Today in History - May 6

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President Clinton greets actress Sophia Loren on the receiving line of the official dinner honoring the Italian prime minister at the White House Wednesday, May 6, 1998.(AP Photo/Ruth Fremson)

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An unidentified woman is helped through floodwaters by Civil Defense volunteers after she left her home which was destroyed by rains attributed to El Nino, in Ecuador's Manabi province, approximatly 124 miles (200 kms) north of Guayaquil, Wednesday May 6, 1998. According to Ecuadorean officials flooding and heavy rains attributed to the El Nino weather phenomenon have caused the over 200 deaths and left over 30,000 people homeless. (AP Photo/Mauro Andino).

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Zairian villagers watch as Hutu refugees are evacuated by train from the Biaro refugee camp south of Kisangani Tuesday, May 6, 1997. Tuesday the train evacuations began anew following Sunday's overcrowding accident in which 91 refugees were killed.(AP Photo/John Moore)

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Armenians speak to a Soviet militia in Moscow, Sunday May 6, 1991 regarding the situation of Armenians in the Republic of Azerbaijan. Tensions increased on Sunday along the Armenian-Azerbaijani border after Soviet troops were airlifted into the region, where 36 people have died in ethnic clashes, Soviet media reported. (AP Photo/Peter Andrews)

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A colorful painted warrior shown at Mass, Sunday, May 6, 1984, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Pope John Paul II arrived for a three day stay, Monday, May 7, 1984. The man is unidentified. (AP Photo/Jeff Widener)

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Singer Diana Ross shown getting star in Hollywood?s ?Walk of Fame? May 6, 1982. (AP Photo)

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The Pope John Paul II arrives in Nairobi, Kenya, and celebrates a mass on May 6, 1980. (AP Photo/Gianni Foggia and Claudio Luffoli)

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Demonstrators protest the death of Bobby Sands at a Lisbon, Portugal on May 6, 1981 march on the British Embassy. (AP Photo/Rebelo)

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American Actor Robert Redford at the Cannes film festivals before their presentation of their film ?Jeremiah Johnson? May 6, 1972. (AP Photo/Levy)

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Flames and smoke billow from a sound stage at Samuel Goldwyn movie studio in Hollywood, California on May 6, 1974. Several explosions rocked the stage, where such films as “Guys and Dolls,” “West Side Story,” and “The Best Years of Our Lives” were made. (AP Photo)

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Young people flee riot gas as antiwar protesters continued their confrontations with authorities, National Guardsmen, foreground, and Madison police, background, near the University of Wisconsin campus at Madison, Wisconsin on May 6, 1970. Riot gas was widely used and could be felt in many parts of the city. (AP Photo/Paul Shane)

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Mrs. Lonnie Holley, left, her 7-year-old daughter Janalee and Mrs. Benjamin T. Whitfield, dressed in Civil War costume, place a wreath below the grieving women in the center of the monument near Corinth, Miss., on May 6, 1957. This monument honoring the Confederate dead at Shiloh was built by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. (AP Photo/G)

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Police examine debris after an explosion blew one locker apart and damaged three other lockers in New York?s Grand Central Terminal on May 6, 1953. Police said the explosion may have been from a time bomb. Authorities said no one was hurt, although the blast occurred along the ramp from the main to the commuter level of the station while crowds of commuters were on their way home. (AP Photo/John Rooney)

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FILE - In this May 6, 1954 file photo, Britain's Roger Bannister hits the tape to break the four-minute mile in Oxford, England. Roger Bannister remembers the four minute four-lap race on a cinder track in Oxford in 1954 that still stands as a transcendent moment in sports as if they were yesterday, still as vivid in his mind today as that afternoon more than half a century ago. (AP Photo/File)

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The Flying Wallendas perform on bicycles on a high wire, May 6, 1942. (AP Photo)

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Two of the famous Dagenham girl pipers Peggy Iris, left, and Margaret Fraser from the ENSA show Globe Trotters. They volunteered to come abroad and pipe to the men of the fighting forces. They have just returned from a tour of the western desert. The Sphinx hears the sound of the pipes as Peggy Iris and Margaret Fraser play in the desert, in Egypt, on May 6, 1943. (AP Photo)

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Members of a Canadian motorcycle detachment ride single file down a hill during training manoeuvers, somewhere in England, May 6, 1941. (AP Photo)

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Il Duce is so often the Iron Dictator in public that it was pleasant to see him as a family man with his daughter Edda married to Count Ciano, the Italian Foreign Minister and his two grandchildren, watching the riding competition. Benito Mussolini with Countess Ciano, his daughter, right, and his two grandchildren, Fabrizio, right, and Maria, at the International Horse Show in Rome on May 6, 1939. (AP Photo)

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This photo provided by the Philadelphia Public Ledger, taken at almost the split second that the Hindenburg exploded, shows the 804-foot German zeppelin just before the second and third explosions sent the ship crashing to the earth over the Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Lakehurst, N.J., on May 6, 1937. The roaring flames silhouette two men, at right atop the mooring mast, dangerously close to the explosions. (AP Photo/Philadelphia Public Ledger)

