Braves notebok

Augusta shut out by Macon

Hank Aaron visits Negro Leagues Museum

Miller, Norton becoming one of SAL's top tandems

Alterations revive Maddux's winning style

Error puts Braves on top

Mets fight back for win over Yanks

Braves notebook

Investors don't need to predict Fed's next move

Fools forego IPO, for now
WASHINGTON -- ``Why buy a stock if it's not a lock? Why pay that price if you're just tossin' dice? Why take such risk? Tsk tsk tsk. These are the rules by which the game is won, Fool.''

Refinancing pays off
Troy and Kristine McGahee spent $3,000 refinancing their Evans home earlier this year. It was money well spent considering they will have saved $122,000 in interest by the time the home is paid off in 2013.

Complain if health plan doesn't cover drugs
Q: My health insurance plan will no longer pay for my prescription drug. What should I do?

Fools forego IPO, for now

Montgomery Ward & Co. redesigning stores
WASHINGTON -- Just a few years ago, Montgomery Ward's idea of fashion included elastic-waisted pants and faux-wood entertainment centers.

Montgomery Ward & Co. redesigning stores

Refinancing pays off

Delta tries to regain image

Delta tries to regain image
ATLANTA -- In other places, folks complain about the weather. In Atlanta, if it's not about traffic, the griping is probably about Delta Air Lines.

Investors don't need to predict Fed's next move
NEW YORK -- Now that the Federal Reserve has tightened credit conditions, mutual-fund investors may worry that they need to hurry up and change their strategies somehow.

Families observe history
WRENS, Ga. -- Descendants of two early families of Georgia and South Carolina gathered recently for their annual reunion to observe their families' history and meet new relatives.

Impeachment tops '90s events
The Augusta Chronicle received hundreds of responses when we asked readers to rank the top world and national news stories of the 20th century.

A look at the 20th Century: 1953
The United States expanded its influence around the world in 1953 as Americans settled in comfortably at home following the Korean War.

A look at the 20th Century: 1952
Dick Clark helped teeny-boppers rock in 1952 with performers he introduced on the first American Bandstand television show. Packard introduced power brakes in automobiles. And 1952 saw the world continue counting Korean War casualties.

This day in history: July 11
1877: A constitutional convention formed in Atlanta to draft a new constitution for the state; former governor Charles J. Jenkins was elected the convention's permanent president.

This day in history: July 12
1887: King Mill declared its first stock dividend at a four percent profit.

Urges city factions to work together

Hits `hypocrisy' of newspaper

Opposes re-zoning for race track

Augusta Ballet coup

Attacks `Boondocks' and Sodomka

Blasts critic of south Richmond

Remove limits on reading

Supports MOX disposal of plutonium

Wants handgun ownership regulated

Voices support for NRA, bearing arms

Grovetown chief busted

When is casual too casual?
So the party invitation says ``casual,'' and your husband emerges from the bathroom in a faded golf shirt, shorts and his best pair of flip-flops. You're not alone.

Tourists adhere to customs
ABHA, Saudi Arabia -- With its vast desert wastelands and myriad oil wells, Saudi Arabia would hardly seem an alluring destination for tourists.

Black artists seek support to get into comic spotlight
CHICAGO -- Black Lightning came and went. ``Pow!'' So did the Falcon and Power Man. ``Blam!'' ``Wham!'' All three were black superheroes created by major white comic book publishers; all have debuted and then all but disappeared since 1969.

In the know
Things are looking up in July. Some enchanted evening this month, you ought to force yourself to put your feet up and stare at the sky. But don't fall asleep just yet. Here are some astronomical July happenings according to Sky and Telescope magazine:

Researchers search for ark's remains
In the summer of 1916, Lt. Vladimir Roskovitsky, a Russian pilot, was flying over mountains in northeastern Turkey when he spotted what appeared to be the weathered remains of a huge ship half-buried on the upper slopes of Mount Ararat.

Common courtesy called for on phone
Dear Carson: I have always felt it is common courtesy for a person making a phone call to identify himself before asking to speak to someone. Am I all wet? -- Disgruntled Phone Answerer

On my summer vacation
VACATIONERS: Johnny and Deborah McDonald of North Augusta and their children, Lauren and Scott McDonald.

