Lance Armstrong returns his Olympic bronze medal from 2000 Games

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AUSTIN, Texas — Lance Armstrong has returned his Olympic bronze cycling medal, the latest fallout from his confession to using performance-enhancing drugs.

Lance Armstrong: Cyclist returned his 2000 bronze medal after admitting to doping.  ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lance Armstrong: Cyclist returned his 2000 bronze medal after admitting to doping.

Armstrong won the medal at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney. The International Olympic Committee in January vacated the medal Armstrong won in the road time trial. Armstrong tweeted Thursday that he have given it back and a U.S. Olympic Committee spokesman released a statement confirming its return.

Armstrong’s tweet included a photo of the medal and its blue ribbon along with the message: “The 2000 Bronze is back in possession of @usolympics and will be in Switzerland asap.”

Armstrong declined further comment.

The IOC has said it will not reallocate Armstrong’s bronze medal, just as cycling’s ruling body decided not to declare any winners for the Tour titles once held by the American. Spanish rider Abraham Olano Manzano, who finished fourth in Sydney, will not be upgraded and the bronze medal will be left vacant in Olympic records.

Armstrong denied doping for years until his confession in January in an interview with Oprah Winfrey. The confession came after a U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report detailed widespread use of performance-enhancing drugs by Armstrong and his U.S. Postal Service team. Armstrong also has been stripped of the seven Tour de France titles he won from 1999-2005.

The IOC previously stripped Tyler Hamilton, a former Armstrong teammate, of his time-trial gold medal from the 2004 Olympics after he acknowledged doping.

Armstrong won his medal two months after winning his second Tour de France title. His U.S. Postal Service teammate, Vyacheslav Ekimov of Russia, won the gold and Jan Ullrich of Germany won silver.

Ekimov was Armstrong’s teammate during the time period in which USADA outlined widespread doping on the team. Ullrich, who was a chief rival of Armstrong and finished second to him in the Tour de France three times, confirmed in an interview with a German magazine in June that he used blood-doping treatments during his career.

SOCHI CONCERNS: Russia’s new law banning gay “propaganda” could end up tarnishing the upcoming Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, two-time Olympic gold-medal winner Seth Wescott said, becoming the latest Western voice to condemn the law.

Wescott criticized the International Olympic Committee on Wednesday for selecting Sochi to host the 2014 games, saying the city hadn’t proven it had the ability to hold the event. The new Russian law that prohibits the promotion of “nontraditional” sexual relations could further sully the completion, he said.

“The human rights stuff that’s going on, there’s a potential for it to be an incredibly negatively-overshadowed Olympics,” he told The Associated Press.

Wescott, who lives in western Maine’s Carrabassett Valley near Sugarloaf ski resort, won gold medals in snowboard cross in the 2006 and 2010 Olympics.

Wescott, 37, said he has sufficiently recovered since undergoing knee surgery in April to attempt to qualify for the upcoming Olympics during races in December and January.

In an interview, Wescott and Alex Tuttle, another Olympic snowboard cross hopeful from Carrabassett Valley, said Sochi didn’t appear to be prepared for the Olympics when they visited there last February, and that they’re concerned there will be a lack of snow for snowboard events.

The buildup to the Feb. 7-23 games has also been overshadowed by the Western backlash to the gay-rights law, which has been denounced by activists and President Barack Obama.

The IOC and the Sochi Olympics media office didn’t immediately respond to emails seeking comment.

But at an IOC meeting Sunday in Argentina, the head of the Sochi Olympics asked the IOC to help “stop this campaign and this speculation” related to the anti-gay law. A senior IOC member said sponsors are afraid of the fallout of possible demonstrations in Sochi.

The IOC has said athletes can express themselves before the Olympics and outside the games’ venues, but that it doesn’t want the games themselves used as a platform for demonstrations.

Wescott said he has female friends in snowboarding who are lesbians.

‘’They’re wonderful human beings, and I think for them to be discriminated against is a crime,” he said. “They should be able to be who they are and compete proudly. They represent our country incredibly well and they don’t need to be the object of that kind of criticism and negativity.”


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