holds its own when it comes to shamrock-inspired partying.

Camellias are winter bright spot
Camellias add color to the landscape in winter when few plants are in bloom. If you want to enjoy camellias earlier than normal, you might want to consider "gibbing" them. Gibbing camellias increases the length of time the camellia flowers, and it will also increase the bloom size.

In the know
As a prelude to Saturday's Miss America Pageant, each of the 51 contestants is profiled during Up Close & Personal ... The Search for Miss America 2000.

Ramblin' Rhodes: Children can make noise at Music Factory
Children's attendance at the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in Macon has risen steadily since it opened three years ago, which explains why a major expansion is aimed at educating children.

Godfather inspires the Tower of Power
Without a doubt, James Brown has had an impact on the group Tower of Power. ``He's been an influence for everyone's music,'' said Emilio Castillo, co-founder of the band, which performs at the B.B. King Blues Festival at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Augusta-Richmond County Civic Center. ``All his stuff has so much energy. It's got a clever, crafty, syncopated feeling.''

'Annie' character has fun being mean
The kid with the curly red hair and scruffy mutt is back. A national touring production of Annie will be staged at 8 p.m. Tuesday at Bell Auditorium.

Capsules
A long-term study of more than 9,000 doctors found that those who were overweight at age 25 had a significantly increased risk of developing adult onset diabetes by age 50.

Tournament information

Much-needed rain never came; lake now full of boating hazards

Early clash pits favorites for division

The coach's call

Evacuation postpones football game

Chriswell steps down at Midland Valley

North Augusta faces tough challenge

Big games in Georgia

Players excel in varirous roles

New coach inspires confidence

Top games in S.C.

Kemp carries on legacy

Georgia high school polls

Workplace tension is on the rise
Leadership must be demonstrated, not announced.

King of blues returns

'Annie' character has fun being mean

Bottoms up

Irish dancing not as simple as it looks

Godfather inspires the Tower of Power

Camellias are winter bright spot

In the know

Festival showcases area's many cultures

Ramblin' Rhodes: Children can make noise at Music Factory

Capsules

Board approves plan on air quality

Area briefs: Josey student held on threats charge
A student at Augusta's T.W. Josey High School was jailed on a charge of threatening another student, authorities said Thursday.

Evacuees abandon shelters

'Boheme' delivery heartfelt
As the hurricane threatened outside, the atmosphere at the Imperial Theatre offered the lucky audience a

Airport closings spill over

Suspect in slayings testifies
On trial for his life, Narciso Pineda told jurors Thursday that he had no choice but to shoot two men last Thanksgiving in order to save both his son's and his own life.

Timeline
The following is a day-by-day guide of Hurricane Floyd events.

Harping on the arts
Kelly Stewart plays the harp and answers questions Thursday from pupils at Riverside Elementary School. Miss Stewart will perform at the 19th Annual Arts in the Heart of Augusta Festival.

Evacuees abandon shelters
As soon as Hurricane Floyd left, its refugees left, too.

State's health plan on financial edge

Night spent in shelter peaceful for large family

City puts priority on clearing Floyd debris from roads

Media keeps eye on storm

MCG Health seeks control of S.C. clinics

Board approves plan on air quality
DULUTH, Ga. - A divided Georgia Board of Natural Resources Thursday approved a plan to improve air quality by, among other things, placing stricter controls on industrial emissions and requiring gas stations to sell low-sulfur fuel.

Elderly carried to safety

Storm damage minor
Despite storms and deadly flooding from Hurricane Floyd along the eastern seaboard, Thursday dawned clear in Georgia and South Carolina, where the biggest problem for thousands of refugees was figuring out how and when they could get home.

See You at the Pole draws large crowd

South Georgia spared worst from hurricane

Savannah residents see little destruction

Finance chairman disagrees with deal
First it was lobsters on a leash. Now it's trips to the beach. The company that wined and dined Augusta officials before they voted to award it the largest contract in the city's history now is paying for Mayor Bob Young to travel to Puerto Rico next month.

Donations collected

Storm damage stayed minor in Savannah
SAVANNAH -- Coastal residents returned home Thursday to find their city and the neighboring islands barely touched by the force of Hurricane Floyd.

Charleston sees damage as minor

Hippodrome takes in animal refugees of storm

Mother, her newborn back together at MCG

Area opens to Floyd evacuees

Class schedule changes cause buses to run late

Return traffic crams roads

Daughters describe night of shooting
APPLING -- Through tearful testimony, Rosalva Vazquez recounted how her mother shielded her and her sister from gunfire as their father lay dying only a few feet away.