Striped bass, hybrid fishing heating up

Jets players arrested in Long Beach

Dog's Bell clear on goals

Heat wins season-opener

Dwight sets camp's fire

Augusta's new game is real hot

NFL Calendar

In the know

When is casual too casual?

On my summer vacation

Tourists adhere to customs

Black artists seek support to get into comic spotlight

Researchers search for ark's remains

Common courtesy called for on phone

Suspect guilty of murder

Steakhouse move goes before city
AIKEN -- On the surface it sounds like no big deal that Ryan's Family Steakhouse wants to move across Whiskey Road to a larger site.

Impeachment tops '90s events

Home front: Woman keeps criminals in line

Allendale report set for today
ALLENDALE, S.C. -- The future of South Carolina's poorest school district could be determined as early as today when a private consulting firm reports on the state of Allendale County's school system.

Across the area

Postcard hunt nears completion

Oliver wary of tax cuts

A real homecoming

Coming this week

Former wrestling star makes her mark on area enthusiasts
Jennifer Hood, 8, of Harlem, made an offer Sunday and former World Wrestling Federation star Rena Mero couldn't say no.

State blood stocks drying up

Agents close poker casinos
AIKEN -- South Carolina State Law Enforcement Division agents had closed down eight illegal video poker casinos by Friday afternoon, but hadn't yet swept the border where Interstate 20 enters Georgia.

Peach Jam begins today

Graham: Spokesman confirms retirement

Families observe history

Renovation of home thrilling for couple

Former wrestling star makes her mark on area enthusiasts

Census seeks exact numbers on blacks

Allendale report set for today

Across the area
Fire officials probe suspicious blazes ... Storms batter Columbia County ... New Converse president begins

A look at the 20th Century: 1953

Governor spends fund on local projects
ATLANTA -- Georgia's governor has millions of dollars in a discretionary fund on hand in case of fire, flood and pestilence.

Bureau sets April 1 as Census Day 2000

Coming this week
The North Augusta-Belvedere branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People will meet at 7 p.m. at American Legion Post 232 in North Augusta. People interested in attending may call 827-9529 for more information.

Proposed Edgefield plan for zoning draws debate

Robbery suspect in custody

This day in history: July 11

Across the area
Aiken man charged in nightclub slaying ... Police search for escapee ... Trucker charged in deadly wreck

Goldberg meets wrestling fans

Across the area

Courts to get death penalty cases, appeals

Artifacts could be continent's oldest

Postcard hunt nears completion
Well, here it is about the midpoint of summer vacation, and our annual postcard contest is doing well. On Memorial Day weekend we began our seasonal effort to get a postcard from all 50 states, and things have gone smoothly.

Ga. cities considered for burials

Bureau sets April 1 as Census Day 2000
Census advertisements will soon tout that April Fool's Day 2000 is the day to be counted. And the count will be an involved process.

Agents close poker casinos

Census seeks exact numbers on blacks
Thousands of Georgia's black residents were not counted in the 1990 census -- an inaccuracy that robbed the state of thousands of federal dollars over the last decade.

This day in history: July 12

Suspect guilty of murder
An Augusta man was found guilty Saturday of shooting his fiancee's brother to death last year.

Governor spends fund on local projects

Renovation of home thrilling for couple
John Barnes says 28 years of his ongoing love affair with his wife, Josephine, flourished in their London Boulevard home.

Steakhouse move goes before city

Domestic violence reports increasing
The number of reported domestic violence cases has more than doubled over the past three years in Columbia County, with case workers attributing the rise to both increased education and a closer relationship between police and victim's support groups.

A real homecoming
Aisha Hickson, 5, dances Sunday in her aunt's new house, which was built with help of Habitat for Humanity. The house, dedicated Sunday in Aiken, is the third home on Representative Drive that Habitat for Humanity has built.

Artifacts could be continent's oldest
ALLENDALE, S.C. -- Albert Goodyear breaks out in a drippy sweat each time he climbs into the rectangular pits lining the banks of the Savannah River.

Thurmond's wife holds 2nd auction
MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. -- Hundreds of books, photos, clothes and knickknacks were carted away as souvenirs from a second auction organized by U.S. Sen. Strom Thurmond's estranged wife.

