Originally created 02/11/99

Believes prayer influenced vote 021199 - The Augusta Chronicle



On the eve of the Senate vote to dismiss the trial of President Bill Clinton and of the vote to hear witnesses, I enjoyed one of those rare events of a lifetime. Along with six other concerned Christians from Augusta, I traveled to Washington, D.C., for the sole purpose of praying for our country.

We made the trip because we believe in the power of prayer, and because we each felt the Holy Spirit urging us to "be there" where the prayer was needed. ...

My friends and I spent the morning walking around the U.S. Capitol praying intercessory prayers and doing spiritual warfare for our country, for our senators, for the House managers and for the president. In the early afternoon we were all there for the two historic votes taken in the Senate.

I prayed earnestly that God would bring His justice to the trial and that He would break the confusion and heal the political bitterness that surrounds the deliberations. As it turned out, the vote to dismiss was defeated and the vote to hear witnesses passed. ...

Having recovered from the loss of nearly two nights' sleep and a day's work, I can still honestly say that "being there and doing that" was a life-changing experience for me. I believe our small efforts and simple obedience to God affected the political process somehow, even if in a small way.

If Christian citizens of the United States want a country where both justice and ethics are tied to truth rather than political expediency, I would urge increased commitment to take faith-filled action. Though some may be able to have great impact on the system while others may not, everyone can do something to change things. ...

Everyone can make a difference, even if in a small way. Maybe the difference could be made through letters of encouragement to congressmen or senators; maybe it could be through successful, local actions that could be used as a model for others. ...

Bob Garrett, Augusta