Government

More News | | | Editor

A field of dreams

City will need financing plan to get Golf and Gardens property

  • Follow Baseball

Mayor Deke Copenhaver is warming up to ask Augusta commissioners to authorize city staff to create a financing package for a downtown baseball stadium, condominiums and retail complex on the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame property.

Back | Next
Conceptual drawings of a downtown stadium show an outfield backing up to the river,  office and condo buildings, and a steamboat-shaped restaurant at the levee level.  Special
Special
Conceptual drawings of a downtown stadium show an outfield backing up to the river, office and condo buildings, and a steamboat-shaped restaurant at the levee level.

The package, which would outline the proposed project and means of financing it, is needed for the city to get the property from the state this year, and drawing it up would cost nothing, the mayor said.

Without it, three years of working with Gov. Sonny Perdue and the State Properties Commission on acquiring the abandoned 17-acre tract will be all for naught, and the city will be back to square one, he said.

"There's a bond attached to the property that will not be paid off for another six years, so the large potential is that if we don't get something done this year, that property will sit empty, grow weeds and produce no tax revenue for the next six years," Copenhaver said.

In addition to paying $2.8 million for the property, possibly leasing it for six years, the city will have to hustle because the transfer must be approved by the Legislature this session and be signed off on by the governor.

It's a field of dreams for the mayor and those who support a new $38.7 million stadium for the Augusta GreenJackets.

But to others, including most Augusta commissioners, it's fantasy baseball -- a risky venture that could end up on taxpayers' backs.

The mayor said it's too early for commissioners to make that call.

"In order to support it or not support it, the first thing we have to have is that finance package, and we're not detailing anything solid right now," he said. "So until I can get their go-ahead to give our staff the directive of putting the finance package together, I don't think they can make an educated decision whether or not they support it."

It's a hard sell for most commissioners.

"Let somebody else do the plan, somebody that's interested in investing down there," Commissioner J.R. Hatney said. "You can't do a plan free."

The mayor talked to Commissioner Don Grantham on Monday about using the city's tax allocation districts and private investment to finance the project, but didn't convince him that the direct expenses won't be a future expense for the taxpayers.

"I don't see how you're going to avoid that," Grantham said.

The package the mayor presented Grantham didn't include what GreenJackets owner Cal Ripken Jr. would contribute toward making the facility viable, he said.

The mayor and Ripken Baseball executives contend that such ventures have been highly successful in other cities, such as Greenville, S.C.

Grantham also wondered who would pay for the stadium.

"Are we looking to the taxpayers, or is this a private investment?" he asked.

Copenhaver said it would be a public-private partnership and that when he submitted a proposal to the state, Jim Jacoby, the developer of the Atlantic Station in Atlanta, was on board as a partner.

"He is still a part of the project should it go forward," he said. "The portion of the property he's looking at -- one of the ideas he has for that property would be high-end residential condominiums, this being based on the fact that by the time you would complete this project the economy would have returned.

"What we're talking about is a mixed-use sports and entertainment facility that would have retail, eventually restaurants, banks. It would not just be a sole-use baseball stadium. They don't build them like that anymore."

The mayor said acquisition of the property requires that it have a project attached to it.

"If we do not have a project attached to it -- and nobody's come up with a Plan B -- there's no way we will get the property," he said.

The mayor says there can't be any specifics about the proposed project until a financing plan is put together, but specifics are what commissioners say they want.

When asked whether he would support authorizing city staff to draw up a financing plan, Mayor Pro Tem Alvin Mason said: "Plan for what? Is that all in one, or are you talking about options? Perhaps a baseball stadium? Perhaps condos? Or are you talking about one thing, or something all together? Or are you taking about options?

"It could be a mixed-use development that could be the best thing to do down there. It could be condos like we were supposed to have at Reynolds Street that never happened. I don't know."

The state could assign the property to another state entity, such as the Medical College of Georgia or Augusta State University, said George Snelling, a member of the State Properties Commission from Augusta.

"I'm not advocating that," he said. "I believe that could be a possibility. The state would want to see a viable project. The governor wants the state to get the absolute best deal it can."

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Botanical Gardens opened in 2001 and closed in June 2007, during a drought that killed many of the plants when the water was cut off.

Later that year, the city began maintaining the property, but it stopped last year as part of cost-cutting measures.

Copenhaver maintains that the baseball stadium is still the best hope for reviving the property. Last year, the state put out a request for proposals for other uses, and the only others were for a Goodwill Industries job-training center and an assisted-living complex.

