Investors drawn to auctions
Paula Guilbeau closed her eyes as the volley of bidding took place, the price climbing higher and higher. Stop, please stop, she thought. When the auctioneer had the last word, she and her husband Mark had purchased the land they wanted -- 2.8 acres beside their house on Mullikin Road -- for $24,500.

Briefcase
Entrepreneur magazine reports that David Filo and Jerry Yang, founders of the Internet company Yahoo!, have a net worth of $3 billion each today. If both men had not dropped out of Stanford University's Ph.D. program, they might have gone on to earn a starting salary of $57,000 to $110,000 a year, Entrepreneur says.

Local briefs
Procter & Gamble Co. announced June 9 that it plans to eliminate 15,000 jobs worldwide -- about 13 percent of its work force -- during the next six years. It also plans to close about 10 plants, but officials are not saying which ones.

Restoring Regency
Every week, Dolly Kent drives her Buick more than 50 miles from her home in Gibson to Regency Mall. She goes to the shopping center to get her hair fixed and buy new outfits. She's been shopping there for more than two decades.

Raise takes more than just work
Many employees feel that they are overworked, or underpaid or both. Doing less work may ease the feeling but result in being fired, while seeking a raise may produce a pleasant surprise. The most common error in pursuing a pay increase is not accurately distinguishing between wanting a pay increase and deserving one.

Employees' demands rising
Hiring and keeping the top candidates for job vacancies isn't just about money anymore, particularly in the most rapidly expanding employment fields, experts say.

Chattanooga mall recovered from brink of extinction
Until recently, Eastgate Mall -- like Regency Mall -- was dying. After more than three decades, the Chattanooga, Tenn., shopping center was nearly empty. Suburban development had moved to other areas, and a newer, larger mall had replaced it as the place to shop.

Summer jobs and lessons learned
It's understandable that some young people complain about summer jobs -- those seasonal tasks they take on to earn a little extra money. I know. I had several.

Repetitive-strain guide a must-read
Over the past few decades, putting out a newspaper has become increasingly computer-intensive. So have plenty of other industries; in fact, a new breed of company existing entirely in the datastream emerged in this decade.

IRA geared for self-employed
Becoming self-employed means saying goodbye to the things you hate about corporate America: oppressive managers, back-stabbing co-workers and pesky human resources personnel.

Security, health keys to prosperity
Consider this. Today, a newspaper reporter called me to ask for comment on a U.S. government study that suggests that more than 40 percent of the people of pre-consolidation Augusta live in poverty (that is, basically, 40 percent of the people living in the ``old,'' downtown Augusta area).

Money is the root of all business
There is only one real measurement of success for business. Money. The more a company makes, relative to cost, the better value a company appears to investors, competitors and the marketplace.

Superwoman taking off her cape
Remember the myth of Superwoman, a descriptive title that became widespread in the early 1970s for a woman who did it all?

Women enjoy links to business
For years, Alice Flannigan wanted to play golf. But it was a ``male sport.'' About two years ago, Dr. Flannigan decided to give golf a try. She joined the Executive Women's Golf Association, a national organization with a chapter in Augusta.

Board makeup key to success
A company's board of directors, can tell you a lot about the firm, experts say. But selecting one and keeping it current can be tough, especially in a dynamic marketplace.

School invites firms to area
As a young boy, Terry Elam watched workers build the Continental Can plant from the porch of his great uncle's south Richmond County home.

Elam: Drawing jobs challenging
Q: As a member of various economic development organizations in the area, what do you think is the biggest challenge in bringing new jobs to the community?

