Today in History - June 4

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Archbishop Pericle Felici, right, of the Vatican Ceremonial Congregation, assisted by the Rev. Fantilume, gives the absolution over the body of Pope John XXIII in St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City on June 4, 1963. The body of the 81-year-old pontiff, who died on June 3, 1963, had been carried across St. Peter's Square from the Apostolic Palace for the lying in state before the Basilica's main altar. In the background, from left, are: Cardinals Francesco Morano, Arcadio Larraona Saralegui, Francesco Bracci, Augustin Bea, William Theodore Heard, Michael Browne, Joaquin Albareda, Valerio Valeri, partly obscured by Rev. Fantilume and Fernando Cento. (AP Photo)

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Miguel Vera, assistant security manager for ARCA air cargo company, points to the wheel well of the Colombian cargo jet at Miami International Airport, June 4, 1993, where Guillermo Rosales, a 13-year-old boy, stowed away. Rosales survived sub-zero temperatures and other hazards during the three hour flight. (AP Photo/Jose Nieves)

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Victor Mogollon, left, and Juan Carlos Mercado, mechanics for ARCA air cargo company, point up at the wheel well of the cargo jet at Miami International Airport, June 4, 1993, where 13-year-old Guillermo Rosales stowed away. Rosales survived sub-zero temperatures during the three-hour flight. (AP Photo/Jose Nieves)

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FILE - This June 4, 1943 black-and-white file photo shows a wounded U.S. Marine is given a plasma transfusion by nurse Mae Olson aboard an aerial evacuation unit, over Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. Women served and died on the nation’s battlefields from the first. They were nurses and cooks, spies and couriers in the Revolutionary War. Some disguised themselves as men to fight for the Union or the Confederacy. Yet the U.S. military’s official acceptance of women in combat took more than two centuries. New roles for females were doled out fitfully _ whenever commanders got in a bind and realized they needed women’s help. A look at milestones on the way to lifting the ban on women in ground combat. (AP Photo, File)

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Henry Ford is seen on the Quadricycle, the first automobile he ever built in Dearborn, Mich., 1896. (AP Photo)

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The heart of North America's system for warning of enemy attack is being buried deep in granite in Cheyenne Mountain, five miles from downtown Colorado Springs, Colo., shown June 4, 1964. This photo of part of the huge tunnel complex gives some idea of the size of the combat operations center being built for the North American Air Defense Command (NORAD). it is scheduled to start operations late in 1965. (AP Photo/EG)

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The Duke and Duchess of Windsor in a motor boat on one of the canals in Venice, Italy, June 4, 1937, smile at onlookers as they are taken to a hotel. The couple were married , June 3, at the Chateau De Cande, France. (AP Photo)

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A member of the media descends a 64 foot shaft into the 1,452 foot tunnel that Mexican drug agents discovered leading from Tijuana into the United States in Tijuana on June 4, 1993. (AP Photo/Joan Fahrenthold)

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In this photo taken on June 5, 1989 and made available for the first time by the AP on Thursday June 4, 2009, three unidentified men flee the scene, as a Chinese man, background left, stands alone to block a line of approaching tanks, background right, in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. The man in the background stood his ground and blocked the column of tanks when they came closer, an image captured on film by numerous other photographers and one that ultimately became a widely reproduced symbol of events there. The photograph was taken by then-AP reporter Terril Jones and came to light after online discussions of the incident coinciding with the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown. (AP Photo/Terril Jones)

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Brian Durwood, vice president of marketing for Virtual Vision, models a pair of Virtual Vision Sport virtual reality eyeglasses at the consumer electronics show in Chicago on Friday, June 4, 1993. Wearers see a big screen color television image that appears to float about 10 feet in front of them. The glasses also contain earphones that provide stereo sound. (AP Photo/Mark Elias)

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Demonstrators line up outside the Chinese Embassy in Washington on Sunday, June 4, 1989. Demonstrators were protesting the killing of students in China by government troops. (AP Photo/Marcy Nighwaner)

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Pres. Ronald Reagan, right, shown addressing the joint session of Parliament and is applauded by Tom FitzPatrick, left, Chairman of the Irish Parliament, Monday, June 4, 1984, Dublin, Ireland. (AP Photo/Lana Harris)

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Britain?s Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher talks with U.S. President Ronald Reagan as they walk in the garden of the American Ambassador?s residence in Paris, Friday, June 4, 1982. Both leaders are in France for the Summit to be held at the Palace of Versailles which begins with a opening session on Saturday. (AP Photo)

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Country and Western singer Nelson Willie performing on stage at the U.S. Festival, June 4, 1983 in Glen Helen Regional park in Devore, San Bernardino, California. (AP Photo/M. Tweed)

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Dr. Everest Koop, center, surgeon in chief of the children’s hospital of Philadelphia, USA, after having received on Wednesday the Legion of Honor, France’s highest medal for public service, honoring his pioneering work with newborn children and Siamese twins. Mrs. Everest Koop, next to him, attended the ceremony, held at the Hotel de Lissay in Paris, June 4, 1980, accompanied by Mrs. Donna Hartman, left, and Mr. Arthur Hartman, right, U.S. ambassador in France. (AP Photo/Taylor)

