From the Archives: Pendleton King Park (1970-2015)

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Totem pole at Pendleton King Park, July 12, 1970.

by: File/Staff

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This 142-ton Class F Mikado steam locomotive was donated to the city of Augusta in 1952 by the Georgia Railroad & Banking Company. It was displayed at Pendleton King Park for many years, then moved to the Augusta museum. Photo taken at Pendleton King Park, December 1, 1981.

by: File/Staff

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A fox lays in an animal enclosure at Pendleton King Park, September 1, 1990.

by: File/Staff

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This enclosure at Pendleton King Park houses various animals, including deer and goats, September 1, 1990.

by: File/Staff

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The "Touch and Smell" garden at Pendleton King Park, July, 31, 2000.

by: File/Staff

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Flowers at the "Touch and Smell" garden at Pendleton King Park, July 31, 2000.

by: File/Staff

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Anne Huff, front, reads a story to Patsy May, left, and her granddaughters Carly, 5 and Caitlin May, 8, all from North Augusta during story time at Pendleton King Park, June 12, 2003.

by: File/Staff

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Allison Daley, of Augusta, finds a quiet place at Pendleton King Park to read the paper and enjoy the sun as her children play, Monday, April 5, 2004.

by: File/Staff

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Master Gardener Fey Hardy, of Augusta, digs a hole to plant hydrangeas along with other gardeners and volunteers at Pendleton King Park on Tuesday, June 1, 2004. The workers were planting over 200 hydrangeas of over 60 different varieties in preparation for the Hydrangea Festival.

by: File/Staff

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Master Gardener Mary Crace, of Augusta, waters several hydrangeas at Pendleton King Park on Tuesday, June 1, 2004. The workers were planting over 200 hydrangeas of over 60 different varieties in preparation for the Hydrangea Festival.

by: File/Staff

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Children play on an old Army tank at Pendleton King Park Saturday afternoon June 11, 2005.

by: File/Staff

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Visitors gather inside the Touch and Smell Garden at Pendleton King Park on Tuesday afternoon, November 8, 2005. The Touch and Smell garden was dedicated to Eugenia S. Lehmann and a plaque placed at the entrance.

by: File/Staff

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Roxxie Blanton sells red amaryllis stems at the plant swap and sale at Pendleton King Park Saturday, May 6, 2006.

by: File/Staff

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From left, Fisher Stevenson, 3, Louis Stevenson, 10, and McCall Stevenson, 7, play on new playground equipment at Pendleton King Park on November 17, 2006.

by: File/Staff

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Tim Varghese, left, and Ashley Hill both of Augusta enjoy a picnic together at Pendleton King Park on Monday, September 3, 2007.

by: File/Staff

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Gardens at Pendleton King Park on April 9, 2008.

by: File/Staff

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There are a series of gardens at Pendleton King Park for visitors to wander through on April 9, 2008.

by: File/Staff

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Kun Xie tries to fly a kite at Pendleton King Park on April 10, 2008.

by: File/Staff

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Megan Kluzynski, 5, swings with a push from her grandfather Thomas Kluzynski at Pendleton King Park in Augusta, April 23, 2008. Megan is blind and enjoys swinging and listening to the geese at the park.

by: File/Staff

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A group of children plays with one of the outdoor musical instruments at Pendleton King Park, Wednesday April 30, 2008.

by: File/Staff

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Jamaree Lloyd, 4, plays peek-a-boo with his brother JaQuan Beaman, 9, not pictured, around a climbing wall at Pendleton King Park, Sunday, Sept. 7, 2008.

by: File/Staff

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Sandy Bowles walks to her car carrying her newly acquired plants Saturday, May 29, 2010 at Pendleton King Park in Augusta.

by: File/Staff

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Maura Lammers builds a fort with ice and snow at Pendleton King Park, Monday, January 10, 2011.

by: File/Staff

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Franke Pavilion at Pendleton King Park, 1600 Troupe St., Feb. 18. 2011.

by: File/Staff

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Volunteers work at Pendleton King Park in the dog park area where they lay concrete for a watering area Thursday, October 11, 2012. Steven Jenkins (right, foreground) levels the concrete with Stan Turner (center).

by: File/Staff

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Mary McMakin walks by Angel Trumpets during the Plant Swap at Pendleton King Park on Saturday, May 4, 2013.

by: File/Staff

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A woman walks by varieties of plants and flowers on display during the Plant Swap at Pendleton King Park on Saturday, May 4, 2013.

by: File/Staff

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Beau drinks water from a dish as Parker lays in a water tub at the Pendleton King Park dog park, Wednesday, June 12, 2013.

by: File/Staff

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Eight-year-old Clay Woods practices his duck call near a pond at Pendleton King Park on Monday, January 20, 2014.

by: File/Staff

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Andrew Vonplinski throws his second throw at the 4th hole on the disc golf course at Pendleton King Park, Monday, January 20, 2014.

by: File/Staff

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Pendleton King Park waterfall shown Tuesday September 9, 2014.

by: File/Staff

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Pendleton King Park Foundation members Derek Vanover, from left, and Jim Blount, along with Jack Blue with Environmental Life Plantings look at the new Pendleton King Park waterfall Tuesday September 9, 2014.

by: File/Staff

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Mary Ellen Smith (foreground) and Keturah Stewart, both from Dancing Dogs Yoga, lead a Baptiste-inspired Power Vinyasa Yoga class at Yoga in the Park at Pendleton King Park, Sunday, Sep. 21, 2014.

by: File/Staff

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Yoga in the Park at Pendleton King Park, Sunday, Sep. 21, 2014.

by: File/Staff

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Edward "Fast Eddie" Herman, right, throws a disc as Donald Pilcher, left, watches while they play disc golf at Pendleton King Park, August 20, 2015.

by: File/Staff

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Adam Toomey and his dog, Rousseau, at the Bark Park, a special park for dogs at Pendleton King Park, August 20, 2015.

by: File/Staff

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This 1954 M48 tank, weighing 45 tons, is on display at Pendleton King Park, August 20, 2015.

by: File/Staff

Description

Before it became a park in the 1960s, the land on Troupe Street was designated a bird sanctuary in memory of Pendleton King.
The land was part of a plantation originally owned by John Pendleton King, a judge and member of the U.S. Senate who aided in the development of the Georgia Railroad, the Georgia Railroad Bank, the Augusta Canal and King Mill.

When King bought the plantation from the Bugg family, it contained a three-story mansion, brick slave quarters, the Bugg family cemetery (still present today), stables and a pond.

When King died, his son, Henry Barclay King, inherited the estate. He and his wife, Elizabeth, had one son, John Pendleton King II – Pendleton, as he was called.

Pendleton served as an Army liaison officer in Paris during WW-I. In 1912, while he was away, the masion burned down. His parents moved to a Sand Hills cottage with the expectation that Pendleton would rebuild the house when he returned. But three weeks after he came home from the war, in 1919, he saved one of two women who were drowning in Lake Elizabeth (also still on the property). He was unable to save the second woman, but following the incident he became ill and died during a violent fit of coughing, likely of a brain aneurysm.

He was 29 years old, and his heartbroken parents never rebuilt the mansion. They willed 64 acres of the land to be used as a bird sanctuary in memory of their son, Pendleton King.

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