Braves notebook

Braves notes: Maddux has been both lucky, good during recent hot stretch

Padres rock Rockies

Jackets win in extra innings

Baseball roundup: Rockies end Padres' win streak

Jackets Trivia

Braves let a lead slip

Braves blank Mets, again

Mets place Bonilla on DL

Braves blank Mets, again

Jackets bomb Crocs

GreenJackets notes: Mowel's tattoo could be good-luck charm

Braves notebook

Board makeup key to success

Women enjoy links to business

Restoring Regency

Chattanooga mall recovered from brink of extinction

Elam: Drawing jobs challenging

Ethnicity pays off for banks

Security, health keys to prosperity

On the move
Rachel Meehan, has been named director of finance and administration for the Augusta Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Repetitive-strain guide a must-read

Complacency threatens every investor, even in bull market
NEW YORK -- In the midst of a mighty bull market, one of the biggest challenges facing any mutual-fund investor is to resist complacency.

Superwoman taking off her cape

Ethnicity pays off for banks
ATLANTA -- A sudden spurt of Georgia banks chartered by immigrants to the United States and targeted toward ethnic customers is showing the American dream of riches and security includes newcomers.

Summer jobs and lessons learned

Music stores in tune with Web

Rio's new music machine is receiving mixed reviews

Local briefs

Briefcase

Additional business news: Radisson, Sizemore honored; television stations win awards
The Radisson Riverfront Hotel Augusta has been named the winner of the President's Award and named as one of the best hotels in Radisson Hotels International's global system.

Money is the root of all business

Music stores in tune with Web
The owner of two music stores, Robert ``Flash'' Gordon isn't afraid of new technology -- even if it could end up hurting his own business.

IRA geared for self-employed

Know risks in co-signing loan
Q. My teen-age son is planning to buy his first car. Should I co-sign his auto loan?

Investors drawn to auctions

Complacency threatens every investor, even in bull market

Employees' demands rising

On the move

Raise takes more than just work

School invites firms to area

Rio's new music machine is receiving mixed reviews
The Diamond Multimedia Rio, a pager-size music player that doesn't need a cassette or compact disc to operate, has been met with mixed reviews -- especially by record shop owners.

This day in history: July 4
1976: Augusta's Bicentennial Park on the 600 and 700 blocks of Broad Street, the first phase of a $4 million beautification project, was dedicated during a daylong downtown Independence Day celebration.

A look at the 20th Century: 1951
As 1951 began, Americans who had not forgotten the recent nightmare of World War II were embroiled in another conflict in Asia -- this time in Korea.

Clarifies arena's seating capacity

Honor America

No Grovetown sanctuary

A 'CATS-cut' bonanza?

Municipal Bldg. danger

Hits ABC for honoring 'Hanoi Jane'

Likes kid section, diverse letters

Claims racist response to violence

Hopes newspaper keeps 'Boondocks'

Suggests two tax-reducing ideas

Defends congressman over VA funds

Test of citizenship
Nearly half a million immigrants became U.S. citizens last year. To do so, they had to pass a citizenship test that may leave many American-born citizens puzzled.

In the know
TV FIREWORKS: If you can't get out to see fireworks Sunday, television offers some: At 7:30, cable's A&E Network begins the Boston Symphony Orchestra's three-hour extravaganza-with-fireworks.

Sightings of creature still being reported
For centuries, the mountain people of Nepal and Tibet have feared the yeti, a man-beast they say inhabits the snow-fields of the Himalayas.

Cruise includes variety of activities
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. -- It's excitement at 5 mph, an adventure that falls somewhere between rafting with Huck Finn and cruising on The Love Boat.

Answers to the citizenship test
Here are answers to the 50 questions on U.S. history and government.

Arts council seeks original literary works
CALLING ALL SCRIBES -- The Greater Augusta Arts Council is seeking entries for the Sixth Annual Porter Fleming Writing Competition, which offers $5,600 in prizes in four categories.

On my summer vacation ...
After two weeks in London, Marty and Doris Charnock of Augusta took the Queen Elizabeth 2 home to New York.

Flag rules ensure respect
Dear Readers: Each year I try to write something about flag etiquette to honor this holiday. The following rules are good in regard to displaying the U.S. flag:

Ancient treasures
CAIRO -- When the novelist Virginia Woolf sought truth about some of the problems that plague humanity, she went to London's British Museum. So do millions every year, though generally for less elevated reasons. They stream into the sprawling neo-Greek temple to see the Magna Carta, the Elgin Marbles and, above all, the mummies.