Lake Olmstead Stadium

Cal Ripken Jr. bought the Augusta GreenJackets in 2005 and renovated Lake Olmstead Stadium.

Five years later, the stadium is the third smallest in the South Atlantic League.

A downtown stadium committee visited other cities in 2007. Released in February 2008, a feasibility study projected a new stadium could bring up to 350,000 people downtown each year.

Commissioners see tough sell
AGAINST

ALVIN MASON: The mayor pro tem said he wants to see numbers and options.

"It's kind of hard to vote for something you haven't seen."

DON GRANTHAM: "If anything needs to be done right now, it is to spruce up the baseball stadium we've got and do the best we can during this economic downturn," Grantham said. "It's just not wise to spend money on projects that will cost you added expense for the future. That's what a baseball stadium is. I don't think we'll fill it up."

J.R. HATNEY: He said he thinks private money should buy the land and build the stadium.

COREY JOHNSON: "I can't at this time. ... I just think we've got too many other things going on right now, and we just need to focus on finishing the judicial center, and also the TEE center and the things going on on Laney-Walker/Bethlehem. We still haven't gotten the money for that yet. The baseball stadium is something we need to deal with -- if we deal with it -- at a later date."

JERRY BRIGHAM: He said he wouldn't vote to have a financial package put together until he knew where the money would come from to buy the land and build a stadium. "We don't have any money," he said.

JIMMY SMITH: Augusta already has a good stadium that it has spent money on, he said, and parking would be a problem if one were built on the Golf and Gardens property. In response to the mayor's contention that if something isn't done with the property this year it will sit growing weeds for six more years, Mr. Smith said: "Well, it ain't hurting nothing. It ain't costing nothing."

LEANING AGAINST

JOE JACKSON: He said he has "several issues" with building a baseball stadium, one being the state of the economy. "Second, what is it going to cost?" he said. "I think it would be a good idea, but I don't know what it's going to cost. Third, what are we going to do with the stadium we've got?"

JOE BOWLES: If the stadium could be built without involving taxpayers, he said he's for it 100 percent, but he fears it could go belly-up in 10 years, leaving the city to pay off the debt.

UNCOMMITTED

BILL LOCKETT: He said he could support a baseball stadium but would have to know more about it. "It wouldn't be first on my list. There are many things much more urgent that would benefit the citizens of Augusta-Richmond County."

MATT AITKEN: "I really haven't had a chance to talk to my constituents. I didn't know condominiums was going to be tied into it."

-- Compiled by Sylvia Cooper

Mayor makes case

Augusta Mayor Deke Copenhaver wants to talk downtown baseball with Augusta commissioners at their retreat next weekend in Athens.

In an e-mail sent to commissioners Friday, the mayor said he wants to discuss "the potential for a mixed-use sports and entertainment facility (baseball stadium)" he envisions being built on the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame property.

He also wants their approval for the city's finance staff to put together a financing package that he said will cost nothing.

Other points the mayor makes in his e-mail include:

- An exploratory committee has completed its due diligence work, including a feasibility study; visits to stadiums in Greenville, S.C.; Greensboro, N.C.; and Durham, N.C.; and an economic impact study.

- The project has received resolutions of support from the Augusta Metro Chamber of Commerce, the Development Authority of Richmond County, the Greater Augusta Convention and Visitors Bureau and Augusta Tomorrow.

- It is also a part of the city's newly updated downtown master plan.

- His concern is that if the city does not act during this legislative session -- while Gov. Sonny Perdue, state Properties Director Steve Stancil and state Rep. Ben Harbin, R-Evans, are on board with the project -- an opportunity to get the property will be lost and it will sit vacant for the next six years, producing no tax revenue.

Downtown baseball stadium
At home

The Augusta GreenJackets hope to move  to the former Golf & Gardens  property from their current residence at Lake Olmstead Stadium off Milledge Road. The 4,822-seat stadium, built on top of the old Heaton Stadium site in 1995, underwent a $1.5 million upgrade starting in 2005, when Ripken Baseball Group purchased the team. Five years later, it’s the third-smallest stadium in the South Atlantic League.

“We’re starting to outgrow it,” GreenJackets General Manager Nick Brown said just before a feasibility study was released two years ago exploring the possibility of a downtown stadium. “Heaton Stadium was a glorified high school stadium, and now we’re just a glorified collegiate field.”

