Originally created 11/19/96

Companies to show off at jet show



SAVANNAH - The newest stars in the international business jet industry - one from Savannah, the other from Canada - are expected to draw a crowd this week in Orlando, Fla.

Gulfstream Aerospace Corp.'s new jet, the Gulfstream V, and Bombardier's Global Express will be attractions at the 49th annual meeting of the National Business Aircraft Association in Orlando.

Bombardier is one of Gulfstream's main competitors in the heated business jet industry, analysts say.

Gulfstream, a leading international producer of large business jets, has its main manufacturing facilities at Savannah International Airport and is Chatham County's largest industrial employer.

The Savannah-built jet going to Orlando is the first Gulfstream V to be fully completed, said David Henderson, Gulfstream director of corporate communications.

"The finishing touches on the interior are being done, and the plane will be in Orlando and ready," Mr. Henderson said.

Four other Gulfstream V's are in a continuing flight-testing program and have flown more than 950 hours during about 450 flights. They will not be taken to Orlando, Mr. Henderson said.

Leo Knaapen, a spokesman for Bombardier in Montreal, said the Orlando show will mark the international debut of the Global Express, which made its first flight Aug. 26.

The Gulfstream V's maiden flight was Nov. 18, 1995.

While the Gulfstream V will be the company's only plane on public display in Orlando, Bombardier plans to have its entire family of business jets at the meeting.

According to Mr. Knaapen, the meeting will be the first time ever that all of Bombardier's business jets will be on display in one location.

"The display will include the new Global Express, the Learjet 45, the Canadair Special Edition, the Challenger 604, the Learjet 81A and the Learjet 60," Mr. Knaapen said.

Gulfstream expects to begin delivery of the new Gulfstream V to customers before the end of the year. Deliveries of the Bombardier Global Express are not expected to begin until late next year.