Goldberg meets wrestling fans
The chant, which has become familiar in arenas across the country, started up well before the man even walked in the building.

Kickboxing KO'd from Games
Jack Nilsson may tie his shoelaces together for the Georgia Games. It might remind him to keep his feet on the ground in the boxing ring.

Robbery suspect in custody
After a two-day search, an Augusta man was behind bars Saturday in connection with an armed robbery that went awry and left a robber fatally wounded last week, police said.

Oliver wary of tax cuts
Augusta Mayor Bob Young and City Administrator Randy Oliver will be on opposite sides when the city's finance committee talks taxes today.

Graham: Spokesman confirms retirement
WASHINGTON -- Considering the early hype surrounding first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton's run for the Senate in 2000 and the upcoming presidential elections, looking toward 2002 seems downright ridiculous.

Home front: Woman keeps criminals in line
Though she stands only 4 feet 11 inches tall, Columbia County's worst criminals listen when Lt. Donna Dunham speaks.

Ga. cities considered for burials
WASHINGTON -- As World War II veterans age, the country is facing a shortage of national burial plots for veterans.

State blood stocks drying up
Blood supplies in Georgia and South Carolina have dropped to dangerously low levels, leaving more than 200 Georgia hospitals with just a half-day's supply, the American Red Cross said Sunday.

Proposed Edgefield plan for zoning draws debate
EDGEFIELD, S.C. -- A zoning plan that would affect about 10 percent of Edgefield County has sparked a controversy between opponents and advocates of zoning that may become more pronounced during a series of public meetings set to begin Monday.

Courts to get death penalty cases, appeals
AIKEN -- Second Circuit Solicitor Barbara Morgan will be juggling a handful of death penalty cases in the coming months, working to put two men on death row while trying to keep two others from leaving it.

Kickboxing KO'd from Games

Mrs. Mary Johnson
LANGLEY -- Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Johnson, 68, of 272 Breeze Hill Road, died Friday, July 9, 1999, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mrs. Elizabeth Ansley
WARRENTON, Ga. -- Mrs. Elizabeth Myrtle Abbott Ansley, 90, of 4888 Ansley Road, died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Emory Cook
Mr. Emory John Cook, 92, of 2321 Redwood Drive, died Friday, July 9, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Ruby Carter
WADLEY, Ga. -- Mrs. Ruby Lucille Carter, 77, of 527 N. Main St., died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at Glendale Nursing Home.

Mrs. Marguerite McRae
KEYSVILLE, Ga. -- Mrs. Marguerite Radford McRae, 80, of 321 Georgia Highway 28, died Friday, July 9, 1999, at St. Joseph Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. James Hawkins
MILLEDGEVILLE, Ga. -- Mr. James Hawkins, 84, died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Emily Rothstein
WINDSOR -- Mrs. Emily Haney Rothstein, 83, of Britton Road, died Friday, July 9, 1999, at her residence.

Mrs. Bessie Stancill
UNION POINT, Ga. -- Mrs. Bessie Carver Stancill, 81, of 3382 Union Point Highway, died Sunday, July 11, 1999, at Minnie G. Boswell Memorial Hospital.

Lemuel Cuthbertson Sr.
WILLISTON, S.C. -- Mr. Lemuel Cuthbertson Sr., 83, of 189 Ryans Road, died Wednesday, July 7, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Rosa Bennett
DUBLIN, Ga. -- Mrs. Rosa Lucille Durden Bennett, 79, of 172 Dewey Warnock Road, died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at Dublinair Health Care Center.

Mr. Jerry Burttram
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mr. Jerry L. Burttram, 62, of 540 Laurel Lake Drive, died Thursday, July 8, 1999.

Mrs. Golda Black
McCORMICK, S.C. -- Mrs. Golda Plyler Black died Sunday, July 11, 1999, at her residence.

Mrs. Ellen Edens
Mrs. Ellen Beatrice Edens, 86, of 4590 Oxford Drive, Evans, died Thursday, July 8, 1999, at Forest Lake Health Care, Martinez.

Mrs. Martha Pressley
Mrs. Martha Hazel Pressley, 79, of Martinez, died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at Columbia Augusta Medical Center.