On the road

A downtown stadium exploratory committee made visits to Greenville, S.C., Greensboro, N.C., and Durham, N.C., during the summer of 2007. After the road trips, the committee decided to hire an independent consulting firm to conduct a feasibility study on the possibility of building a downtown stadium.

The study, released Feb. 28, 2008, said a downtown stadium would “potentially bring upwards of 350,000 patrons a year into the downtown area,” and estimated “a total Ballpark development cost of $31,830,000.”

Seven months later, Augusta Mayor Deke Copenhaver tried to boost support for the project from city commissioners but failed to gain a quorum at a called meeting.

Grass Greener in Greenville

Proponents of a downtown stadium point to similar venues in Greenville, S.C., and Durham, N.C., as examples of what could happen in Augusta. According to GreenvilleDrive.com, Fluor Field at the West End was completed in 2006 on an old lumber yard in downtown Greenville. The team went from an average attendance of 1,719 fans per game in 2005, before the new stadium was built, to at least 4,700 fans per game each of the next four seasons, bringing more than 340,000 people to the downtown area each year.

Not a rookie

Ripken Baseball Group, which purchased the GreenJackets in 2005, owns other minor league teams in Aberdeen, Md., and Port Charlotte, Fla. Both franchises have seen new stadiums built since the purchases. The Port Charlotte team benefited from a $27 million facilities renovation in 2009, thanks to a deal between the Tampa Bay Rays and the city of Port Charlotte that included a 20-year agreement to make the stadium the Rays’ spring training home.

Aberdeen’s Ripken Stadium was part of a $35 million complex completed in 2002, according to The Baltimore Sun, just before the first season of the Aberdeen Ironbirds.

– Billy Byler, staff writer

Comments (110) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
countyman
19100
Points
countyman 02/07/10 - 11:17 pm
0
0
Field of haters.... You keep

Field of haters.... You keep bringing up the past. In 2010 Richmond county will outperform the state of GA. THAT IS A FACT.
http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/latest/lat_704619.shtml?v=1636

A area that is declining or losing population would not be outperforming the state of GA in 2010. Especially when you have growing populations in Atlanta, Savannah, Columbus, Athens, etc. Only a area that is growing, improving, and adding jobs would outperformed the state. That describes Richmond county(growing, improving, adding jobs.

Emerydan
10
Points
Emerydan 02/07/10 - 11:13 pm
0
0
You don't learn from the

You don't learn from the past.. you are doomed to repeat it... and that's exactly what Augusta has been doing for 35 years or more. Augusta's priorities aree way out of line. You try going down to Hyde Park or South Augusta and convince folks that what Augusta needs right now is a ballpark.. Come on! the one we have is perfectly fine. Maybe some day in the futuire this can be entertained... but not now.. not in this economy.. not in the state Augusta is in when we have an LEC on the verge of collapse, and a Riverwalk and Museum we cannot maintain.. roads that are not fixed (how about a turning lane on 56??? may save some lives), schools that are in disarray..a new library that may be open 2 days out of the week. As I said.. look over at North Augusta.. Augusta needs to be more like them.. they have their priorities in order. they don't watse millions in tax money on ill conceived boondoggles that have proven to be failures.. they invest money in basic services and infrastructure that the residents need and want.

countyman
19100
Points
countyman 02/07/10 - 11:31 pm
0
0
Its not just a baseball park.

Its not just a baseball park. The development is a mix-use project. The developer of Atlantic Station in Atlanta is involved with Deke. The project will consist of retail, entertaiment, residential, and a baseball stadium.

Augusta is growing 100 times faster in 2010. Compared to 10 and 20 years ago. There is a big diffrence between harping on the past and learning from it.

There is a new $70 million Judicial Center under construction. It will open in a few months. Why do you get bringing up the LEC center. Do you even drive around Augusta?

Emerydan you're against the Tee Center too. So what else is new. You're against anything that improves the quality of life. Richmond county citizens VOTED FOR the Tee Center. It isn't the mayor who is out of touch with the citizens. You're out of touch with Richmond county voters.

