Yankees' Robinson Cano isn't focusing on contract

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Cano   ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cano

Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano says his contract status is on his mind, though not a distraction.

Cano is due $15 million in the final season of what became a $57 million, six-year deal and is eligible for free agency after the World Series.

A day after Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said the team had made a significant offer during the off-season to Cano’s agent, Scott Boras, Cano declined to address the matter Friday but did say: “It’s never going to go out of your head.”

“I don’t want to be a distraction to the team,” Cano added. “Just focus on playing baseball.”

Cano hit .313 with 33 homers and 94 RBI last year but was 3 for 40 (.075) with no homers and four RBI during the playoffs, including a postseason-record 0 for 29 skid.

“I have one more year on my contract,” Cano said. “I have to perform and help the team win another championship.”

RANGERS: Right fielder Nelson Cruz was cleared of more serious issues Friday after team doctors diagnosed a muscle strain in his chest.

Assistant general manager Thad Levine said Cruz was sent to a hospital to rule out anything else.

The Rangers later said in a statement that several tests were negative and Cruz was being released after a stress test, which general manager Jon Daniels said he passed.

Cruz can resume baseball activities today.

“I think our guys made the right call,” Daniels said.

DODGERS: Outfielder Carl Crawford could miss his team’s April 1 opener after leaving spring training to have his elbow examined in Los Angeles.

Recovering from elbow ligament-replacement surgery on Aug. 23, Crawford felt nerve irritation in his left arm.

INDIANS: All-Star closer Chris Perez could be sidelined one month because of a strained shoulder.

Perez, who saved 39 games last season, will not throw for the next week to 10 days.

REDS: Signed 32-year-old, oft-injured pitcher Mark Prior to a minor league deal.


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