Daughters describe night of shooting

Refugees tell tales of evacuation

Charleston sees damage as minor
CHARLESTON, S.C. -- Morning broke over Charleston today with a pleasant blush of surprise.

Few residents stay in Savannah to weather storm

Mother, her newborn back together at MCG
Seth Crews Moore was born under a bad storm. Delivered by Caesarean section at 11:57 a.m. Monday at Candler Hospital in Savannah, he developed breathing problems and was whisked away.

Evening school enrollment rising

Harping on the arts

Across the area

Fighting fraud

Heavy rains flood Myrtle Beach
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -- For residents and business people rushing to reopen this entertainment haven along the coast Thursday, removing tree limbs and patching up the torn signs was easy.

Media keeps eye on storm
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -- Channel 15 reporter Karin Mallett planted herself firmly on a wooden deck along Ocean Boulevard on Wednesday.

Elderly carried to safety
HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. -- Barely a tuft of 103-year-old Antonette Tesauro's white hair poked from beneath her blankets as she waited patiently for her roommate to be rolled onto a stretcher and carried to a safer haven.

Babies go back to Savannah
Charlene Perez dropped her off early Tuesday morning and was there Thursday afternoon to pick up McKenzie Hamm and take her back to Savannah.

Storm sparks largest U.S. exodus

Return traffic crams roads
It was deja vu for coastal residents Thursday, except this time they were facing east.

Easy Afternoon
Bonnice Horne spends sometime in the yard swing with her great-great granddaugher Anber Gobbee, 2, Thursday afternoon in North Augusta.

Fighting fraud
GRANITEVILLE, -- The nightmare started with a telephone call at Gail Morgan's workplace. A bank employee was on the line, demanding to collect on an overdue credit card account of nearly $4,000. Soon after, two other banks wanted their money for credit card bills totaling more than $9,000.

Returning
Stephen West of Lawrenceville, Ga., walks along the Tybee Island beach early this morning as residents and tourists were allowed back into the area. Mr. West and his family had evacuated from the area Tuesday.

Returning

Few residents stay in Savannah to weather storm
Savannah -- As daylight faded Wednesday, the city was pounded with heavy rain and strong winds as Hurricane Floyd made its presence known.

Refugees tell tales of evacuation
On Wednesday, Mayor Bob Young made a plea to Augustans to open their homes to some of the 2,800 evacuees who had settled into the city's shelters. We visited with some of the people who were waiting to see what Hurricane Floyd would do next.

State's health plan on financial edge
ATLANTA -- The $980 million health plan for nearly 550,000 state employees and their dependents operated too close to the edge last fiscal year, taking in only about $1 million more in premiums than it paid out in claims, Georgia Community Health Commissioner Russ Toal said Wednesday.

Storm plunges city into darkness
CHARLESTON, S.C. -- Darkness fell early in Charleston on Wednesday afternoon,leaving nothing to do but wait for the worst from Hurricane Floyd.

See You at the Pole draws large crowd
Greenbrier High School students were packed like bees around a hive for Wednesday's See You at the Pole prayer rally.

Residents empty Myrtle Beach

Hippodrome takes in animal refugees of storm
A half-dozen Scottish terriers corralled in a makeshift pen perked up their large ears and barked in unison Wednesday as a rider on horseback passed within a few yards.

Finance chairman disagrees with deal

Area opens to Floyd evacuees
Thousands of Hurricane Floyd evacuees streamed into the Augusta area Wednesday seeking shelter -- in some cases, just a place to park their vehicles -- after completing road trips from Southeastern cities that took three times longer than they ordinarily would.

Storm damage minor

Evening school enrollment rising
Primus Weaver thought he could make it without one when he left Hephzibah High school in 1992. But the military turned him down because he didn't have it, and employer after employer also said he needed it.

Senate class of '63 a breed apart

Evacuation orders, airport closings leave some stranded on coast
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -- Shonna Shinn flew out of Atlanta on Tuesday and landed around 1:45 p.m. at Myrtle Beach International Airport, expecting to enjoy a pleasant vacation.

Timeline

Class schedule changes cause buses to run late
It's been almost four weeks since classes began in Columbia County, and some school buses are still running late. Bus routes have been running behind, mostly because of a change in starting and ending times for elementary and high schools, creating problems for bus drivers trying to run afternoon routes for middle schools.

