Police have no record of Penn State assistant's claim

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STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Penn State campus police and their counterparts in State College said Wednesday that they had no record of Mike McQueary reporting an alleged sexual assault by Jerry Sandusky on a 10-year-old boy in a campus shower.

The details ran counter to McQueary’s claims in an e-mail to former teammates and made available to The Associated Press this week.

McQueary, then a graduate assistant, wrote in the e-mail that he had discussions with police about what he saw. In the e-mail, McQueary did not specify which police department he spoke to.

State College borough police chief Tom King said McQueary didn’t make a report to his department.

Campus police referred questions on the Sandusky case to the university’s public information office.

“At this point we have no record of any police report being filed in 2002” by McQueary in connection with the Sandusky case, university spokeswoman Annemarie Mountz said, adding police searched their records Wednesday.

Mountz also noted the 23-page grand jury report was the state attorney general’s summary of testimony, so it’s unclear what McQueary’s full testimony was.

The news came after a new judge was assigned to handle the child sex abuse charges against Sandusky, whose televised defense earlier this week drew a rebuke from a lawyer for one of his accusers.

The change removed a State College judge with ties to a charity founded by Sandusky for at-risk children, The Second Mile.

Harrisburg attorney Ben Andreozzi said he represents a client who will testify against Sandusky, who is accused of abusing eight boys, some on campus, over 15 years.

“I am appalled by the fact that Mr. Sandusky has elected to re-victimize these young men at a time when they should be healing,” Andreozzi said in a statement released by his office. “He fully intends to testify that he was severely sexually assaulted by Mr. Sandusky.”

SECOND MILE GRANT ON HOLD

PHILADELPHIA — A $3 million state grant that was earmarked for a youth charity established by a former Penn State football assistant coach at the heart of a child molestation scandal has been put on hold.

Gov. Tom Corbett said Wednesday he knew that The Second Mile’s founder, Jerry Sandusky, was gone from the organization when the grant was approved earlier this year. Corbett defended the decision to approve the grant while knowing about the allegations against Sandusky.

Corbett, a Republican, was the attorney general whose office in 2008 began the investigation into allegations of sexual contact between young boys and Sandusky, who founded the charity in 1977.

– Associated Press

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