Mr. Robert Musgrove
AIKEN -- Mr. Robert Ryan Musgrove, 25, of 104-A Mossback Circle, died Friday, July 9, 1999, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mrs. Dorothy Stewart
Mrs. Dorothy L. Stewart, 80, of Martinez, died Sunday, July 11, 1999, at Columbia Augusta Medical Center.

Mrs. Dorothy Seigler
AIKEN -- Mrs. Dorothy Moxley Seigler, 71, of 1416 Wire Road, died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at Aiken Regional Medical Centers.

Mrs. Corine Dixon
WADLEY, Ga. -- Mrs. Corine Gibbons Dixon, 97, of 950 Jordan St., died Wednesday, July 7, 1999, at Jefferson County Hospital, Louisville.

Mrs. Mary Stanley
BLYTHE -- Mrs. Mary Lou McCoy Stanley, 67, of 3654 Hopson Mill Road, died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at St. Joseph Hospital, Augusta.

Mrs. Christine Jones
BLYTHE -- Mrs. Christine Gibson Jones, 62, of 546 Moxleyville Road, died Friday, July 9, 1999.

Angel Wilkinson
WASHINGTON, Ga. -- Angel Land Wilkinson, infant daughter of Howard Wilkinson IV and Jennifer Lannae Land, died Friday, July 9, 1999, at Columbia Augusta Medical Center.

Mr. James Williams Jr.
ELBERTON, Ga. -- Mr. James L. ``Sonny'' Williams Jr., 59, of 2243 Harmony Road, died Friday, July 9, 1999, at Elbert Memorial Hospital.

Rev. Raymond Dean
The Rev. Raymond Stewart Dean, of 3200 Deans Bridge Road, Apartment 2802,died Thursday, July 8, 1999, at University Hospital.

Mrs. Victoria Weaver
PHILADELPHIA -- Mrs. Victoria Harris Weaver, 77, died Wednesday, July 7, 1999, at her residence.

Mrs. Nettie Taylor
SYLVANIA, Ga. -- Mrs. Nettie Mae Pye Taylor, 99, died Sunday, July 11, 1999, at Syl-View Health Care Center.

Mrs. Vivian Neal
GIBSON, Ga. -- Mrs. Vivian Raley Neal, 87, of 434 Beall Springs Road, died Friday, July 9, 1999, at Columbia Augusta Medical Center.

Mr. Jack Edwards
SALUDA, S.C. -- Mr. Jack Edwards, 75, of Chappells Highway, died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at his residence.

Mr. Booker Curry Sr.
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mr. Booker T. Curry Sr., 72, of 703 Ridge Road, died Saturday, July 10, 1999, at his residence.

Mr. James Hawkins

Mrs. Marguerite McRae

Angel Wilkinson

Mrs. Rosa Bennett

Mrs. Corine Dixon

Mrs. Bessie Stancill

Mrs. Mary Johnson

Mrs. Golda Black

Mr. Robert Musgrove

Mrs. Nettie Taylor

Rev. Raymond Dean

Mr. Booker Curry Sr.

Mrs. Ruby Carter

Mrs. Christine Jones

Mrs. Elizabeth Ansley

Mr. James Williams Jr.

Mr. Jack Edwards

Mrs. Victoria Weaver

Mrs. Emily Rothstein

Our schools need more classroom teachers
I AM VERY honored that The Chronicle has given me this opportunity to share with you about my travels and my views as National Teacher of the Year. I am also very appreciative to the employees of Richmond County's school system and all of the wonderful members of the Augusta community who have been so supportive and complimentary to me throughout this incredible adventure.

Remove limits on reading
A story in last Friday's Chronicle headlined ``Limits put on reading programs'' should upset every progressive Georgian who wants all educationally-underserved and at-risk children in the Peach State to read well.

Hits mayor for wife's trip to meeting
Once again The Chronicle has failed in its journalistic obligation to its readers. Mary Agnes Edwards, Augusta

No birth is `wrong'
Parents blessed with healthy children should count themselves lucky. There's nothing in nature -- and there should be nothing in law -- to guarantee every mom she'll have a healthy, normal baby.