Test of citizenship

In the know

On my summer vacation ...

Ancient treasures

Cruise includes variety of activities

Arts council seeks original literary works

Flag rules ensure respect

Sightings of creature still being reported

Answers to the citizenship test

Veterans recall the meaning of independence

Flags presented to veterans, families

College tuition rising

Legionnaires burn old, retired flags during ceremony
They were more rags than flags, the Old Glories that some local veterans ignited Sunday.

Officers patrol holiday boaters

Across the area
Alcohol-related crash kills man ... Man charged in briefcase theft ... Peeping Tom suspect arrested ...

Holiday unites family, Butler High student says

Sheriff soliciting ideas
AIKEN -- Taking a chapter from the Old West when sheriffs rounded up a posse to capture outlaws, Sheriff Howard Sellers is gathering up his own platoon to answer an increasing workload.

Family drops technology for holiday

College tuition rising
COLUMBIA -- Tuition at South Carolina's colleges is on the rise to make up for the loss of state-appropriated funds.

This day in history: July 4

Mayor's aide takes care of business

Hotels see bookings as Georgia Games nears
The numbers are racking up: 200 hotel rooms, 500 visitors booked, 1,500 volunteers. But some of the most crucial numbers are decreasing fast -- only 16 days to the Georgia Games.

Indicted lawmaker re-elected

Bad deals leave area man with list of lawsuits

Across the area

Fourth of July strikes chord of patriotism for area musician

Court: Marijuana law unconstitutional

Traffic deaths worry Aiken County

Holiday festivities beat heat

A look at the 20th Century: 1951

Traffic deaths worry Aiken County
AIKEN -- With the Interstate 20 accident last weekend that claimed five lives, Aiken County surpassed the 1997 death toll on its roads even before the year was half over.

Across the area

Residents donate at festival to help buy area wetland
AIKEN -- When someone asked who would donate $20 to smear a banana cream pie in the face of Aiken City Councilman Skipper Perry on Saturday, a rambunctious 9-year-old answered the call.

Holiday's importance reflected in residents

Across the area
Convicted killer soon to get parole ... Horse dumps six from carriage ... Fire destroys Barnwell pawnshop

Residents donate at festival to help buy area wetland

Pride in America cherished

Water main has often cost city dearly

Mayor's aide takes care of business
Mark Gibbons is the details guy, not the man who would be king. In fact, he's not interested in a political career at all. He applied for the job as administrative assistant to Augusta's mayor because he thought it sounded interesting, and it gave him a chance to solve problems.

Visiting an old pal for Fourth

Indicted lawmaker re-elected
ATLANTA -- Suspended Savannah Sen. Diana Harvey Johnson this week becomes the fourth black state lawmaker -- and the highest-ranking one -- to face trial on criminal charges related to legislative service during the 1990s.

Holiday unites family, Butler High student says
When Celeste Robinson thinks about the Fourth of July, she thinks of -- what else? -- fireworks.

Holiday festivities beat heat
Locals threw Uncle Sam one heck of a birthday party Sunday. Area residents crowded into street festivals, theaters and fireworks shows to celebrate Independence Day.

Officers patrol holiday boaters
LEXINGTON, S.C. -- The boating manual that Officer Dudley Britt must try to commit to memory is a little more than two inches thick.

Court: Marijuana law unconstitutional
Treating people equally under the law has led the state's Supreme Court to condemn Georgia's DUI law as it pertained to marijuana.

Water main has often cost city dearly
If it proves to be leak-proof, the county's decrepit 42-inch water main may be back on-line this week, but it wasn't revived -- for the fifth time -- before sucking over $1 million from the county's coffers.

Water demand doubled since 1993
GRANITEVILLE -- Breezy Hill is booming. New subdivisions, especially in the Ascauga Lake area and industrial growth linked to Sage Mill, have made the Graniteville community a hot spot in the last decade.

