Phinizy Swamp Wildlife Management Area takes on cleaner look

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Sometimes convenience can be a curse.

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Phinizy Swamp Wildlife Management Area has benefitted from a cleanup and road rehabilitation project headed up by the Wildlife Resources Division.  GEORGIA DNR
GEORGIA DNR
Phinizy Swamp Wildlife Management Area has benefitted from a cleanup and road rehabilitation project headed up by the Wildlife Resources Division.
Video: Augusta Outdoors
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That’s often the case with Phinizy Swamp Wildlife Management Area – a public wilderness so close to downtown Augusta that it seems to collect more than its share of vandalism, litter and general disrespect.

This season, however, hunters who visit the 1,500-acre site will enjoy a cleaned up, widened access road, courtesy of an in-house project organized by the Wildlife Resources Division.

“I hunted it last year and was very surprised how many people hunt out there during waterfowl season,” said Lee Taylor, the regional game management supervisor for Georgia’s Wildlife Resources Division. “But it was so crowded – and it was so dirty.”

Using bulldozers, tractors and trucks from various wildlife management areas – and assistance from wildlife techs and area managers – the cleanup and road rehabilitation was accomplished in about a week.

Now there is plenty of parking and – at least for now – none of the litter commonly dumped at the end of Gravel Pit Road, which leads to the WMA’s main access road.

“We think this will not only make it accessible to users, help keep it cleaner,” Taylor said. “If you make it nice, people will take better care of it.”

The parcel has two access points, both off of Doug Barnard Parkway.

It is open for archery-only deer hunting, but most widely known for waterfowl hunting, which is allowed Wednesdays and Saturdays during the state seasons.

SALUDA TROUT BRIEFING: The CSRA Fly Fishers group will meet at 7 p.m. Monday at the clubhouse at River Island in Evans.

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources fisheries biologist Ron Ahle will discuss the most recent studies of the Saluda River near Lexington, S.C., which supports a popular recreational trout fishery.

For more information, visit www.csraflyfishers.org.


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