Storm plunges city into darkness

Storm sparks largest U.S. exodus
The focus on Hurricane Floyd shifted north Wednesday as Georgia dodged the full force of the storm's pounding. Evacuations in the Carolinas mirrored the earlier exodus as thousands fled inland, snarling highway traffic as the hurricane thrashed its way along the coast.

'Boheme' delivery heartfelt

Failure to release reports sparks suit
AIKEN -- A local union organizer is suing Aiken County and Sheriff Howard Sellers for not responding promptly to a Freedom of Information request filed more than a month ago.

Photographer captures Nixon era

Storm damage stayed minor in Savannah

Area briefs: Josey student held on threats charge

Donations collected

Suspect in slayings testifies

Residents empty Myrtle Beach
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -- An abandoned city, normally bustling with tourists, waited quietly late Wednesday for Mother Nature's wrath.

Evacuation orders, airport closings leave some stranded on coast

Thousands of evacuees come to Augusta during storm

City puts priority on clearing Floyd debris from roads
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -- Hurricane Floyd will be remembered for its intense rain and flooding, not for the monster it was made out to be.

Night spent in shelter peaceful for large family
As the evening closed in Wednesday, a steady cooling breeze whispered through the magnolias and ornamental pears sheltering the courtyard at the Alleluia Community School.

Across the area
Cleanup efforts may not be enough ... More qualify for election ... Wackenhut gets security contract

South Georgia spared worst from hurricane
KINGSLAND, Ga. -- Southeast Georgia was spared Wednesday from the catastrophic damage initially predicted from one of the most powerful hurricanes to threaten the state.

Heavy rains flood Myrtle Beach

Savannah residents see little destruction
SAVANNAH -- The predicted roar of Hurricane Floyd was barely a whisper in Savannah on Wednesday.

Easy Afternoon

Weakened Floyd hits land in N.C.
ALONG THE COAST -- Hurricane Floyd washed a shore in Cape Fear, N.C., early today, weakened but still dangerous as it snapped trees and power lines, smashed piers and dumped a foot or more of flooding rain in parts of North Carolina and Virginia.

Failure to release reports sparks suit

Babies go back to Savannah

Airport closings spill over
Hurricane Floyd caused some headaches Wednesday for air travelers in Augusta.

MCG Health seeks control of S.C. clinics
While trying to change the way Medical College of Georgia Hospital and Clinics operate, MCG Health Inc. also is interested in reaching across the Savannah River to three struggling South Carolina hospitals.

Thousands of evacuees come to Augusta during storm
When the next storm of the century strikes the eastern seaboard, Augusta will know what to expect. As Hurricane Floyd approached the Carolina coasts, thousands of evacuees swarmed into Augusta, surpassing all the worst-case scenarios that city officials used to prepare for such events.

Augusta streets packed with refugees
In marked contrast to ghost towns left boarded up and empty along the Southeastern coast, the streets of Augusta were bustling Wednesday with thousands of evacuees waiting out Hurricane Floyd.

Patriots' injuries force personnel changes

I dumped Dorsey: Week 3

Chandler might miss game

Quarterbacks take different paths

Falcons sign players to secure future

Future now for Couch, Browns

Area players in action in college, NFL

By speaking up, Smith sparked comeback

Mr. Frederick Bunch
BEECH ISLAND -- Mr. Frederick C. Bunch, 71, 1365 Williston Road, died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at his residence.

Ms. Evelyn Brundage
AIKEN -- Ms. Evelyn Alice Brundage, 80, of 3 Perth Court, died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999, at Pepper Hill Nursing Center.

Mrs. Virginia Holland
WAYNESBORO, Ga. -- Mrs. Mary Virginia Holland, 65, of 238 Eighth St., died Thursday, Sept. 16, 1999, at Medical College of Georgia Hospital.

Mrs. Sarah Powell
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Mrs. Sarah Ethel May Powell, 92, died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at Washington Regional Medical Center.

Ms. Mary Wynn
WASHINGTON, Ga. -- Mrs. Mary Lois Wynn, 67, of 323 Gordon St., died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at Wills Memorial Hospital.

Mrs. Carolyn Taylor
MILLEN, Ga. -- Mrs. Carolyn Harris Taylor, 73, of 474 Georgia Highway 23 N., died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Holly Price
SALUDA, S.C. -- Mr. Holly B. Price, 77, of Route 6, Ivory Keys Road, died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at Lexington Medical Center.