Visiting an old pal for Fourth
Ted Martin grew up in Boston, knew the Kennedys, went to Harvard, fought in World War II, has lived past 80 and worked for newspapers in Savannah, Minneapolis and Atlanta.

Senator pushing for Army museum
COLUMBIA -- Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C., has introduced a bill to create a national museum for the U.S. Army, the only branch of the military that doesn't already have a national museum or plans for one.

Bad deals leave area man with list of lawsuits
From his white brick home in a gated golf community, Larry Katzer lived the good life. He amassed a large collection of sports memorabilia. He hobnobbed with the rich and famous. And when it all went bad, he disappeared, leaving a trail of lawsuits, bankrupt businesses and bad debts.

Hotels see bookings as Georgia Games nears

Family drops technology for holiday
At the Miller house, we're going to celebrate Independence Day the old-fashioned way -- with watermelon, fireworks and a family cookout. Sounds lovely, doesn't it?

Water demand doubled since 1993

Holiday's importance reflected in residents
It's more than a birthday; it's a blueprint. The July Fourth holiday -- Independence Day -- is a type of cultural DNA, holding the seeds of national identity for the United States, shaping ideals and values nurtured during more than two centuries.

Sheriff soliciting ideas

Fourth of July strikes chord of patriotism for area musician
Wayne Hoey will be playing his heart out again to celebrate the July Fourth holiday tonight.

Legionnaires burn old, retired flags during ceremony

Veterans recall the meaning of independence
As a boy growing up in Chicago in the 1950s, Gil Guerrero has fond memories of his family's annual Fourth of July celebrations.

Pride in America cherished
Dr. Henry Baffoe-Bonnie voted for the first time in the United States in 1996, one year after he became an American citizen.

Flags presented to veterans, families
Paying homage to valiant American soldiers on one city block and competing in a cutthroat barbecue grill-off on another, Augustans on Saturday covered all bases in their pre-Fourth of July celebrations downtown.

Park dedicated to local players

Jessica Laster
HAMPTON, S.C. -- Jessica Michelle Laster, 13, of 1601 Jackson St. W., died Friday, July 2, 1999, at her residence.

Mrs. Beauford Woodward
AIKEN -- Mrs. Beauford Partridge Woodward, 90, of 3421 Trolley Line Road, died Friday, July 2, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Josey Smith
BARTOW, Ga. -- Mr. Josey W. Smith, 74, of 8466 Heards Bridge Road, died Saturday, July 3, 1999, at Washington County Regional Medical Center.

Mr. James Parker
Mr. James Edward Parker, 77, of 2402 Wheeless Road, died Thursday, July 1, 1999, at Columbia Augusta Medical Center.

Mrs. Daisy Cates
WAYNESBORO, Ga. -- Mrs. Daisy Crane Cates, 85, died Sunday, July 4, 1999, at Burke County Hospital.

Mr. Charles Liles
GREENVILLE, S.C. -- Mr. Charles Johnson Liles, 78, of 905 Wenwood Circle, died Friday, July 2, 1999.

Mrs. Mary Dunbar
BARNWELL, S.C. -- Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Mathis Dunbar, 91, of 11629 Dunbar St., died Tuesday, June 29, 1999, at Silver Springs Healthcare, Williston.

Mrs. Kathryn Young
THOMSON -- Mrs. Kathryn Young, 86, of 690 Chestnut Drive, died Saturday, July 3, 1999, at McDuffie County Hospital.

Miss Ella Clark
Miss Ella Elizabeth Clark, 75, of 2541 Milledgeville Road, recently died at Blair House Nursing Center.

Mr. Harry Riley
BARNWELL, S.C. -- Mr. Harry Carter Riley, 77, died Saturday, July 3, 1999, in Aiken.

Mr. David Jennings
LANGLEY -- Mr. David Edward Jennings, 63, of 2671 Augusta Road, died Saturday, July 3, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Edwina Bennett
Mrs. Edwina Cowan Bennett died Saturday, July 3, 1999, at Columbia Augusta Medical Center.

