Archers go first in public hunts of deer in Lincoln County

Muzzleloader and archery hunters are invited to participate in primitive weapon deer hunts at Bussey Point Management Area located in Lincoln County, Ga., this fall, beginning with archery-only hunts Friday-Saturday and Oct. 14.

 

The public hunts at the 2,545-acre peninsula at Thurmond Lake are managed by the Army Corps of Engineers as part of ongoing efforts to maintain carrying capacity and improve the quality of the herd.

In addition to the archery hunts, muzzleloader hunts will be held Oct. 15 and Nov. 11-12.

Hunters may arrive one hour before sunrise and will be checked through the check station located at the entrance gate. Hunting will conclude one hour after sundown.

The bag limit is two does and one quality buck each day of each hunt. Quality bucks are those with racks having four points or better on at least one side, or a 15-inch or greater outside spread.

Muzzleloader hunts are limited to 100 hunters per day. The muzzleloader hunters will be registered on a first-come, first-served basis. Archery hunters are invited to participate in all scheduled hunts.

Hunters must be licensed in accordance with existing Georgia regulations, but a state Wildlife Management Area (WMA) license is not required for these hunts.

For more information, contact Ken Boyd at the J. Strom Thurmond Office at (800) 533-3478, ext. 1159, or (864) 333-1159.

 

PRESCRIBED BURNING BENEFITS: The Georgia Prescribed Fire Council will offer a series of educational programs for landowners and wildlife managers during its annual meeting Sept. 29 in Tifton, Ga.

Prescribed fire involves applying the natural process of fire in a safe way to ensure ecosystem health and reduce the risk of wildfire. Also called controlled burning, prescribed fire is one of the most effective, efficient and economical ways to manage Georgia’s forest lands and ecosystems.

Experts will cover a range of fire topics during sessions from8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Registration for the meeting is $30 per person. Students can register for $10 with their student identification. To reserve a spot for lunch, pre-registration is required by Sept. 15.

Learn more about the meeting, pre-registration and the Georgia Prescribed Fire Council at www.garxfire.com/events.htm.

 

SHRIMP BAITING: South Carolina’s popular 60-day shrimp baiting season opened Friday and extends through Nov. 8, with biologists forecasting unusually high shrimp numbers following a warm winter and strong breeding of white shrimp in coastal waters last fall.

“This will be good news for both the commercial fleet who work in our nearshore waters as well as the recreational shrimping community fishing in shallower estuarine waters,” said Mel Bell, director of S.C. DNR’s Office of Fisheries Management. “If all of the current trends hold this could be a very good year for shrimping in South Carolina.’

Resident shrimp-baiting licenses cost $25, and non-resident licenses cost $500. Licenses may be applied for online (dnrlicensing.sc.gov/) or by phone (866) 714-3611.The catch limit is 48 quarts of shrimp measured heads-on (or 29 quarts heads-off) per boat or set of poles per day, and each boat is limited to a set of 10 poles.

 

THURMOND CLEANUP: Volunteers are needed for the annual Thurmond Lake cleanup campaign on National Public Lands Day, on Sept. 24.

Projects include debris cleanup, brush clearing, and trail and park maintenance along the shoreline, islands, recreation areas, coves, old road ends and bridge areas. Scouting groups, civic organizations, sports clubs, church groups, businesses, families and individuals can participate.

Participants are asked to RSVP by Sept. 12. For more information, contact the Thurmond Project Office toll free at 800-533-3478, extension 1129.

The community cleanup and picnic for National Public Lands Day on Sept. 24 will be from 8 a.m. to noon. The check-in location is the Below Dam South Carolina Recreation Area group shelter at 384 Power Plant Road, Clarks Hill, South Carolina 29821. All volunteers should wear closed-toed shoes, long pants and bring plenty of water. Volunteers should plan to arrive a few minutes early for check-in and a safety briefing.

 

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