Mrs. Betty Granade
VERNON, British Columbia -- Mrs. Betty Dike Granade, 69, died Saturday, Sept. 11, 1999.

Mr. Gilbert Owens
HEPHZIBAH -- Mr. Gilbert Owens, 72, of 2423A Patrick Ave., died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Mary Clark
GLENWOOD, Ga. -- Mrs. Mary Kent Clark, 85, died Monday, Sept. 13, 1999, at Lynn Haven Nursing Center, Gray.

Mrs. Nina Waggoner
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- Mrs. Nina Clare Waggoner, 73, died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999.

Mrs. Virginia Reddick
SYLVANIA, Ga. -- Mrs. Virginia Overstreet Reddick, 67, of 505 South Main St., died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Robert Johnson
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Mr. Robert Henry Johnson, 51, of 319 Hillcrest St., died Monday, Sept. 13, 1999, at Washington County Regional Medical Center.

Mr. William O'Quinn
JACKSON -- Mr. William George O'Quinn, 71, of 606 Third St. Extension, died Sunday, Sept. 12, 1999, at his residence.

Mr. Edward Simpson
GRANITEVILLE -- Mr. Edward ``Buddy'' Simpson, of 49 Breezy Hill Drive, died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at his residence.

Mr. Galen Morse
BAXLEY, Ga. -- Mr. Galen D. Morse, 72, died Sunday, Sept. 12, 1999, at his residence.

Mr. Willie Mathis
Mr. Willie Mathis, 63, of 2021 Scott Road, died Sunday, Sept. 12, 1999, at Salem Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.

Mrs. Nancy Johnson
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Mrs. Nancy Beck Johnson, 64, of 661 Hempstead Place, died Monday, Sept. 13, 1999, at Carolinas Medical Center.

Mr. Larry Leonard
Mr. Larry Lamar Leonard, 41, of 1516 Maple St., died Sunday, Sept. 12, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Kathryn Hargett
AIKEN -- Mrs. Kathryn Thomas Hargett, 58, of 229 Lakeside Drive, died Thursday, Sept. 16, 1999, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Parker McLaughlin
O'FALLON, Mo. -- Parker Davis McLaughlin, infant son of Dan and Angie McLaughlin, died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at St. Louis Children's Hospital.

Mr. Willie Perry Sr.
AIKEN -- Mr. Willie Perry Sr., 72, of 1338 Aldrich St. N.E., died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Augusta.

Ms. Daisy O'Tyson
Ms. Daisy J. O'Tyson, 83, of 603 Wellesley Drive, died Thursday, Sept. 16, 1999.

Mrs. Alice Renew
NEWTOWN, Conn. -- Mrs. Alice Blackstone Renew, 75, of 15-C Nunnwak Road, died Monday, Sept. 13, 1999.

Mr. Bennie Asbury
UNION POINT, Ga. -- Mr. Bennie Asbury, 65, of 102 Hunter St., died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at Boswell Memorial Hospital.

Mr. George Still
BARNWELL, S.C. -- Mr. George Marcus Still, 74, died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999.

Mr. Roy L. Johnson Sr.
WASHINGTON, Ga. -- Mr. Roy L. Johnson Sr., 76, of 2647 Sandtown Road, died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Katherine Tapley
NORRISTOWN, Ga. -- Mrs. Katherine Hall Tapley, 73, died Monday, Sept. 13, 1999, at Memorial Medical Center, Savannah.

Mr. Monte Smith
ADRIAN, Ga. -- Mr. Monte C. Smith, 62, died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999, at Fairview Park Hospital, Dublin.

Mrs. Doris Adams
DEARING -- Mrs. Doris Mable Swint Adams, 70, of 2667 Tudor Road, died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mrs. Jessie Eubanks
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mrs. Jessie Alda Shields Eubanks, 90, of 203 East Spring Grove Ave., died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. David Clark
Mr. David M. Clark, of 3067 Quist Drive, died Sunday, Sept. 12, 1999, at McDuffie County Hospital.

Mr. Charles Haynes
SWAINSBORO, Ga. -- Mr. Charles ``Chucky'' Glynn Haynes, 77, of 164 Kathleen Road, died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999, at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta.

Mrs. Eula Johnson
Mrs. Eula K. Johnson, 90, of 822 Forsythe St., died Sunday, Sept. 12, 1999, at University Hospital.

