Tiger Woods says he's feeling better, ready to defend his title at Doral

  • Follow Golf

DORAL, Fla. — The only tools Tiger Woods used Wednesday at Doral were a wedge, a putter and a gold pair of scissors.

Three days after he withdrew in the middle of the final round at the Honda Classic with lower back pain, Woods returned to work at the Cadillac Championship by saying he feels better after constant treatment, and that he was good enough to try to defend his title.

He just won’t be playing the new Blue Monster until the opening round today. Still being cautious about back spasms, Woods only walked 18 holes to chip, putt and study a course that is entirely different from the one where he has won four times.

As for the scissors?

That was for the ceremonial opening of the Tiger Woods Villa at Trump National Doral.

Woods playing Doral was not a big surprise. The last time he dealt with back spasms in the final round was at The Barclays last August (he tied for second), and he played the following week outside Boston.

Even so, it was the second time in 10 tournaments that Woods experienced back pain during a round. It was the fourth time in five years that he withdrew in the middle of a round because of injury. For a guy with four surgeries on his left knee, the focus has shifted.

“I think we have to take a more global look at it, absolutely, because it comes and goes,” Woods said. “We’ve got to make sure that we do preventative things to make sure that it doesn’t happen and adjust certain things, whether it’s swing, lifting, whatever it may be. You have to make certain adjustments. We’ve done that throughout my entire career, and this is no different.”

His health is only part of the drama at Doral.

The lone applause at the end of a 20-minute press conference came from Donald Trump, who took over the resort. The majority of the 69-man field at this World Golf Championship is gearing up for the Masters Tournament in April.

The motivation for Woods is to complete 72 holes without injury. It’s being fit for the Masters, his next chance to end a five-year drought in the majors.

“It’s been a long couple days of just treatments nonstop, trying to get everything calmed down,” he said. “First of all, get all the inflammation out and from there, getting the firing sequence right again, getting everything firing in the proper sequence. And once we did that today, feels good.”

Woods hit balls Tuesday at his home, no shot longer than 60 yards, mainly an attempt to make sure he kept the feel with his hands on a golf club. His caddie came down to Doral and charted the course, giving Woods an idea of what to expect. That wouldn’t do it justice.

“I’m like, ‘What? There’s water on that hole?’ ” Woods said.

There is water just about everywhere, including a new lake on the 15th and 16th holes that figures to play a big role in the Sunday finish.

The real concern is Woods’ back.

“A bad back is something that is no joke,” he said. “With the back, it’s a totally different deal. There are certain movements you just can’t do. That’s one of the things I’ve started to learn about this type of injury. It’s very different.”


Top headlines

Clemson halts mandatory student sex survey

CLEMSON, S.C. - Clemson says it has suspended a mandatory survey of students the school says was part of a review to prevent sexual discrimination, harassment and assault.
Search Augusta jobs