Originally created 09/16/99

In the know



TV TONIGHT:

As a prelude to Saturday's Miss America Pageant, each of the 51 contestants is profiled during Up Close & Personal ... The Search for Miss America 2000. The one-hour show with hosts Nancy O'Dell (Access Hollywood) and Miss America 1999 Nicole Johnson is at 9 p.m. on ABC (WJBF-TV, Channel 6).

A retro episode of The Chimp Channel, an all-simian show, spoofs TV faves I Love Lucy, Bewitched and Charlie's Angels. What's next, The Monkees? Don't bet your bananas against it (10:05, TBS).

Segments on tonight's new edition of Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel include "Baseball and Minorities," a report by Larry Merchant in which Hall of Famer Joe Morgan criticizes major league baseball. Mr. Morgan, now a respected broadcaster, says baseball is not doing enough to increase minority hirings in management or to seek out minority prospects in the United States. Other topics on tonight's show include New York Jets coach Bill Parcells, the Brigham Young University athletic program, and coaches who molest their young players (10 p.m., HBO).

KIDS AND COMPUTERS:

Chiropractors say they're treating more young patients who are suffering from the effects of working at computer stations that are poorly designed for children. Many children are already suffering from repetitive motion injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome and chronic pain in the hands, back, neck or shoulders, says the president of the American Chiropractic Association's Council on Occupational Health. "Parents need to be just as concerned about their children's interaction with their computer workstations as they are with any activities that may affect their children's long-term health," the group says.

TECHNICALLY TEENS:

If you think about all the times you've had to ask your teen-ager to help you on the computer, this will hardly be a surprise: A growing number of teens are leaving retail and fast-food jobs for positions in the high-tech sector, the Challenger, Gray & Christmas business-consulting firm says. In 1998, there were 22,000 computer specialists ages 16 to 19, up from approximately 4,000 in 1994, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

-- From Staff and Wire Reports