Mr. Shellie Gibson
Mr. Shellie Norman Gibson, of 1730 Sibley Road, died Saturday, July 3, 1999, at Windermere Health and Rehabilitation Center.

Mrs. Janie Mize
UNION POINT, Ga. -- Mrs. Janie Lou Channell Mize, 79, of 214 Binns St., died Friday, July 2, 1999, at Macon Medical Center.

Mr. Robert Mullinnix
Mr. Robert Leon Mullinnix, 55, of 151 W. Lynn Drive, Martinez, died Friday, July 2, 1999, at University Hospital.

Spc. Michael Roberts
GERMANY -- Spc. Michael Lee Roberts, 25, died Friday, June 25, 1999, in Denmark.

Mrs. Mary Cooper
Mrs. Mary Jane Womack Cooper, 95, died Saturday, July 3, 1999, at Magnolia Nursing Home.

Mrs. Reba Rice
GIBSON, Ga. -- Mrs. Reba Williamson Rice, 80, of 434 Beall Springs Road, died Friday, July 2, 1999, at Gibson Health and Rehabilitation Center.

Mrs. Susan Clifton
DEARING -- Mrs. Susan Lenora Clifton, 93, of 7141 U.S. Highway 221, died Friday, July 2, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Harold Stein
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mr. Harold ``Hal'' Arthur Stein, 45, died Friday, July 2, 1999, in Edgefield County.

Mrs. Geneva Kitchens
Mrs. Geneva Riley Kitchens, 90, of 1989 Fenwick St., died Friday, July 2, 1999, at her residence.

Mrs. Frankie Scott
Mrs. Frankie Burgess Scott, 75, of 3151 Lake Forest Drive, Apartment 73, died Sunday, July 4, 1999, at St. Joseph Hospital.

Mrs. Mildred Schwartz
Mrs. Mildred F. Schwartz, 85, died Friday, July 2, 1999.

Mrs. Lucille Quattlebaum
GREENWOOD, S.C. -- Mrs. Lucille Abney Quattlebaum, 68, of 116 Weiner Circle, died Wednesday, June 30, 1999.

Mr. Thomas Mossor
GREENSBORO, Ga. -- Mr. Thomas Alvin Mossor, 73, of 1740 Arrowhead Road, died Friday, July 2, 1999, at his residence.

Mrs. Annie Coursey
BATH -- Mrs. Annie Kneece Coursey, 77, of 10 Wall St., died Sunday, July 4, 1999, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mr. Lenvel Trent
Mr. Lenvel ``Len'' Trent, 56, of 935 Horseshoe Road, died Friday, July 2, 1999, at his residence.

Mr. William Ahmuty Jr.
SAVANNAH -- Mr. William ``Bill'' Clemence Ahmuty Jr., 79, died Sunday, July 4, 1999, at Candler Hospital.

Mrs. Fannie Dugar
NORTH AUGUSTA -- Mrs. Fannie Mae Dugar, 66, of 64 Moragne St., died Wednesday, June 30, 1999, at University Hospital, Augusta.

Mrs. Ruth Towner
Mrs. Ruth Marian Towner, of 1606 Woodhill Trail, died Friday, July 2, 1999, at Windermere Health and Rehabilitation Center.

Mrs. Frances Jackson
LINCOLNTON, Ga. -- Mrs. Frances Elizabeth Jackson, 87, of 1160 Cedar Road, died Sunday, July 4, 1999, at her residence.

Mr. Thomas Mossor

Mrs. Kathryn Young

Mrs. Lucille Quattlebaum

Mrs. Reba Rice

Spc. Michael Roberts

Mrs. Mildred Schwartz

Mr. James Parker

Mrs. Frances Jackson

Mrs. Daisy Cates

Mr. William Ahmuty Jr.

