Tiger Woods wins Chevron World Challenge to end two-year drought

After two-year wait, Tiger is winner again

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THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. — After going more than two years and 26 tournaments without a win, and after so much turmoil in his personal life and with his golf game, Tiger Woods stood over a 6-foot birdie putt Sunday to win the Chevron World Challenge and felt as though nothing had changed.

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Tiger Woods reacts after winning the Chevron World Challenge. It was his first win since Nov. 15, 2009, just before the scandal that sent his life into a tailspin.  MARK J. TERRILL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
MARK J. TERRILL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods reacts after winning the Chevron World Challenge. It was his first win since Nov. 15, 2009, just before the scandal that sent his life into a tailspin.

Finally, the outcome was familiar, too.

Woods poured in the putt to cap off a birdie-birdie finish at Sherwood, close with 3-under-par 69 and beat former Masters Tournament champion Zach Johnson by one shot. The win ended a drought that lasted 749 days, and might have signaled a change that Woods is on his way back.

He swept his arm across the air, yelled through the din of the gallery and slammed his fist in a celebration that was a long time coming.

Relief? Satisfaction? Vindication?

Woods wasn’t sure, and he didn’t much care.

“It just feels awesome whatever it is,” he said.

Trailing by one shot with two holes to play, Woods came up with two clutch putts. He holed a 15-footer for birdie on the par-3 17th to pull into a tie with Johnson, then hit a 9-iron from 158 yards that landed on the ridge behind the hole and rolled down to 6 feet.

“I’ve been in contention twice this year, which is not very often,” Woods said. “So that’s my third time with a chance to win it. I pulled it off this time.”

It was his 83rd win worldwide in tournaments that award ranking points, but his first since he won the Australian Masters on Nov. 15, 2009, back when he looked as though he would rule golf for as long as he played.

But he crashed his car into a fire hydrant outside his Florida home on Thanksgiving night, and shocking revelations of extramarital affairs began to emerge, which shattered his image, led to a divorce and cost him four major sponsors. Since then, he has changed swing coaches, caddies and endured more
injuries, causing him to miss two majors and fail to make the cut in another.

Now, however, it looks clear that Woods is on an upward path.

“If the man is healthy, that’s paramount,” Johnson said. “I mean, he’s the most experienced and the best player I’ve ever played with. In every situation, he knows how to execute and win.”

Even though those situations have been rare, Woods looked as though he had not forgotten how to win. The only other times he has been in contention this year were the Masters and the Australian Open.

Woods won the Chevron World Challenge, which he plays host to for his foundation, for the fifth time. He finished at 10-under 278 and donated the $1.2 million to his foundation.

The win moved him from No. 52 to No. 21 in the world ranking, and likely will send expectations soaring for 2012.

Woods will not play again until starting his year in Abu Dhabi at the end of January.

If this win felt differently than the last one, Woods wasn’t saying.

“They all feel good,” he said. “They’re not easy. People don’t realize how hard it is to win golf tournaments. I’ve gone on streaks where I’ve won golf tournaments in a row, but still … I don’t think I’ve taken it for granted. And I know because of how hard it is.”

Johnson closed with 71 and still took home $650,000. Paul Casey, who opened with 79, had his third consecutive round in the 60s to finish alone in third at 5-under.

Woods’ tournament, which has an 18-man field, has been a good omen for others over the years.

The most recent example was Jim Furyk, who won in 2009 and then had his first three-win season the next year and captured the FedEx Cup.

No one ever imagined Woods needing a boost, but that might be the case.

“I don’t think we’re going to see another 2011, if that makes sense,” Furyk said, alluding to Woods failing to reach the FedEx Cup playoffs this year. “If he steadily progresses, keeps getting confidence and moving forward, he’s going to return and be one of the best players in the game again.”

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etlinks
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etlinks 12/05/11 - 08:34 am
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Good for him. His babies are

Good for him. His babies are watching now so hopefully he will perform like a pro.

Chillen
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Chillen 12/05/11 - 11:03 am
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Yawn.

Yawn.

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