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Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev has a smiling greeting for U.S. President John Kennedy on the latter's arrival at the Soviet Embassy in Vienna June 4, 1961 for their second round of talks. At center in background is Soviet Forign Minister Andrei Gromyko. Secretary of State Dean Rusk has back to camera. (AP Photo)

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The nuclear reactor of the mockup portable power plant developed in Baltimore on June 4, 1956. It is all ready to operate with the addition of the “hot” nuclear fuel. The plant is ready to be sold, shipped by rail, water, air or truck road, and set up in any remote point. It is packaged in eight aluminum pods, the largest 9-by-9-by-30 feet. The whole plant could be set up and in operation in three or four days, according to the developers at the Glenn L. Martin Co. The reactor, with its fuel, would be sunk into the ground, ice, sand or other material on the spot. Such material would serve as a shield. The plant, suitable for use in any climate, will operate for 18 months without refueling, the manufacturer says. It could supply electricity for a city of 10,000. The power plant was designed for use in undeveloped areas where power and transportation coasts of conventional fuels are high. (AP Photo/William Smith)

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Between five and six thousand persons carry banners in an anti-Italian demonstration in the city of Ioannina in Epirus, northwestern Greece on June 4, 1960. Some of the signs say: “Epirus, Greece” and “Sicily, we think is Greek." The demonstrations were sparked by a report submitted to NATO by the Italian general staff which stated that parts of Epirus ethnologically were Albanian. The report caused widespread indignation throughout Greece and the Greek government vigorously demanded the withdrawal of the document. Italy later expressed its regret and withdrew the document. (AP Photo)

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Roy Cohn, chief counsel of the McCarthy subcommittee, sits in the witness chair and fingers his necktie as he faces more questioning in the McCarthy-Army hearing in its 27th day in Washington on June 4, 1954. His testimony was interrupted during the morning session by a lengthy discussion of monitored phone calls. (AP Photo)

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FILE - In this June 1942 file photo, a Mogami class Japanese cruiser is the flaming target of carrier-based U.S. naval aircraft in the historic battle of Midway which raged for three days in June 1942. On Monday, June 4, 2012, the Navy marks the 70th anniversary of a battle that turned the tide of World War II. (AP Photo, file)

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Latest device to aid civilians in detecting and identifying various types of poison gas is the “Sniff Kit” containing five harmless gases with the characteristic odors of common war gases. Here’s Carol Kent, air raid warden in the Central Park section of New York City, getting a smell of tear gas June 4, 1942. Approved by Col. Walter P. Burn of the Chemical Warfare Service, the kits will not be sold generally but will be available for defense training classes and similar groups. (AP Photo/Tom Fitzsimmons))

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A symphony orchestra, sixty strong, formed in the Western Command, gave its first performance in Chester Cathedral. The Western Command Symphony Orchestra playing in Chester Cathedral in Chester, June 4, 1942. (AP Photo)

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Pilots of the American Volunteer Group the “Flying Tigers”are ready for another scrap with the Japanese somewhere in China June 4, 1942 as one of their typical shark-painted planes looms above them. Left to right are: (front row) C.R. Bond, G.L. Pakton, P. Wright, J.V. Newkirk, D.L. Hill, J.G. Bright, and E.S. Conant; (rear row) R.B. Keeton, F. Lawlor, F.I. Ricketts, R.F. Layher, H.M. Geselbracht, T.A. Jones, F. Schiel. (AP Photo/Chungking)

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Jubilant scenes were witnessed at a wayside railway station when French troops, who had so gallantly fought their way out of Dunkirk, halted during their journey from the coast after their safe arrival in England on June 4, 1940. Amazing scene as Covent Garden farmers distributed large quantities of fruit, for which they had collected between themselves, among the cheerful French Soldiers. (AP Photo)

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A seething, but surprisingly orderly mass of steel hats, as more and still more thousands more of the B.E.F. return to England, June 1, 1940. (AP Photo)

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A tin can, clothes pin and some chemically-treated absorbent material make up this home-made gas mask designed and worn by Vernon A. Bowers, a chemist in Baltimore, June 4, 1942. Bowers says the entire mask cost him only about 10 cents. The clothes pin keeps the nose closed while Bowers inhales air through his mouth. The can is filled with chemically-treated materials which filter out gas. (AP Photo)

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Egyptian President Anwar al-Sadat is seen as he peers through a telescope during a visit at the frontlines to Israel, at Sinai Peninsula, on June 4, 1973. (AP Photo)

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One of the by-products of the atomic age is the radioactive material which remains as a waste product, much like the ash of a coal furnace. Right now, the nation has a 60 million gallon atomic cesspool and there’s strong prospect that it may double in 10 years. So scientists are working on ways to bury or otherwise get rid of this waste material, some of which can be very harmful and dangerous. One idea is to bury it in Kansas salt mines. An Oak Ridge (Tenn.) National Laboratory researcher, E.G. Struxness, measures results of an experiment conducted on rock salt on June 4, 1959. (AP Photo)