Mrs. Mary Dunbar

Mr. Josey Smith

Mrs. Beauford Woodward

Mrs. Geneva Kitchens

Jessica Laster

Mrs. Janie Mize

Mrs. Frankie Scott

Mr. Lenvel Trent

Mrs. Edwina Bennett

Miss Ella Clark

Mrs. Annie Coursey

Mr. Shellie Gibson

Mrs. Ruth Towner

Mrs. Mary Cooper

Mr. Harold Stein

Column: Price controls are wrong way to help seniors get the medicines they need
A SIGN over the counter of a print shop offers some good guidance on strengthening and improving Medicare to cover prescription drugs: ``Price, Speed, Quality -- Pick Two.'' In other words, we need to set priorities about what we want in a Medicare drug benefit and to ask hard questions about whether the various proposals meet those goals.

Column: Food bank needs public, private partners
The first was the annual National Association of Letter Carriers Food Drive on May 8, the largest one-day food drive in the United States. Over 115,000 pounds of food were delivered to Golden Harvest Food Bank. No other food bank in Georgia received more food that day!

Lists 'secret' groups dangerous to U.S.
Re K. Lummis' June 27 letter pertaining to Freemasons: Carl W. Rafoth, Augusta

Suggests two tax-reducing ideas
Our government must always look for ways and opportunities to cut taxes. Let me suggest two: David B. Bell, Augusta

Hopes newspaper keeps 'Boondocks'
I hope The Chronicle continues to run the comic ``Boondocks.'' Believe it or not, there are some people who can actually relate to it. For those who don't like it, why don't you simply ignore it? In life there are many things to dislike, but you can't change all of it. Samantha Cobb, Hephzibah

Likes kid section, diverse letters
We moved to Augusta (recently) and subscribed to your paper right away. Thank you for the variety you include every day. Beatrice Rehbein, Augusta

Claims racist response to violence
Although juvenile crime is down in America, the media reports give a different impression. The highly publicized school shootings in a period of 18 months include: Springfield, Ore.; Fayetteville, Tenn.; Edinboro, Penn.; Jonesboro, Ark; Paducah, Ky.; Pearl, Miss., and Littleton, Colo. In these incidents Americans have been shown another face of youth violence, white suburban males. Barbara Thurmond, Augusta

Honor America
The U.S. Senate recently joined the U.S. House in conducting the Pledge of Allegiance to the American flag before the start of business. Unfortunately, this coincides with a record number of young students in all too many schools (often egged on by the so-called American Civil Liberties Union) who are refusing to stand for the Pledge.

Raps those who place blame on others
I read another article in last Sunday's paper concerning penalties for gun manufacturers, alcohol sales, cigarette companies and heaven knows what's next. John Yarzebinski, Aiken

A 'CATS-cut' bonanza?
If an extra $1 trillion in surplus revenues will be flowing into federal coffers over the next 15 years, as White House economic forecasters predict, then doesn't that cinch the case for big tax cuts?

Column: Food bank needs public, private partners
The first was the annual National Association of Letter Carriers Food Drive on May 8, the largest one-day food drive in the United States. Over 115,000 pounds of food were delivered to Golden Harvest Food Bank. No other food bank in Georgia received more food that day!

Supports requiring school uniforms
I'd like to direct attention to those who resent having to buy school uniforms for their children and to the children who use their parents to oppose it. Miguel A. Lopez, Augusta

Hits ABC for honoring 'Hanoi Jane'
ABC has included Jane Fonda in a list of ``100 years of Great Women.'' Veterans should complain to their local ABC affiliates about this disgraceful insult to the men who fought and died in Vietnam. Roger P. Nelms, USMC (Ret), Aiken

Column: Price controls are wrong way to help seniors get the medicines they need
A SIGN over the counter of a print shop offers some good guidance on strengthening and improving Medicare to cover prescription drugs: ``Price, Speed, Quality -- Pick Two.'' In other words, we need to set priorities about what we want in a Medicare drug benefit and to ask hard questions about whether the various proposals meet those goals.