Emerydan
10
Points
Emerydan 02/07/10 - 11:32 pm
0
0
Hopefully they will do a

Hopefully they will do a revival of Happy Days and deke can get the role he was meant to play, that of Richie Cunningham. he is obviously in over his head as mayor. Just because your daddy and the Boardmans can buy you the job doesn't mean you are the right person for the job.

countyman
19100
Points
countyman 02/08/10 - 12:02 am
0
0
Georgia Trend’s 100 Most

Georgia Trend’s 100 Most Influential Georgians

Mayor Deke Copenhaver #18 out of 100. He is being recognized for moving Augusta forward. Deke has the highest ranking of any mayor in the state. Mayor Otis Johnson of Savannah is next at #45.
http://www.georgiatrend.com/features-business-industry/01_10_migs.shtml

Emerydan
10
Points
Emerydan 02/08/10 - 12:01 am
0
0
Who reads Georgia Trend? The

Who reads Georgia Trend? The magazine is one chamber of commerce ad after another. The Boardmans probably bought that for deke to make him feel better. Influential? How has he been influential?.. what exactly has he done other than turn over some dirt with a shovel at a PR event? There are several big issues where Deke could have taken a lead.. and he didn't. If he was so darn influential, then why is just about everyone on the commission.. including the King of Pork, Don Grantham against his stadium idea? Deke has absolutely no influence at the marble palace. Everyone knows that Don Grantham is the puppet master... he runs the show. Deke is nothing more than an overpaid posterboy... "just smile for the camera Deke and look purdy... but don't talk unless we tell you to."

Emerydan
10
Points
Emerydan 02/08/10 - 12:03 am
0
0
If Deke ranks #18.. then

If Deke ranks #18.. then Georgia is in worse shape than I thought... if this is the best we have.. then we are surely doomed.

countyman
19100
Points
countyman 02/08/10 - 12:03 am
0
0
Georgia Trend is probably the

Georgia Trend is probably the most powerful magazine in the state

Emerydan
10
Points
Emerydan 02/08/10 - 12:16 am
0
0
You know countyman.. there

You know countyman.. there are medicines available for delusions of grandeur.

Emerydan
10
Points
Emerydan 02/08/10 - 12:20 am
0
0
Oh really... Georgia Trend is

Oh really... Georgia Trend is nothing but one big ad for the various chamber of commerce groups in the state.. they pay for these fluff pieces.. It's about as much a reputable news magazine as The natl Enquirer.. but atleast The Enquirer actually does some real news once in a while.. they did break the John Edwards story. georgia Trend is nothing more than a vanity mag for the self important.. every article in that mag reads like one big infomercial.. give me a break.

Jake1880
0
Points
Jake1880 02/08/10 - 12:51 am
0
0
Another tax increase going to

Another tax increase going to pay a non-essential bill! I am honestly starting to lose track of all the tax increases I’ve been hearing about lately. Not only are they thinking about this, but also of increasing grocery, gas, and cell phone taxes! This is not the best time to be raising taxes. I can honestly say that i know what it’s like to work hard day after day to hardly get by. Out legislators are supposed to do all in their power to alleviate that stress, not compound it! I for one cannot afford to pay more to feed my family or pay to keep my cell phone for business!

KNECKBONE
26
Points
KNECKBONE 02/08/10 - 02:08 am
0
0
Why not try to get a AA

Why not try to get a AA team.Heck AAA .Might as well go whole hog.Augusta is bigger than most teams in the SOUTHERN LEAGUE-AA

crackerjack
143
Points
crackerjack 02/08/10 - 05:18 am
0
0
Countyman, I seem to remember

Countyman, I seem to remember when the pink condos were built down by the riverfront with all the neat little retail stores, aaah it was a wonderful grand opening. Where are they now?

countyman
19100
Points
countyman 02/08/10 - 06:55 am
0
0
Crackerjack, the pink condos

Crackerjack, the pink condos still have people living in them. Several people are paying 350k and 400k to live in Port Royal. When the retail stores were there 25 years ago. There was nothing else surrounding them on the river. There was no foot traffic from a Tee Center, Hyatt, mix-use development, etc. Broad street didn't have First Friday and Artist Row like we do presently. Broad street wasn't as vibrant as it is today 25 years ago. There wasn't a saint sebastian, dental school, kroc center, library, judicial center, martha lester school residential, etc under construction downtown like today. The Green Building, Granite Mill, Sibley Hull House, Levy House, Stovall Barnes House, and Johnson Building weren't renovated residential areas like they are today. There wasn't the number of people moving downtown back then like they are today. Augusta wasn't gaining more people than metro Macon and metro Columbus back then either. Augusta also didn't have a $25 million Hyatt and $40 million Tee Center starting construction on Reynolds back then either. Augusta also wasn't investing $37.5 million into Laney Walker/Bethlehem like we are today. Augusta wasn't predicted to outperform the state of GA either 25 years ago like we will in 2010. Beverly Hills had shops who close down 20-25 years ago. But they still continue to build more shops.