Grovetown chief busted
Last Sunday we editorially exposed the fact that Grovetown Police Chief John Tomberlin's department failed to enforce an Augusta Superior Court judge's restraining order against an abusive husband in order to protect a woman. We also commended Columbia County Sheriff Clay Whittle for having one of his deputies step in and enforce the order before any more serious consequences developed.

Supports secession idea for southside
In response to the July 2 letter written by Nicholas Reese, I have been a south Richmond resident since 1988. I have lived in the Augusta area all my life and moved to the ``southside'' from Martinez. I do wish to tell you that the southside did not really want to be consolidated with the city but was railroaded after several years of browbeating by the ``westside'' after promises of better service and more improvements to our districts.Doug Hemingway, Augusta

Our schools need more classroom teachers
I AM VERY honored that The Chronicle has given me this opportunity to share with you about my travels and my views as National Teacher of the Year. I am also very appreciative to the employees of Richmond County's school system and all of the wonderful members of the Augusta community who have been so supportive and complimentary to me throughout this incredible adventure.

Protests Medicare funds for abortion
I have worked with Medicare Part B in a local laboratory for nine years now and have watched as Medicare has slowly added ``Medical Review Policies'' which severely limit the circumstances under which laboratory tests can be paid. For example, in 1990, Medicare made the rule that they would only pay for a routine pap smear once every three years. Charleen Luther, Augusta

Supports MOX disposal of plutonium
On June 24 I attended the public meeting on MOX fuel, held by state Sen. Phil Leventis, D-Columbia. After the main presentation, some who were present concluded that the MOX process was too risky and that the Department of Energy's excess plutonium should be immobilized in glass. I would like to explain why I think the MOX fuel option is the safest of all possible dispositions of weapons grade plutonium. Tim Vincent, Windsor

Blasts critic of south Richmond
Why doesn't Nicholas Reese (letter, July 2) ``secede'' on over into Columbia County since he's such a progressive-thinking voter. Has he forgotten that we voted Larry Sconyers out and voted Bob Young in because we just happen to also be progressive-thinking voters. A. J. Bugg, Augusta

Blasts `thoughtless' critic of southside
The attributes Nicholas Reese (letter, July 2) gave to the southside community of our great city could only be conceived by a ``thoughtless person.'' Whiners are spineless. They have no solutions for themselves or for others. All communities of our fair city have ``doers and whiners.'' Lethia ``Friendly'' Roberts, Augusta

Calls infanticide editorial unreasonable
The June 30 editorial about Marie Noe presented a reasonable opinion until the last paragraph. The reach made by trying to connect the Noe murders with a pro-choice agenda was irresponsible to say the least. The Chronicle has a consistent policy of being anti-choice but the Rick McKee editorial cartoon on July 2 exhibited a new low in common decency and creditability. There are no pro-choice groups having anything but disdain for infanticide. The clearest example of that is their support for international family planning so that poor countries have the option to reduce births rather than resorting to infanticide. Mary Beth Pierucci, Augusta

Hits `hypocrisy' of newspaper
In your July 2 editorial you condemn the Clinton-Gore administration for spending the yet uncollected $1 trillion on Social Security, Medicare, paying the national debt and providing tax cuts. In the same edition, you praise the Republicans by headlining their plan to spend the same uncollected monies on tax cuts, health care, retirement and education. George C. de Baca, Augusta

Opposes re-zoning for race track
Re the July 1 article on rezoning for the Gordon Race Track: Brenda Cooter, Grovetown

Attacks `Boondocks' and Sodomka
The Chronicle's support for ``The Boondocks'' is a study in politically correct hypocrisy. Gene L. Rickaby, Martinez

ASU's history walk
First there was Augusta Riverwalk. Now, thanks to an $875,000 federal grant, there's going to be an Augusta State University History Walk.

