NFL players, coaches fed up with replacement officials

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One official was pulled from duty because he’s a fan. Another negated a touchdown without ever throwing a penalty flag. Several others had difficulty with basic rules.

Replacement referee Jerry Frump makes a call in the fourth quarter of the Patriots-Titans game the season's first week.  FILE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
FILE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Replacement referee Jerry Frump makes a call in the fourth quarter of the Patriots-Titans game the season's first week.

Upon further review, Week 2 was a poor one for the NFL’s replacement officials.

Coaches and players around the league are losing patience and speaking out against the fill-in officials after a slew of questionable calls in Sunday’s games.

Some players are even joking about dipping into their own pockets to settle the contract dispute and get the regular officials back on the field immediately.

“I don’t know what they’re arguing about, but I got a couple of (million) on it, so let’s try to make it work,” Washington defensive back DeAngelo Hall said, kiddingly, on Monday. “I’m sure the locker room could pot up some cash and try to help the cause out.”

The NFL locked out the regular officials in June after their contract expired. Negotiations with the NFL Referees Association broke down several times during the summer, including just before the season, and the league is using replacements for the first time since 2001.

The results have been a mixed bag.

Just hours before kickoff Sunday, the NFL removed side judge Brian Stropolo from the New Orleans-Carolina game because it was discovered he’s a Saints fan.

And then came the on-field problems.

In Philadelphia’s 24-23 win over Baltimore, two game-altering calls left quarterback Joe Flacco and linebacker Ray Lewis fuming. It appeared on replay both calls were accurate as is. But that didn’t make it any less controversial.

Flacco’s scoring pass to receiver Jacoby Jones in the fourth quarter was called back because of offensive pass interference. The official who made the call didn’t throw the yellow flag, though he immediately signaled a penalty.

“I might sound like a little bit of a baby here,” Flacco said. “But for them to make that call, I think, was a little crazy.”

There was confusion later on during Philadelphia’s go-ahead drive. First, the two-minute warning occurred twice. Then, quarterback Michael Vick’s forward pass was called a fumble inside the Ravens 5. It was ruled incomplete after a replay, and Vick scored on the next play.

“It’s extra stress when you have to sit there and wait,” Vick said. “The one thing you don’t want to do, you don’t want to put the game in the officials’ hands.”

Lewis, like many players around the league, has seen enough.

“The time is now,” Lewis said. “How much longer are we going to keep going through this whole process? I don’t have the answer. I just know across the league teams and the league are being affected by it. It’s not just this game, it’s all across the league. And so if they want the league to have the same reputation it’s always had, they’ll address the problem. Get the regular referees in here and let the games play themselves out.

“We already have controversy enough with the regular refs calling the plays.”

Despite the outrage, the league backed the crew, a collection of college officials who have been studying NFL rules since the summer.

“Officiating is never perfect. The current officials have made great strides and are performing admirably under unprecedented scrutiny and great pressure,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said in an e-mail. “As we do every season, we will work to improve officiating and are confident that the game officials will show continued improvement.”

While some mistakes were judgment calls – such as a pass interference penalty on Pittsburgh defensive back Ike Taylor in which he appeared to miss a New York Jets receiver – the more egregious errors appear to be misinterpretations of rules.

In St. Louis’ 31-28 victory over Washington, Rams coach Jeff Fisher challenged a second-quarter fumble by running back Steven Jackson near the goal line and it was overturned. The Rams ended up kicking a field goal, which was the margin of victory.

The problem there was a coach is not allowed to challenge a play when a turnover is ruled on the field. It should’ve been a 15-yard penalty on Fisher. Also, if Fisher threw the challenge flag before the replay official initiated the review, a review is not allowed and the Redskins would’ve kept the ball.

“I just think that they’re just so inconsistent that it definitely has an effect on the games,” Redskins linebacker London Fletcher said. “You were hoping it would get better, but everybody is having to dealing with it.”

In the Cleveland-Cincinnati game, the clock continued to run after an incomplete pass by Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton in the second quarter. A total of 29 seconds ticked off, and the Browns ended the half with the ball at their 29. Perhaps an extra half-minute could’ve helped the drive. The Bengals won 34-27.

“Missed calls & bad calls are going to happen,” Browns linebacker Scott Fujita wrote on Twitter. “That’s part of the deal & we can all live with it. But not knowing all the rules and major procedural errors (like allowing the clock to run after an incomplete pass) are completely unacceptable. Enough already.”

In 2001, the lockout lasted for one week before a settlement was reached. This was the second week the replacements were used, and the NFL has drawn up a five-week schedule for them if the dispute is not resolved.

In Week 1, there was one major error, when the officials awarded Seattle an extra timeout in the final minutes of a game at Arizona. The Cardinals held on to win and the crew’s referee admitted the mistake.

“I don’t know if there’s a newfound appreciation or anything like that, but those guys have been doing it for a long time and they put a lot of time and hard work into going out there and doing this and seeing those games,” Flacco said about the regular officials. “It’s not easy to be down there and be officiating games that are going full speed at this level, so that’s my opinion of it.

“It’s tough to just get thrown right in there and be perfect.”

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bdouglas
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bdouglas 09/18/12 - 10:56 am
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On one hand, them complaining

On one hand, them complaining about their average $140K+ salary for working 30-40 days a year is a little ridiculous. But on the other hand, the filthy amount of profit the NFL is making puts the amount they're asking for at the 1/4 drop in the bucket level. I'm going to be in Tampa in a couple weeks and looked into catching my first NFL game while I'm there. The cheapest ticket in a decent seat was $250+! If that's the case, I'll stick with college football.

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