Alberto Contador might appeal two-year suspension

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MADRID — Spanish cyclist Alberto Contador says he might appeal the two-year doping ban handed down by sport’s highest court.

Contador says he is innocent and has no plans to retire despite hinting previously that he might quit if banned.

He spoke a day after the Court of Arbitration for Sport stripped him of the 2010 Tour de France title. CAS rejected his claim that his positive drug test for clenbuterol was caused by eating contaminated meat.

Contador says his lawyers are examining whether to appeal.

ULLRICH RULING: Sport’s highest court will issue a second verdict this week involving a doping case against a Tour de France winner.

The CAS said Tuesday it will publish a ruling Thursday on an appeal filed by the International Cycling Union to have 1997 Tour winner Jan Ullrich investigated for links to Operation Puerto, a 2006 Spanish doping probe.

Cycling’s governing body challenged the Swiss Olympic committee’s decision not to investigate Ullrich, a retired German racer who held a Swiss license.

Ullrich served a six-month ban for using amphetamines in 2002, and a second offense could trigger a life ban from working in cycling.

The CAS ruling Thursday might not end the case. The panel could opt to make a definitive ruling on Ullrich’s alleged doping links, or send the case back to the Swiss Olympic committee for a fresh hearing.

Swiss officials said last year they have no authority over Ullrich, who gave up his license in 2006.

ARMSTRONG CASE: The World Anti-Doping Agency on Tuesday urged U.S. federal authorities to quickly hand over evidence collected in their lengthy probe into seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong and doping in American cycling.

WADA president John Fahey said federal agencies in the United States gathered “significant evidence” in the criminal investigation that was abruptly closed last week with no charges filed and no explanation given.

Fahey said it would be “very, very helpful if that information was handed over” to the U.S Anti-Doping Agency.


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