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The German dirigible Hindenburg crashes to earth, tail first, in flaming ruins after exploding on May 6, 1937, at the U.S. Naval Station in Lakehurst, N.J. The 1920s and 1930s were the golden age of dirigibles which crossed the Atlantic Ocean in about three days -- faster than a ship. The Hindenburg was the largest airship ever built at 804 feet long and flew up to 85 miles per hour while held aloft by hydrogen, which was highly flammable. The disaster, which killed 36 people after a 60-hour transatlantic flight from Germany, ended regular passenger service by the lighter-than-air airships. (AP Photo/Murray Becker)

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The German zeppelin Hindenburg flies over Manhattan on May 6, 1937. A few hours later, the ship burst into flames in an attempt to land at Lakehurst, N.J. (AP Photo)

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The Hindenburg zeppelin hits the ground after an explosion in mid-air destroyed the hydrogen-inflated German airship over Lakehurst, N.J., on May 6, 1937. The crew was preparing to land at the U.S. Naval base station when the explosion occured. Thirty six of the 97 persons on board were killed. (AP Photo/Murray Becker)

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Shown are ruins on anniversary of the earthquake, which destroyed the Friuli region of Italy last year. May 6, 1977 photo. (AP Photo)

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Melba King of Seattle, Wash., who is blind, gets an affectionate kiss from her new guide dog after a training session at the Guide Dogs for the Blind at San Francisco, Calif. May 6, 1952. The tiny Eskimo woman, blind since birth, lost her former guide dog after it was hit by an auto in Seattle. The new seeing eye dog was provided through the generosity of Seattle residents. (AP Photo/Ernest K. Bennett)

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Air mail usually is trucked to the airport for dispatch, but a three-place helicopter calls at the Post Office department in Washington on May 5, 1950 to do the job. With the package is E.J. Devore, President, Washington Air Derby association. Pilot is A.R. Bridgford, Worcester, Mass. Washington monument is in background. Odd curvature in rotor blades is produced by relatively shower camera speed failing to stop their motion. The stunt publicized an air derby show on May 6 at Alexandria, Va. (AP Photo/HB)

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Because of the intense cold the inhabitants of town on the Japan Sea wrap up everything but their eyeballs. A typical sight along the waterfront is these bundled up female stevedores who unload the catch from the fishing fleet, May 6, 1947. (AP Photo/Charles Gorry)

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Conn McCreary sits astride Pensive in the winner's circle in Louisville, May 6, 1945 after riding Owner Warren Wright?s Derby to victory in the richest derby in history. Left is Trainer Ben Jones and holding horse is Owner Wright of Chicago. (AP Photo)

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Four Chinese New Yorkers, answering the call for laborers to produce food required by the war effort, cultivate spinach on a farm near Albany, N.Y., May 6, 1943. Left to right: Hon Ying, Chen Ah Sue, Sing Ah Jang, and Wong Ah Sei. All were farmers in their native land. (AP Photo)

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R.A.F. men are getting into trim for Empire Air Day on Saturday, May 28, 1938. Formation flying and picking up messages from the ground while flying at speed, are features of the preliminary work of the no. 13, army co-operation squadron of the Royal Air force, stationed at Odiham, Hants. View of Hector machines of the no. 13 (A.C.) squadron in formation flight over Odiham, Hampshire, England, on May 6, 1938, in rehearsal for Empire Air Day on May 28, 1938. The quaint patterns created by trees and hedges are clearly visible in this picture. (AP Photo/Ray Illingworth)

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These photographs are the first official record so of aerial combats on May 6, 1940. They were taken by the camera-guns fitted to Hurricanes and Spitfires. These cameras, which are loaded with 16 mm. film, are fitted in the wings alongside the guns and automatically register a record as the pilot puts his guns into action. When firing ceases, the picture ceases. Every time a picture is taken, therefore, the British fighter is actually firing at an enemy aircraft. If the records sometimes lack clarity due to cloud condensation on the lens, vibration and fumes from the exhaust of aircraft being attacked, they nevertheless provide certain evidence of the concentrated gunfire brought to bear by an eight-gun British fighter, the fire power of which is greater than that of the entire machine-gun strength of a 1914 brigade of infantry. These pictures have been enlarged from the cinematic records of several recent combat. The remarkable effect of the first bursts on a Messerschmitt 110. Both engines are on fire. The port engine is bursting into flames. The curling white streak marks the path of a tracer bullet. (AP Photo)

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The Hindenburg zeppelin burns after it exploded during the docking procedure at Lakehurst Naval Air Station, N.J., on May 6, 1937. The hydrogen inflated dirigible burst into flames, killing 36 of the 97 persons on board. (AP Photo)

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The German dirigible Hindenburg crashes to earth, tail first, in flaming ruins after exploding on May 6, 1937, at the U.S. Naval Station in Lakehurst, N.J. The 1920s and 1930s were the golden age of dirigibles which crossed the Atlantic Ocean in about three days -- faster than a ship. The Hindenburg was the largest airship ever built at 804 feet long and flew up to 85 miles per hour while held aloft by hydrogen, which was highly flammable. The disaster, which killed 36 people after a 60-hour transatlantic flight from Germany, ended regular passenger service by the lighter-than-air airships. (AP Photo/Murray Becker)

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The German dirigible Hindenburg floats over New York City on the afternoon of May 6, 1937 as it heads for Lakehurst, N.J. to complete the 21st crossing from Germany to the United States. Later in the evening, the airship burst into flames when attempting to land. (AP Photo)

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