disssman
6
Points
disssman 02/08/10 - 08:40 am
0
0
Countyman I questioned Fred a

Countyman I questioned Fred a few years ago about building the new jail. supposedly the jail "had" to be built near the court house. I then asked why they were going to phinizy road and a look of confusion was apparent. The reason I asked the question was I wanted to know why it wasn't being built on the county line where property was cheap. In fact they built both facilities in opposite directions from each other with no visible reason.

jb1234
0
Points
jb1234 02/08/10 - 09:37 am
0
0
crackerjack, the reason Port

crackerjack, the reason Port Royal failed was because it was way ahead of its time, plus, IMO, it has a flawed design since the only way to get to the shops part of it is from the riverwalk, it should have had street level entrances on Reynolds too. Anyway, the reason why I support building a new ballpark is because it will actually be something us average people can use. The city's spending millions on 'revitalization' of a neighborhood that I don't live in (which is a total waste, the reason these places are so 'blighted' is because the people that live there don't care about their homes, just because they are poor doesn't mean they have to live in filth), they're spending millions on a TEE center that I will most likely never have a reason to go to, a hotel is being built downtown that I will never stay in, so why not spend some money on something that every citizen will be able to use, not just a specific group? The Laney Walker money will ONLY benefit those in Laney Walker, the TEE Center will ONLY benefit a few business people, how about just once the city build something that everyone will benefit from and be able to use.

Brad Owens
4098
Points
Brad Owens 02/08/10 - 10:25 am
0
0
countryman, just because

countryman, just because someone starts a project doesn't mean it is going to sell. Now, I can tell you for certian that there was no growth between 1990 and 2000. The census is only done every ten years so I guess you will eithe be proven right or wrong this year huh? I love Augusta but I hate its politics. Emerdan 100% correct about most all of this. Riverman1 is 100% correct about the cabal that controls 'public' funds in our city. And I would like to point out, as someone who has been coming dowtown since the mid-80's and someone who owned a business downtown from 1995 to 2007, that it is NOT these gazillion dollar projects that helped bring downtown back. It was Artisit Row and MainStreet's creation of First Friday, Coco Rubio who opened the Soul Bar in 1995, Mike Shepis who opened the Pizza Joint in 1995, The owners of Metro, Barry and Matt from Nacho Mama's and Blue Sky Kitchen, and then the families that stayed through it all like Steve Fishman at Sidney's, Mr. Prince, Mrs. Ruben, Jonny Findley at United Loan and Firearms. Bryan Halterman for all he's not, had vision. And all of these folks have one thing in common, they are NOT government. They are small business owners. My problem I have with all this spending, as RM1 pointed out, is that it ties up public major funds and causes excess debts for many years to come. Why can't we get see a 'Master Plan' that fixes all the crumbling infrastructure? Whay can't we fix what we have and let private business sort out the rest?

bettyboop
7
Points
bettyboop 02/08/10 - 11:01 am
0
0
We are talking about Augusta

We are talking about Augusta here...A city that can not run itself...Lying thief wannabe lawyer taking them for a ride...because they are afraid ... a procurement dept. that has cost the City hundreds of thousands because of a inept and shady Dept. head (who they are also afraid of)....tax monies stolen and no suspects...riverwalk in shambles... gang crime rampant.....citizens afraid to go downtown.....a disgraceful situation with the LEC... Golf Gardens gone...Fort Discovery gone...it boggles the mind that the same people are now entering another pipe dream into the scenerio..................this is not the City North Augusta should get into bed with.

reader54
130
Points
reader54 02/08/10 - 12:59 pm
0
0
High-end condos downtown? I

High-end condos downtown? I just don't see people scurrying about to purchase one. Slow down, clean it up and enjoy the open space. I agree with Brad's last post about the big projects not having the impact of the local businesses.

countyman
19100
Points
countyman 02/08/10 - 01:13 pm
0
0
Bettyboop whatever you bash

Bettyboop whatever you bash Augusta everyday on here. Who is afraid to go downtown? You probably are but that's on you. I live on Broad street and see people downtown walking everyday. Fort Discovery is still open and is only moving to Fort. Gordon. Augusta violent crime is lower than Savannah, Macon, Greenville, Athens, Charleston, Columbia, Chattanooga, Columbus etc.

