John Isner has short day

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LONDON — Three years ago at Wimbledon, John Isner took part in the longest match in tennis history.

John Isner, who played in the longest match in tennis history three years ago, had to withdraw in the third game Wednesday because  of a knee injury.  ALASTAIR GRANT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALASTAIR GRANT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Isner, who played in the longest match in tennis history three years ago, had to withdraw in the third game Wednesday because of a knee injury.

On Wednesday at the All England Club, the former Georgia Bulldog was hardly on the court long enough to break a sweat.

The 18th-seeded American pulled out in the third game of his second-round match against Adrian Mannarino with a left knee injury.

Isner, who was trying to make the third round of Wimbledon for the first time, said he landed awkwardly after serving the third point of the match.

“It didn’t pop,” Isner said. “It just grabbed, like, really badly, and I knew I was in serious trouble then. I mean, I knew at that point it was not likely I was going to be able to play.”

During the second game, Isner called for a medical timeout and had his knee wrapped, but when he resumed, he was clearly hobbled and unable to track down the ball. He lost the second game and after the first point in the third, he decided to stop.

The retirement came three years after Isner won the longest match in tennis history, beating Nicolas Mahut 70-68 in the fifth set in a Wimbledon match that lasted more than 11 hours over three days.

Earlier this year, Isner pulled out of the Australian Open with a right knee injury.

He was scheduled for more tests later Wednesday to determine the extent of the injury.

“I just can’t bend my knee,” Isner said about 30 minutes after leaving the court. “I can walk as long as I keep it straight. So it’s just putting any sort of weight. I couldn’t even bend the slightest, and I still can’t.”

NEW ARENA: About 20 minutes before playing only her fourth Grand Slam match, against a woman who won a major championship and was ranked No. 1, 19-year-old Eugenie Bouchard got a bit of interesting news.

Instead of Wimbledon’s 1,089-seat, out-of-the-way Court 12, the Canadian would be facing Ana Ivanovic at Centre Court, with room for nearly 15,000 spectators.

Cause for concern? Nerves? Nah.

“I was really excited. It was kind of a big deal to me. ... It’s what everyone wants to do. So, yeah, it was a great opportunity for me,” the 66th-ranked Bouchard said. “I definitely was calm and felt like I could do this. It worked out.”

It most certainly did. Bouchard picked up the biggest victory of her nascent career Wednesday, beating the 12th-seeded Ivanovic 6-3, 6-3 to reach the third round at the All England Club.

“It’s a long way from when she was 5 years old and she started in the juniors at the local club. To me, Centre Court at Wimbledon is the temple of tennis so it was a little surreal seeing her walk out there,” said Bouchard’s mother, Julie.

“I think she was calmer than I was. I was dying inside. I was like, ‘How can she even walk out there?’ But she’s been planning and working toward this for 14 years. So I’m obviously very proud.”

She attended her daughter’s news conference, as did Bouchard’s twin sister, Beatrice, and 14-year-old brother, William.

ELITE GROUP: American Sloane Stephens advanced to the third round of Wimbledon with a 7-6 (2), 2-6, 8-6 win over Andrea Petkovic.

The 20-year-old Stephens is one of nine women to reach the second week at the 2013 Australian and French Opens and will make it that far at Wimbledon with one more victory.

She played her first Grand Slam semifinal at the Australian Open in January after upsetting Serena Williams. At the French Open, she made it to the fourth round.


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