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By the light of a kerosene lamp, 14-year-old Henrietta Hilton studies in her tenant farm home in Summerton, S.C., on June 4, 1954. She is in the ninth grade. Discussing the Supreme Court decision against school segregation, Henrietta says: “I’d like to go to school with white children... I think I’d enjoy being friends with some white girls. Maybe they’d enjoy being friends with me.” (AP Photo/Rudolph Faircloth)

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The creation is the latest in anti-radiation suits used by laboratory and industrial workers to protect them from dangerous gases and radioactive particles shown June 4, 1956. Made of Goodyear vinyl film, the one-piece suit is air conditioned for worker comfort. The Martian-like outfit is inflated to the proper pressure with compressed air. Tough and pliable, the garment has won the approval of the Atomic Energy Commission and is highly resistant to ripping and puncture. Scientists togged in this suit and equipped with a Geiger counter can detect radioactive particles floating in the air with no danger of contamination. (AP Photo)

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Henrietta Hilton, front left, daughter of tenant farmer William Hilton, and her fellow students, are seen in their ninth grade classroom in Summerton, S.C., June 4, 1954. The classroom is in a newly built brick building that adjoins to the old wooden structure, which is the center of a controversy which led to one of four cases involving "separate but equal" facilities for blacks and whites. Others are not identified. (AP Photo/Rudolph Faircloth)

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U.S. soldiers enter compound 96 as teargas smoke fills the area somewhere in Korea, June 4, 1952. (AP Photo/Fred Waters)

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Glen K. Ecker, of Pasadena, holds a soapdish-size radio he built, showing the covered chassis and the "works" in Pasadena, California June 4, 1953. The tiny set which is used with earphones, receives both long and short waves through Ecker's patented wiring scheme, combined with high fidelity hearing aid equipment. The radio uses a standard hearing aid tube coupled to a sub-miniature tuning condenser and is powered by a 30-volt B battery from a hearing aid, and a one-and-a-half volt A penlight cell. (AP Photo)

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Actor Tony Curtis carries his bride, actress Janet Leigh, into their honeymoon suite at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City, June 4, 1951. The couple were married earlier in Greenwich, Connecticut. (AP Photo)

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A U.S. immigration border patrolman, right, checks the papers of two passengers seeking to debark from the Polish liner Batory in New York, June 4, 1949. The Batory, on which Communist Gerhart Eisler made his escape from the United States, was boarded by numerous goverment agents as it reached New York on its return voyage from Europe. A U.S. government official said that the vessel "may be in the process of being seized." (AP Photo)

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Marine Lt. Col. E.R. Hagenah, second from left, presents a bronze statue modeled after Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal's picture of Marines raising the American flag on Mount Suribachi in Iwo Jima, to President Harry Truman, left, at the White House, June 4, 1945. Rosenthal is second from right and Felix Deweldon, sculpture of the statue, is at right. (AP Photo/Robert Clover)

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This general view shows U.S. Route 19 winding through the Appalachian Mountains in West Virginia on June 4, 1949. (AP Photo)

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Crewmen aboard the USS Yorktown battle fire after the carrier was hit by Japanese bombs, during the Battle of Midway, on June 4, 1942. Later the vessel had to be abandoned and was sunk by a Japanese submarine torpedo hit. (AP Photo)

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Miles of barded wire, which the British said would be used for Singapore defense, was piled high on the dock at Singapore on June 4, 1941. Authorities said it has been shipped around the Cape of Good Hope because of German air and sea raiders. (AP Photo/McDaniel)

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Black smoke rises from a burning U.S oil tank, set afire during a Japanese air raid on Midway Atoll, on September 8, 1942. (AP Photo)

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Princess Tsahia, Princess Tsehai Haile Selassie, left, with her father Haile Selassie I exiled Emperor of Abyssinia, Emperor of Ethiopia, being shown around the garden of their residence at Prince's Gate, London by Dr. Martin, the Abyssinian Minister, right, on June 4, 1936. (AP Photo/Staff/Putnam)

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Allied troops wait on the beach of Dunkirk for the rescue ships to take them to England, on June 4, 1940. Over three houndred thousand soldiers from Belgium, France and England were cut off from retreat on land by the German invasion and had to be evacuated in a heroic emergency sealift code-named Operation Dynamo. (AP Photo)

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Roald Amundsen toasts Capt.George Wilkins, the Australian explorer, on his successful flight over the North Pole regions June 4, 1928. (AP Photo)

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A group of the New York bonus marchers gather in the yards of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in Jersey City, N.J., in an effort to commandeer a train for Washington, June 4, 1932. Later they were taken on a train and then unloaded at Newark, New Jersey. (AP Photo)

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Great Russian ballet dancer Anna Pavlova dancing in June 4, 1921. (AP Photo)

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