Rory McIlroy begins U.S. schedule with Match Play Championship

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Rory McIlroy watches his tee shot on the 18th hole during a practice round for the Match Play Championship golf tournament on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 in Marana, Ariz. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)  Chris Carlson
Chris Carlson
Rory McIlroy watches his tee shot on the 18th hole during a practice round for the Match Play Championship golf tournament on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 in Marana, Ariz. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Rory McIlroy makes his American debut this week in the Match Play Champ­ionship in Marana, Ariz. The only goal is to make sure it’s not a short week.

McIlroy appears to be close to regaining the form that made him No. 1 in the world. He began his season on the European Tour with two good chances to win at Abu Dhabi and Dubai. So his expectations would seem to be high.

Just not here.

“What is a good week?” said McIlroy, the No. 4 seed in a 64-man field at Dove Mountain. “You could shoot 67 tomorrow and be going home. It’s hard to know. It’s hard to even put a sort of number on it. ‘OK, if I get to the quarterfinals, it’s a good week.’ You just have to take it one match at a time.”

The Accenture Match Play Championship, which starts today in the high desert north of Tucson, is the most unpredictable event in golf.

Tiger Woods is the only No. 1 seed to win, and he’s not at Dove Mountain this year.

SINGH’S CASE: Vijay Singh received a key ruling in his lawsuit against the PGA Tour when a judge allowed his complaint that he was treated differently from other players under the tour’s anti-doping policy.

Judge Eileen Bransten ruled Monday in New York State Supreme Court on the tour’s motion to dismiss.

She ruled in favor of the PGA Tour on five elements, but Bransten sided with Singh on his allegations that some players received different treatment.

In the order, Singh claims the tour knew of players who used deer antler spray and did not attempt to punish them.

Singh admitted in a Sports Illustrated article last year that he used the spray.


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