Originally created 05/29/99

Muses about child-parent relations 052999 - The Augusta Chronicle



During my school years (I graduated in 1946), I was taught positives such as respect for parents, teachers and the law, reverence for God and His Word, and I did not dare touch my Dad's guns without his express approval. It is without question that the concept of right and wrong "way back then" was not perfect. However we didn't turn out that bad.

I list the following negativesthat cause many a child/parent breakdown and sorrow.

Re the May 5 letter by Susan and Cory Kinney:

The fact that God gave Solomon a brilliant mind on how to raise children (among other things) should be respected. (See Proverbs 22:6 and 15 and also Ephesians 6:1-4.) But to neither correct, discipline or paddle a disobedient and rebellious child at home when needed, nor permit anyone else to do so, is asking for trouble sooner or later.

Re the May 8 column by Rabbi Alex Greenbaum:

By refusing to interfere with a child's choices when they are making moral, spiritual and social decisions is to guarantee a large percentage of them will be made on the basis of "feel good for the moment." It is not OK to call God "she." Today's "politically correct crowd" have no scriptural authority to ignore the fact that God is always referred to in masculine terms. ...

Re the May 10 Associated Press article, "Complaints swamp ACLU after shootings":

To employ such "professionals" as the controversial American Civil Liberties Union to guarantee "children's rights" is to guarantee that everyone remains like a ship in unchartered waters without a qualified helmsman atthe controls. Apparently, the only "rights" parents and educators have (those who are truly concerned about their children's and student's education and outcome) is to pay all the bills and let the government say what to teach. ...

After 50 years of unparalleled freedom, it would be easier to put toothpaste back in the tube than return child supervision to parents, where it belongs.

While no one doubts today's average child's intelligence, history and our daily news shows that when second and third generation children constantly enter the adult world at progressively earlier ages, mental burnout and tragedy are bound to increase.

But after all, these are among the signs proving that we are living in the latter days (II Timothy 3:1-5).

J. F. Rodgers, Clearwater