Badminton format will be scrutinized

  • Follow Olympics

LONDON — The format of Olympic badminton will be reviewed to avoid a repeat of the match-throwing scandal that blighted the London Games, but the governing body of the sport said Sunday no changes were guaranteed.

Thomas Lund, general secretary of the Badminton World Federation, said a full tournament evaluation will be presented at a federation meeting in November, including a report on the debut of group play in London.

Four women’s doubles pairs – the gold medal favorites from China, plus two from South Korea and one from Indonesia – took advantage of the format by trying to lose group matches to give themselves easier quarterfinal matchups. They were disqualified.

Lund said the federation regarded the group system, in which teams play a set of games before a knockout tournament, as “a big success” compared with having only a tournament.

PHELPS IN RETIREMENT: On the first day of the rest of his life, Michael Phelps found old habits are hard to break.

He got up around 6 in the morning Sunday, as he did while he was training.

Phelps can start sleeping later now, having ended his swimming career in London as the most decorated Olympian ever with 18 golds, 22 medals overall.

He hasn’t officially signed his retirement papers, but says he’ll be doing that “very soon.”

LOCHTE NOT DONE: If you thought Ryan Lochte might scale it back a bit after he failed to win more than one individual gold at the London Olympics, think again.

“I’m probably going to swim more events in 2016, and I’m going to swim as long as I’m having fun,” the American said Sunday.

“I’m definitely going to be training a lot differently and I’ll be training for more of the shorter events, so I’ll be cutting down my training a little.”

DOUGLAS FIRES BACK: Women’s gymnastics all-around champion Gabby Douglas likes her hairstyle just fine.

The 16-year-old, who became the first African-American to win all-around gold, said Sunday she was a little confused when she logged onto her computer after winning her second gold medal in three days and discovered people were debating her pulled-back look.

“I don’t know where this is coming from. What’s wrong with my hair?” said Douglas, the first U.S. gymnast to win gold in team and all-around competition. “I’m like, ‘I just made history and people are focused on my hair?’ It can be bald or short, it doesn’t matter about (my) hair.”

WEIGHTLIFTERS WITHDRAW: Two Ukrainian super heavyweights have joined the swelling ranks of weightlifters dropping out of the Olympics.

Ukraine’s Olympic Committee said Svetlana Cherniavska has not recovered from an injury she received a month ago and could not compete in the women’s plus-75 kilogram competition Sunday.

It also said men’s super heavyweight Artem Udachyn was injured during training and won’t take part in the plus-105 kilogram competition on Tuesday.

Other weightlifting dropouts include Ukrainian Artem Ivanov and Russians Dmitry Klokov, Khadzhimurat Akkaev and Oxana Slivenko.

Comments (1) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
Little Lamb
47219
Points
Little Lamb 08/06/12 - 07:44 am
0
0
What's Wrong

When you set up a tournament-type event, and the organizers set the brackets up, it would seem like a logical and reasonable approach for the athletes to study the brackets and plot a strategy that they think would be their best chance for overall victory. If the strategy led to throwing an earlier game to improve their chances in later games, what's the problem? Strategy is as much a part of sports as is the physical exertion.

Back to Top

Search Augusta jobs