Mr. J.D. Webb Jr.
Mr. J.D. Webb Jr., of 3751 Butterfield Court, Martinez, died Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

Mr. Arnold Bell Sr.
SARDIS, Ga. -- Mr. Arnold M. Bell Sr., 62, of 12932 Highway 23 S., died Thursday, Sept. 16, 1999, at his residence.

Mr. Robert Reid
Mr. Robert Alexander Reid, 57, of 4519 Shawnee Drive, Martinez, died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1999, at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

Mr. Farris Andrews Sr.
SANDERSVILLE, Ga. -- Mr. Farris ``Bell Shaver'' Andrews Sr., 81, of 115 Newman St., died Saturday, Sept. 11, 1999, at Georgia War Veterans Home, Milledgeville.

Mrs. Alice Renew

Mr. William O'Quinn

Mr. Farris Andrews Sr.

Mr. Bennie Asbury

Mr. Robert Johnson

Mr. David Clark

Ms. Evelyn Brundage

Ms. Mary Wynn

Mr. Willie Perry Sr.

Mrs. Virginia Reddick

Mr. Charles Haynes

Mrs. Carolyn Taylor

Mrs. Eula Johnson

Mrs. Doris Adams

Mr. Monte Smith

Mr. Robert Reid

Mr. J.D. Webb Jr.

Mrs. Virginia Holland

Mrs. Katherine Tapley

Mrs. Kathryn Hargett

Mr. Galen Morse

Mr. Frederick Bunch

Mrs. Nancy Johnson

Mrs. Sarah Powell

Mr. Holly Price

Mr. George Still

Mrs. Betty Granade

Mrs. Mary Clark

Sen. Cleland: Resolution lies with the Colombians
THE WAR ON drugs in the United States is not just a war on the streets. As the headlines are telling us, it is a war on the seas, in the air and on the ground, at home and abroad. From drug interdiction to border patrols to street arrests to foreign aid for security efforts, the United States is engaged in a multi-front war where the stakes are high and our children's future is the ultimate prize.

Sen. Coverdell: Crisis requires international attention
TODAY, U.S. foreign policy has been consumed by the crisis in Kosovo, yet another compelling foreign policy challenge is taking place in our own hemisphere. Like Kosovo, this crisis has displaced hundreds of thousands of people -- more than 800,000 since 1995. And instead of a small province being ethically cleansed by its own government, an entire country is fighting multiple wars at once: wars against two competing guerrilla groups; a war against paramilitary organizations; and a war against drug lords who traffic deadly cocaine and heroin into the United States. These are the four wars of Colombia.

Urges action to reduce teen drinking
I was greatly disturbed Sept. 9 when I opened the Neighbors section. In the middle element each week you publish the list of those convicted of driving under the influence each week. Jack Hobbs, Augusta

Sen. Cleland: Resolution lies with the Colombians
THE WAR ON drugs in the United States is not just a war on the streets. As the headlines are telling us, it is a war on the seas, in the air and on the ground, at home and abroad. From drug interdiction to border patrols to street arrests to foreign aid for security efforts, the United States is engaged in a multi-front war where the stakes are high and our children's future is the ultimate prize.

Supports dress code in area schools
This is in response to those parents complaining about the recent dress code of Columbia County middle and high schools. Ella-Mae Burke, Augusta

Wonders what debt area boxer owes
It amazes me how everyone instantly becomes a critic of Vernon Forrest. Let's take a look at whathe has accomplished. While living and training at an Olympic Training Center he won a national championship and represented the United States in the 1992 Olympics. The training camp was not located in Augusta and the coach was not an Augusta coach, but Mr. Forrest still called Augusta his home. After the Olympics Mr. Forrest turned professional, and while he lived and trained in another city he still called Augusta his home. Brian Sloan, North Augusta

Insists evolution, Bible incompatible
In spite of various assertions that the theory of evolution is fact based on scientific evidence, the truth of the matter is that there is no scientific proof to either prove or disprove either evolution or creationism. It's all a question of personal faith. Roger Eden, Grovetown

Sen. Coverdell: Crisis requires international attention
TODAY, U.S. foreign policy has been consumed by the crisis in Kosovo, yet another compelling foreign policy challenge is taking place in our own hemisphere. Like Kosovo, this crisis has displaced hundreds of thousands of people -- more than 800,000 since 1995. And instead of a small province being ethically cleansed by its own government, an entire country is fighting multiple wars at once: wars against two competing guerrilla groups; a war against paramilitary organizations; and a war against drug lords who traffic deadly cocaine and heroin into the United States. These are the four wars of Colombia.