Defends congressman over VA funds
Chuck Pardue (letter, June 29), suing lawyer and former chairman of the Richmond County Democratic Party, calls for Rep.Charlie Norwood, R-Ga., to resign Congress, because President Bill Clinton's budget is short of money for our veterans. Therefore, the Clinton-appointed VA Secretary Togo West may allow layoffs at the Augusta VA. George Paschall, Appling

Urges spending to fix water woes now
As the water production superintendent of the Augusta Utilities Department, I have been reading and listening with great concern to all of the possible solutions for our current water problems. We have had solutions that suggested privatization, revamping the Utilities Department, creating anauthority and some that have not even been mentioned. Brantley Kuglar, Augusta

Municipal Bldg. danger
The unguarded Augusta-Richmond County Municipal Building, housing judges' chambers, courtrooms, the mayor's office, city Commission chambers and key government offices, could well be the site of a potential tragedy.

Clarifies arena's seating capacity
Re the June 28 article about the Civic Center's attendance: Richard McKinley, Augusta

The wrong therapy
A bill passed by South Carolina's General Assembly will make life a lot tougher for registered sex offenders who live near day-care centers or schools. It requires sheriffs to notify residents of the perverts they have living in their neighborhoods.

No Grovetown sanctuary
Grovetown Police Chief John Tomberlin had to be taught two lessons the other day: 1) A judge's arrest warrant will be served and 2) Clay Whittle is sheriff of all of Columbia County, including Grovetown.

India team wins Wimbledon doubles

Golf notes: Woods stays hot at sweltering Western Open

Local buzz: Former Jaguar golfer Park making early impression

Tour de France remains shadowed by drugs

Davenport and Graf reach Wimbledon final

Overtime: Augusta crew wins in England

Golf roundup

Davenport takes women's crown

College notes: Despite Kansas St. pleas, BCS likes regional games

Kickoff for Heat less than week away

U.S. roots for women's soccer team

Jarrett's win solidifies Winston Cup lead

Runners from Morocco, South Africa capture titles at Peachtree Road Race

U.S. players sweep Wimbledon

Gamble pays off for Jarrett

Agassi, Sampras meet again at Wimbledon

Grant prepares for 1999 season

Overtime: Augusta crews enjoy another successful day

U.S. women advance to championship

Sweltering heat challenges athletes, volunteers

Petty's 'back to normal'

National Zoo proposes 10-year panda lease
WASHINGTON -- Officials at the National Zoo have made a 10-year, $2.5 million offer to lease a pair of giant pandas from China.

Ocean cover could kill hurricanes
MIAMI -- In an attempt to give man an advantage over nature, scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology are experimenting with ways to thwart the power of a hurricane before it hits land.

Police use e-mail to nab suspect on weapons charges
WAKEFIELD, Mass. -- A man who was declared unfit to stand trial on weapons charges was charged again after his mental capabilities appeared fine in a 10-month Internet romance with an undercover agent.

Dioxin fear spreads in Japan
TOKOROZAWA, Japan -- Eiko Kotani keeps her windows closed and runs an air purifier all day long. She washes her vegetables carefully, peels her tomatoes and avoids fatty meat, fish from the nearby bay and ice cream of any flavor.

'Star Ocean' a decent role-game
Role-playing games are just not my cup of tea. There, I said it. I feel so much better. However, I have been known to enjoy a really good one -- the Zelda series is a fine example, Parasite Eve is another -- and so I came to Sony's latest offering, Star Ocean: The Second Story, with an open mind.

Versatile mineral
WASHINGTON -- You bypass the grocery dairy aisle, shun broccoli and greens, skip the calcium-fortified orange juice. Wonder if your bones are weak?

Racial minority donors of eggs or sperm are scarce
WASHINGTON -- Married 14 years and yearning to have their own baby, Cathy and David, a young black couple from suburban Philadelphia, thought their prayers were answered when a black woman agreed in 1996 to donate her eggs so they could conceive.

Versatile mineral

Dioxin fear spreads in Japan

Racial minority donors of eggs or sperm are scarce

National Zoo proposes 10-year panda lease

Ocean cover could kill hurricanes

'Star Ocean' a decent role-game