Wants handgun ownership regulated
Does Granny carry a LadySmith revolver in her purse along with loose change and mints? Is ``Pack the .38'' the first item on the grocery shopping list? Have loaded handguns replaced fire detectors and air bags as protectors of our personal well-being? Russ Holloman, Ph.D., Evans

Augusta Ballet coup
The Augusta Ballet couldn't have gotten a better person to head up the organization than Louis Hrabovsky. Just how fortunate is our community to get him? Consider this:

Urges city factions to work together
Concerning the July 2 letter from Nicholas Reese, I couldn't agree more about the whiners here on the southside, but they are a small and vocal minority, whom the press is always ready to show as typically south Augustan. Both black and white, we truly don't fit the image the media have cast for us. It's the people across our city with one foot in Columbia County who are a millstone about the necks of our city, not the southside. Andy Cheek, Augusta

Voices support for NRA, bearing arms
... I joined the National Rifle Association because I believe every gun owner should have proper training in the use and safe handling of their weapon. The core of the NRA's philosophy is responsible gun ownership. Terri Exum, Martinez

Urges permanent odd-even water ration
So much time and effort on the water crisis has been spent by citizens and our public servants. Utilities Director Max Hicks is doing as well as possible with the resources at his command. He has to be politically adept at keeping the commissioners and the public happy; and at the same time control a business that is having operational problems. Give the man a chance and the monies required to do the job. He knows what is needed and how to get it done. P. C. Santos, Augusta

Jiffy Lube 300 notebook

World Cup notebook: Akers again inspires teammates

Olympic swimmer shares experiences

Prep notes

U.S. women win 5-4 on penalty kicks

Cloninger's lead dips to one

Overtime: Avery, Moore to be honored today by NAACP

Overtime: Aiken plays Hartsville in Legion playoffs

Augusta State stays on course to hold NCAA tournament

Marina Road for boats, right?

Coach: China still the better team

Putts key for winner

Peach Jam teams paint bulls eyes on Houston, Riverside

Peach Jam begins today

Gordon, crew spark comeback

Burton wins Jiffy Lube 300

Women's team surprised by instant fame

Local buzz: White unable to escape life on the road

Report finds growing online gap between whites, blacks
WASHINGTON -- The disparity between whites and black and Hispanic Americans who own computers and use the Internet is growing significantly toward a ``racial ravine,'' in many cases even after accounting for differences in income, the government reported today.

Heart-healthy diet: fiber, grapes, red wine -- now tea?
NEW YORK -- It used to seem simple: an apple a day to keep the doctor away. Then came warnings against butter, then margarine, then against fat in general, and then for some fats.

Hackers challenge antivirus software makers
LAS VEGAS -- Computer security companies updated their virus-detection software on Sunday after the in-your-face launch at a hackers convention of a new tool designed for stealth invasions of networks operated by Microsoft Windows.

New systems to challenge Game Boy's supremacy
There's nothing more important to the traveling gamer than a good handheld player and a pocket full of fresh batteries. For years, Nintendo's Game Boy was the one to have, despite its tiny screen and shades-of-gray images. When Game Boy Color debuted, sales soared as its 56-color display (from a palette of some 32,000 available shades) and library of more than 400 games snared hordes of fans.

EPA seeks to cut cancer risk from chemicals
WASHINGTON -- The Environmental Protection Agency will broaden its work with state and local governments to monitor hazardous chemicals in the air and develop new plans to reduce toxic air pollution.

Study: More than 280,000 in jail are mentally illness
WASHINGTON -- The nation's prisons and jails held an estimated 283,800 mentally ill inmates in 1998, and they were more likely than other offenders to have committed violent offenses, the Justice Department reported Sunday.

FAA tests air traffic control system
WILMINGTON, Ohio -- The future of air traffic control got a flight test Saturday as more than a dozen planes with satellite-positioning systems flew over Ohio and Kentucky while monitors tracked the exact location of each aircraft.

Astronaut reclusive 30 years after moon walk
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Neil Armstrong was standing at the pad where he blasted off on July 16, 1969, watching the tower roll away from the soon-to-be-launched space shuttle Columbia, when a technician approached him.

FDA issues nationwide warning about contaminated juice
TEMPE, Ariz. -- Reacting to dozens of salmonella cases nationwide, the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday warned consumers not to drink unpasteurized orange juice distributed by an Arizona company.

Report finds growing online gap between whites, blacks

Hackers challenge antivirus software makers

Heart-healthy diet: fiber, grapes, red wine -- now tea?

FAA tests air traffic control system

Study: More than 280,000 in jail are mentally illness

FDA issues nationwide warning about contaminated juice

New systems to challenge Game Boy's supremacy

Astronaut reclusive 30 years after moon walk

EPA seeks to cut cancer risk from chemicals