Originally created 08/17/97

Questions coverage of UPS strike



I'm stuck with a couple of questions and a couple of possible solutions on the United Parcel Service strike. First, why, with all of the other interesting and important news, has the media chosen to highlight this incident?

After all, it's a labor dispute. OK, it is a large labor dispute, but if left alone the economy will take care of UPS employees' concerns and those of UPS management (if there is such an entity).

If the union wants to put more full time workers to work, here is an idea. It looks like with just quick calculations that it would take the salary of two part-time workers to compensate one full-time worker. Just get rid of two part-time workers and make one of them a full-time worker. Of course that means there would be more packages to go around for the full-time employees to handle.

Some of the loss here could certainly be offset by paying UPS investors less on their stocks or funds or whatever. The one thing I don't think future UPS customers will want to hear about, is an increase in the cost of their unreliable service.

It is unreliable, only, because, as a customer, you get held "hostage" anytime the workers want to hold you hostage or the union wants to hold you hostage. ...

Do the UPS workers, now on strike, have any suggestions about where the extra dollars can come from if they give more people more money?

If UPS doesn't work out its problems, there are others who will be happy to take care of the UPS customers that UPS doesn't want to take care of.

UPS workers should ask the following question, "If I don't take care of my customers, who will?" Probably Federal Express, Pony Express or Roadway. They will eventually "out hustle" some of the best hustlers I have ever seen, and I use the word "hustle" here as a compliment to the UPS workers while on the job. ...

Andy Lowe, New Ellenton