Originally created 06/28/99

Overtime: Palmetto club sending 26 to region meet



Twenty-six of 28 members of the Palmetto Track and Field Club of Aiken have qualified for USA Track and Field's Junior Olympics Regionals in Baltimore July 7-11.

They competed at the state level on Saturday in Columbia.

The club, less than a year old, consists of girls and boys ranging in age from 9 through 18. Those who finish in the top three in the regionals qualify for the nationals in Omaha, Neb., during the last week of July.

Head coach Ken Cole said many club members will compete in the Georgia State Games in mid-July. Cole said credit for the club's success is due to volunteers including assistant coach Russ Busbee, throws coach Brian Stewart, specialty coach Jack Gilmore, hurdles/sprint coach Mel Hawkins, stretch coach Lisa Glover, and Ginny Busbee and Debbie Clark who help with the younger kids.

Jeff Hartwig smashed his American record in the pole vault, soaring 19 feet, 9 inches, at the USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships Sunday.

In clearing on his first attempt, Hartwig surpassed the mark of 19-8 1/2 he set last year.

GOLF:

Clemson University golfer Jonathan Byrd won the Northeast Amateur Golf Championship on Sunday, shooting a final round, even par 69 on the Wannamoisett Country Club course.

He finished at 2-under-par 274, seven strokes ahead of runner-up Arron Baddeley of Victoria, Australia, and eight ahead of Georgia Tech's Bryce Molder.

Augusta's Charles Howell (Oklahoma State) finished in a three-way tie for sixth with a closing 1-over-par 70. Other Augusta finishers were John Engler (Clemson), 20th; Scott Volpitto (TCU), 32nd, and Jeff Knox, 78th.

Augusta's Vaughn Taylor carded a 4-under-par 68 Sunday to finish in a two-way tie for ninth with Joey Maxon of Greenville, S.C., in the Hooters Casino Strip Resorts Classic in Robinsonville, Miss. Each won $2,050.

Winner was Jason Caron of South Yarmouth, Mass., who won a five-man playoff and $15,000.

OUTBOARD RACING:

Greg Foster of Orange, Calif., battled the rough waters of the Saginaw River in the Bay City (Mich.) River Road Sunday to post his first Professional Racing Outboard Performance Formula One Powerboat Tour victory.

Defending champion Tim Seebold of Fenton, Mo., was second, Jason Campbell of Chandler, Ariz., third and Augusta's Rusty Campbell finished fourth for the third straight race.

Next race is in Saskatoon, Sask., Canada on July 24-25, followed by St. Louis Aug. 7-8 and River Race Augusta on Aug. 21-22.

FOOTBALL:

Pat Barnes and Andy McCullough burned the Barcelona Dragons secondary for three touchdowns Sunday as the Frankfurt Galaxy won the World Bowl 38-24 in Dusseldorf, Germany.

Barnes, from the Oakland Raiders, hit McCullough for scoring passes of 13, 37 and seven yards as the Galaxy won NFL Europe's championship game for the second time.

Angelo Bertelli, who won the Heisman Trophy in 1943 while at Notre Dame, died Saturday at his Clifton, N.J., home of brain cancer. He was 78.

Bertelli won college football's highest honor during a season shortened by his serving in the Marine Corps. He played six games for the Fighting Irish before being called to active duty in World War II.

Pro Football Hall of Famer Marion Motley, a bruising fullback for the Cleveland Browns and one of the first black players of the modern era, died Sunday. He was 79.

Motley had prostate cancer for at least a year. He died Sunday morning at his son's Cleveland home, Hall of Fame spokesman Joe Horrigan said.

Motley, a 6-foot-1, 240-pound fullback, rushed for 4,720 yards in nine pro seasons in the All-America Football Conference and National Football League.

He led the NFL in rushing with 810 yards on 140 carries in 1950, the Browns' first season in the NFL.

Motley was also the AAFC's career leading rusher with 3,024 yards. Along with fellow Hall of Fame quarterback Otto Graham and kicker Lou Groza, the Browns won AAFC championship all four years the league existed.

HORSE RACING:

Real Quiet, the 4-year-old colt that just missed winning the Triple Crown last year, found running room on the rail and edged ahead in the final strides Sunday to win the $1 million Hollywood Gold Cup.

Ridden for the first time by Jerry Bailey, the Bob Baffert-trained Real Quiet finished a half-length in front of Budroyale, who edged Malek by a neck.