Opposing goaltenders in the Eastern Conference finals have had ups, downs

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PITTSBURGH — The NHL’s most unlikely postseason success story is nearly bald, his hairline an unwitting casualty to three decades spent hidden under a goaltender’s mask.

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Boston goalie Tuukka Rask, a starter in 2010, didn't hit the ice in the playoffs in 2011 as the Bruins won the Stanley Cup.  ELISE AMENDOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ELISE AMENDOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston goalie Tuukka Rask, a starter in 2010, didn't hit the ice in the playoffs in 2011 as the Bruins won the Stanley Cup.

All those long winters – including 16 in the best league in the world – never led to long springs, however, for Tomas Vokoun.

Until now.

Halfway through the 2013 Stanley Cup playoffs the two-time All-Star turned journeyman backup holds the key to the Pittsburgh Penguins’ playoff hopes. He is, for the first time in his life, the “hot goalie” during the most important time of year.

Heading into Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals against the Boston Bruins tonight, Vokoun’s numbers appear to be a misprint. Seven starts. Six wins. One very stoic and largely anonymous presence at the back of Pittsburgh’s star-laden attack.

Given a week to ponder his remarkable run after taking over for struggling Marc-Andre Fleury in Game 5 of the first-round series against the New York Islanders, Vokoun insists he’s trying not to think about what it all means, with varying levels of success.

“You just know that you’re playing well, you’re trying to do the right things,” Vokoun said. “You try not to treat it any differently, even if you know the stakes are just getting bigger.”

Vokoun never played on a team that made it past the opening round of the postseason until Pittsburgh ousted the Islanders in six games three weeks ago.

He was hardly overcome by the stage in the second round against Ottawa, allowing all of 11 goals in five games, including a pair of meaningless scores after the Penguins already had things well in hand during Game 4 and 5 routs.

Vokoun is at the opposite end of his career but enjoying the same kind of coming-out party. It’s uncharted territory for a player acquired for a mere seventh-round pick last summer as an insurance plan should Fleury falter.

“He has been one of the better goalies in NHL,” Pittsburgh general manager Ray Shero said. “He just happened to be playing in Nashville and Florida, not in the media spotlight.”

One that’s certainly going to ratchet up over the next two weeks. It can get unnerving. For proof, he need look only 180 feet down the ice tonight at Boston’s Tuukka Rask.

The Bruins were on the cusp of a berth in the conference finals in 2010 with a 22-year-old Rask leading the way. Boston took a 3-0 lead over Philadelphia in the second round when the season suddenly imploded. A 5-4 overtime loss in Game 4 morphed into three more defeats, including a 4-3 collapse in Game 7 when Rask squandered a three-goal, first-period lead.

Though he played 29 games the following season, he didn’t see a second of ice time in the playoffs as Tim Thomas carried the Bruins to their first title in nearly four decades.

“It’s different if you’re playing or if you’re not,” he said. “You had something to do with it on the ice.”

In the end, whichever goaltender finds his comfort zone is the one that will extend his team’s season. It’s a ride Vokoun is intent on enjoying, one the oldest player on the Stanley Cup favorite thought might never come.

“This is what you play for,” he said. “It’s taken a long time to get here. Yeah there’s pressure but really it’s just about doing your job. That’s all I can do.”


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