Originally created 05/27/98

Twins top class together



Len and Luke Clamp have done everything else together throughout their high school careers. Why should their graduation be any different?

The identical twins each have 4.0 grade point averages and will stand side by side as co-salutatorians of Williston-Elko High School's Class of 1998 on Friday, at Williston-Elko Stadium. It's the first time in recent school history that two siblings, not to mention twins, have graduated so high in their class.

For the Clamp twins, two heads have been better than one.

"We've always studied together and I think that was helpful to our achieving in the classroom," said Len.

Luke said they tried to maintain the same class schedule since ninth grade, so that if one was sick the other could collect the assignments or if one was struggling with course material the other could help out.

"It helps out a lot when you're studying, because there are some things he's strong on in a chapter and some things I'm strong on in the chapter," said Luke.

They don't claim to read each others thoughts, but when they took the Scholastic Aptitude Test the first time they received identical scores on the test.

It's hard to find these two brothers separated from one another.

"We've always been together and done everything together since, well, since we were born," said Len.

Len and Luke have been Eagle Scouts together, served as senior class officers, yearbook staff and on the student council, held part-time jobs at the same delicatessen, and even done some double-dating.

"I don't think there is anything we don't do together," said Len.

Both played football and baseball all four years in school and they say the ball field is where they are more competitive with each other.

In football, Len played offensive guard and linebacker, and Luke played offensive tackle for the Blue Devils.

"We didn't line up against each other very often, but when we did there was some pretty hard hitting," said Luke, the bigger of the two.

Making a decision on college nearly severed this brotherly union, when Luke considered going to the College of Charleston and Len had his mind set on Clemson University. Luke changed his mind because he thought it would be easier for the whole family if the two went to the same school.

"We've been together so long it would've been tough to split up then," Luke said.

Luke plans to study secondary science education with the hopes of becoming a physical therapist or a teacher andcoach, and Len plans to study marketing and hasn't decided on a career goal yet.

Luke says graduating as co-salutatorians brings their high school years to a fitting close.

"We've done so much together," he says. "We're finishing it like it should be."