Is gang crime rampant in North Augusta too then? Because the city certainly has gangs.

And North Augusta polic still haven't found the burglar who stole a $10,000 driver's license printer and laminator from the South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles office in North Augusta early Saturday morning.

I told you when you point the finger. Three fingers are pointed right back at you.

countyman
19100
Points
countyman 02/08/10 - 01:02 pm
0
0
Reader54. The whites building

Reader54. The whites building sold 12 or 17 condos when it first opened. Downtown lofts are at 96% occupancy in 2010. Young professionals want urban areas to live in.

disssman
6
Points
disssman 02/08/10 - 01:10 pm
0
0
HE!! Augusta isn't even fit

HE!! Augusta isn't even fit to sponsor a retreat for the commissioners so they are going to Athens? Surely there is some wholesome family fun places downtown to attract them, thats why we built the TEE there. Why do you need a retreat anyway? It is nothing but an expensive "I'am OK you are OK meeting anyway" I say stay here and spend the time looking at the City code that hasn't been updated for years and that most of the commissioners haven't read anyway. What we don't need is another bondoggle at taxpayers expense with no stated purpose and no minutes of what was discussed.

disssman
6
Points
disssman 02/08/10 - 01:17 pm
0
0
JB1234. I have numerous

JB1234. I have numerous times what exactly are the boundries for the Laney Walker project and the Bethlehem area. Apparently there are no such things so when a "stakeholder" mentions the areas what are they talking about exactly? But I agree with your idea about spending my money on projects that benefit me and my family.

disssman
6
Points
disssman 02/08/10 - 01:22 pm
0
0
countyman. In reference to

countyman. In reference to your 5:55 just how many of those projects you outlined were in fact owned ny the taxpayers and how many were private properties that were renovated compliments of the taxpayer and without their approval? Get your head out of the clay and look around at what you are paying for but have absolutely no say about. P.S. just follow th money trail of each of the properties you outlined and you will see the same old "stakeholders" are involved.

Emerydan
10
Points
Emerydan 02/08/10 - 01:27 pm
0
0
Countyman should buy stock in

Countyman should buy stock in Koolaid, because he sure drinks a lot of it.

fall guy
0
Points
fall guy 02/08/10 - 01:31 pm
0
0
My husband is a firefighter.

My husband is a firefighter. No, not the one pictured. Firefighters do have down times after they've fought fire, cleaned the truck, cleaned the station, trained, checked out all equipment, etc. You would really begrudge him swinging the golf club next to the station? The officer in question is a fine young man and one of the hardest working young people I have ever known. Are you employed? If so, have you never taken a coffee break, checked your personal email, taken or made a personal call...or were all 8 of your hours spent focused specifically on your work tasks? These men and women work 24 hours at a time and believe me, at a working station such as the one in this story, these folks rarely get a full night's sleep or a meal that's not interrupted by a medical or fire call. Please be grateful for what these public servants do and not nitpick every moment that they spend at work. You certainly don't want to do their jobs.

seenitB4
81170
Points
seenitB4 02/08/10 - 01:38 pm
0
0
FALLGUY,,, Since I lived part

FALLGUY,,, Since I lived part of my life with a fire chief, I certainly know what you're saying is true..Besides that they are very much under paid for what they do. Some just love the work.. Thank goodness they do.

dani
12
Points
dani 02/08/10 - 02:50 pm
0
0
The baseball as pictured

The baseball as pictured would be a grand acquisition for our area. This is the one idea that I would like to see followed through on - but the timing is wrong. The sorry state of the economy and the desparate need for other much needed projects should overshadow any grandiose ideas such as the ballpark for now.

dani
12
Points
dani 02/08/10 - 02:59 pm
0
0
For those who continue to

For those who continue to bash Richmond County but drive miles to spend the money that (if earned) was probably earned in Richmond County. Spend those dollars with local merchants and you will begin to see a difference. If you can't help - then for goodness sakes don't hurt. Where do you place your loyalty...or is that a foreign word. And please, stop bragging that you are doing your shopping in other venues, it is not "cute".

emergencyfan
0
Points
emergencyfan 02/08/10 - 04:10 pm
0
0
I have a few

I have a few questions...

What happens to the old stadium? Does it just rot and grow weeds or is there a plan to reuse the space?

If the population of Richmond County is increasing, why has the student enrollment in Richmond County schools been decreasing each year for the past four years?

Back to Top

Search Augusta jobs