Curt Schilling says his fortune is 'probably all gone'

  • Follow Baseball

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling said Friday that the collapse of his 38 Studios video game company has probably cost him his entire baseball fortune, and he placed part of the blame on Rhode Island officials, including Gov. Lincoln Chafee.

Schilling  ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Schilling

Schilling said during a 90-minute interview on WEEI-FM in Boston that he put more than $50 million of his own money in the company and that he’s had to tell his family that “the money I saved during baseball was probably all gone.”

Schilling said he hopes to return to work soon as an analyst for ESPN. He took a leave of absence from the network after 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy protection on June 7.

The firm was lured to Providence from Massachu­setts in 2010 after Rhode Island offered a $75 million loan guarantee. The state is working to determine how much it’s on the hook for after the company’s collapse.

While he conceded that he “absolutely” was part of the reason the company failed, he said public comments made by Chafee in May questioning the firm’s solvency were harmful as the firm tried – but failed – to raise private capital to stay afloat.

“I think he had an agenda,” Schilling said about Chafee.

Chafee vocally opposed the state’s loan guarantee to 38 Studios when he was running for governor in 2010.

But after it was a done deal, he was the company’s “biggest cheerleader,” Chafee spokeswoman Christine Hunsinger said Friday. She had no other immediate comments on Schilling’s interview.

Schilling also accused Chafee of failing to work with an investor who was willing to put $15 million to $20 million into the company to help it succeed. He said the investor walked away because of Chafee’s inaction.

38 Studios laid off its entire workforce – nearly 300 employees in Providence and more in Maryland – in May.


Top headlines

SRS shipments halted until 2016

Savannah River Site can't resume shipments of Cold War nuclear waste materials to an underground repository in New Mexico until at least 2016 when the federal government reopens the facility to ...
Search Augusta jobs