Declares guns provide self-protection
Much has been written about guns. It has been reported that about 1,600 guns have been carried to school campuses. Fewer than 20 (people) have been prosecuted for violating the law. H. Clifton Johnson, Edgefield

Hits coverage of Williams' victory
While I realize this is the 1990s, I am not sure if your paper realizes that it is almost the end of 1999. I have been a subscriber since October 1997. In that time I have felt as if I were reading The Washington Post. Sheila A. Bowens, Fort Gordon

Blasts idea to 'sell' name of stadium
You would think someone could learn from the past. While Clarks Hill Lake was renamed Lake Thurmond, the majority of people still call it Clarks Hill. Molly Lane, Augusta

No bogus tax cut
Can you believe this? The Associated Press reports that after President Clinton vetoes the GOP-led Congress' $792 billion tax cut, Democrats are going to blame Republicans for the lack of tax cuts.

'Goes ape' over Cheek candidacy
This story is a little long, but the point needs to be made. Fred Reed, Augusta

New Clinton stonewall
It's getting to be routine. Any congressional investigation that might embarrass the White House is stonewalled -- and so it is with the Senate's inquiry into why and how President Clinton made his decision to offer clemency to 16 Puerto Rican terrorists, despite the opposition of every law-enforcement agency involved in fighting terrorism.

Why Sprawls won
Congratulations to respected businessman Don Sprawls for prevailing Tuesday against Aiken City Council incumbent Karen Papouchada in a hotly contested GOP primary contest. With no Democratic opposition in November, Sprawls is virtually councilman-elect.

Floyd 'flunks' Hodges
While Vice President Al Gore was congratulating Gov. Jim Hodges in a video conference call Wednesday for his smooth handling of ``the largest peacetime evacuation in the history of the United States,'' hundreds of thousands of South Carolinians, caught up in traffic jams trying to flee Charleston, were cursing Hodges' name.

CSRA to the rescue
Whew, the Southeast, including the coastal areas, didn't get as badly clobbered by Hurricane Floyd as expected. More rain than wind damage, but it's hard to believe that there were parts of the Augusta-Aiken area that got little or no rain.

Back independent in S.C. House race
Scott Singer is an outstanding candidate for the District 81 seat in the South Carolina House ofRepresentatives. We support this excellent candidate because: Joe and Fern Brooks, Aiken

Sponsors loss pulls plug on Rudd

Gibbs' team has enjoyed sucess

Overtime: Running events in coming weeks

Thrashers' future rests on shoulders of Stefan

Callaway cuts Daly loose citing drinking, gambling

Teams play despite the weather

Hurricane postpones Hurricanes-Thrashers game

Overtime: Bulls decide not to re-sign old pro Harper

Arena football team name to be chosen soon

Russia to abandon Mir, focus on international projects
MOSCOW -- The Mir space station will be discarded next year as planned and Russia will switch to contributing to international projects in space exploration, a top space official said Wednesday.

Report: Tougher online stalking laws needed
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Federal and state laws should be strengthened to help curb the growing problem of online stalking, a U.S. Justice Department report recommends.

Radiation-sickened workers may be compensated
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department is proposing a multimillion-dollar compensation package for past and current workers sickened by radiation contamination at a government cleanup site, a department spokeswoman said Wednesday.

Russian aviation service promises Y2K safety
MOSCOW -- Russia's aviation authority said Wednesday it can guarantee the safety of flights over Russian territory and of airport operation during the changeover to year 2000.

FDA approves new breast cancer drug
WASHINGTON -- Breast cancer patients whose tumors have spread to the lymph nodes won a new drug today that promises to improve their chances of survival over one common chemotherapy.

Hackers vandalize Internet sites for stock exchanges
WASHINGTON -- Hackers vandalized the Internet sites Wednesday for Nasdaq and the American Stock Exchange, but there was no evidence they manipulated financial data during the electronic affront to the world's markets.

Children with hepatitis C can recover
Children with hepatitis C may fight off the infection better than adults can, according to a new study.

New protein attacks cancer's blood supply
WASHINGTON -- Researchers have found that a protein that helps regulate blood clotting can be changed into a cancer fighter that starves tumors.

Radiation-sickened workers may be compensated

Report: Tougher online stalking laws needed

Hackers vandalize Internet sites for stock exchanges

Children with hepatitis C can recover

FDA approves new breast cancer drug

New protein attacks cancer's blood supply

Russia to abandon Mir, focus on international projects

Russian aviation service promises Y2K safety