Flop proves expensive for Miami's Chris Bosh

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Miami Heat star Chris Bosh was fined $5,000 for flopping during Thursday’s Game 4 of the NBA Finals.

Miami Heat's Chris Bosh falls to the court during the first half of Game 7.  ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's Chris Bosh falls to the court during the first half of Game 7.

The NBA announced the fine Friday. The play happened midway through the second quarter with the Heat leading 41-32.

Bosh was trailing Spurs forward Tim Duncan as the two headed back down the court when Duncan established post position in the paint. As Spurs guard Gary Neal approached with the dribble, Duncan posted up a late-arriving Bosh to try to seal him away from the play. Bosh flailed his arms and fell to the ground.

Duncan was whistled for a foul on the play, which wiped away a layup for Neal.

Bosh, a former Georgia Tech star, had 20 points and 13 rebounds in the win that evened the series at two games apiece.

“He got into the battle. He got into the fight,” teammate Dwyane Wade said of Bosh. “He played big for us. Thirteen rebounds, that’s what we need from him and obviously 20 points. He played the way that we love to see Chris Bosh play.”

Maligned throughout much of the playoffs for relying almost too much on the long jumper and 3-point shot – he’s exceptional from the outside for a big man, but went 0 for 4 from 3-point range in Miami’s loss in Game 1 of the finals – Bosh quietly changed his approach.

In the next three games of the finals, he’s taken one 3-pointer, and that was a meaningless misfire with the Heat down by 26 points midway through the fourth quarter of San Antonio’s romp in Game 3. He’s had three straight double-doubles, just the second time that’s happened all season.

GOOD MOVE: Miami coach Eric Spoelstra’s decision to start Mike Miller in Game 4 sparked a flurry of trickledown effects. The Spurs went to their bench 47 seconds into the game. Miller’s mere presence helped open up some space for LeBron James and Wade, and their big scoring nights were no coincidence. It also gave Bosh extra room to maneuver inside, where he seemed active as he’d been at any point in the series.

“I was able to get in the paint a lot more,” Bosh said. “I think it really opened up my game a little bit. The jumper really wasn’t there in the first half, but it came eventually. I was just able to get in a really good flow.”

RATINGS DROP: The NBA Finals’ television viewership for Game 4 was down 7 percent from last year. Miami’s 109-93 win on the San Antonio Spurs on Thursday night on ABC averaged 16.2 million viewers. That’s down from 17.4 million for the Heat-Thunder series a year ago.


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