Missouri still seeking first SEC win

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The starting quarterback is out, the offensive line is in tatters and the opponent apparently is without flaw.

No wonder Missouri is a three-touchdown underdog to top-ranked Alabama heading into today’s game.

Coming off a deflating upset loss at home to Vanderbilt, Missouri (3-3, 0-3 Southeastern Conference) is still seeking that elusive first SEC victory.

Alabama (5-0, 2-0) has won eight in a row by 19 or more points, and it’s been five years since its last loss to an unranked opponent.

That leaves Nick Saban to conjure adversity, and he portrays the school’s first visit to Missouri since 1978, and just the fourth overall meeting between the schools, as a major challenge. Perhaps that’s out of deference for his former Kent State teammate, Missouri coach Gary Pinkel.

Earlier this week, Saban pointed out the frequent upsets this season while chiding reporters who perhaps have prejudged this an easy win.

“The teams that most of you in this room make head and shoulders above other teams obviously showed you how badly you can be mistaken,” Saban said. “I know I can be mistaken and get criticized, but you all are badly mistaken when you make teams so much better than everybody else.”

OREGON: The team suspended senior defensive tackle Isaac Remington indefinitely after he was cited for driving under the influence.

BAYLOR: A few things have changed since the Bears and Texas Christian played their wild season-opening game last year.

For the first time in 17 years, the Bears and Horned Frogs will play as conference rivals after TCU’s addition to the Big 12 this summer.

Robert Griffin III, who started his Heisman Trophy-winning season with five touchdown passes in Baylor’s 50-48 victory a year ago, is now starting for the Washington Redskins. And Casey Pachall, the TCU quarterback who threw three touchdowns in the fourth quarter in his starting debut that night, is no longer with the Horned Frogs after helping them start 4-0 this season.

Pachall withdrew from school this week and entered an inpatient treatment program.

ARKANSAS: An attorney for coach John L. Smith said Friday that a computer error in his bankruptcy case is behind what appeared to be a huge jump in his debt.

Smith’s initial Chapter 7 filing in September listed $25.7 million in debt. He later amended that to $40.7 million, blaming land deals gone bad in Kentucky. Attorney Jill Jacoway, speaking during a hearing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, said the computer error resulted in her assistant listing $25.7 million in debt. She said the error resulted in a rough draft being filed rather than a completed one.

“We cussed out our computer provider,” Jacoway said. “We cussed out our computer guys.”

Smith was accompanied by wife Diana and Jacoway during the hearing at which he was asked by trustee John Lee about any possible assets he might have, including any possible inheritance from his parents and brother Bart, who passed away Sept. 17.

Smith, who said a counter-suit was still possible against one of his creditors, was also asked by attorneys for his creditors about the listed value of several of the land-development companies in which he was a partner.

“I’ve been out of the loop with my partners for over three years, so I don’t know any of the account details of any of the LLCs and what has taken place,” Smith said. “I have not been in the loop.”

The former Michigan State and Louisville coach is trying to wipe away his debt and hang onto $1.2 million in retirement accounts and some personal property, all while coaching Arkansas in the wake of the Bobby Petrino scandal. Petrino was fired in April following revelations he had hired his mistress to a position in the athletic department, and Smith was hired to replace him two weeks later.

Smith, who declined to comment after Friday’s meeting, told The Associated Press about his pending bankruptcy in July and Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long said he was aware of Smith’s financial problems when he hired him.

The Razorbacks (2-4, 1-2 Southeastern Conference), who host Kentucky (1-5, 0-3) on Saturday, have struggled this season. They have gone from a preseason top 10 team to one just hoping to earn a bowl berth.

Terry scheduled another meeting Friday for next month between Smith and his creditors, but Jacoway said any disputes could be worked out between the lawyers and Terry before then.

“It’s possible that John L. Smith will never see a judge,” Jacoway said. “It is very possible that everything is worked out, that everything is A-OK.”

Jacoway said the coach’s bankruptcy case could last as little as 90 days or up to two years.


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