Slideshow: New evidence on Hunley

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The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley is raised from a barge by crane Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2000, at the former Charleston Naval Base in North Charleston, S.C. The Hunley, which sank with its crew of nine on Feb. 17, 1864 after blowing up the Union blockade ship Housatonic with a charge of black powder, was lifted from its watery grave about four miles off nearby Sullivans Island, secured on a barge and transported to a conservation lab at the old base. (AP PhotoPaula Illingworth)
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ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS OF FEB 24-25 -- FILE--The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley is raised from the ocean, Aug. 8, 2000, off the coast of Charleston, S.C. The Hunley has since rested in a tank of cold water at the former Charleston Navy base. Scientists hope to discover why the Hunley sank with its nine-man crew minutes after sending the Union blockade ship USS Housatonic to the bottom off Sullivans Island in 1864. (AP PhotoLou Krasky)
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The Confederate submarine Hunley, the first submarine to sink an enemy warship, is raised from the ocean off Charleston, S.C., as VIP's watch from a boat watch Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2000. The Hunley sank in 1864. (AP PhotoLou Krasky)
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Carl Berenholtz, CDR with the Maryland division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, foreground, carries a Civil War era flag Sunday, March 28, 2004, during memorial services at Hartzler Funeral Home in Libertytown, Md., for Seaman Joseph Ridgaway. Ridgaway was one of eight sailors on the submarine H.L. Hunley, when it sank in waters off the coast of South Carolina Feb. 17, 1864. Buried services for all eight of the Hunley sailors will take place in Charleston, S.C., on April 17. (AP PhotoTimothy Jacobsen)
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**ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, APRIL 11** This March 17, 2004, photo shows the plot where the eight crewman of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley will be buried at the Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, S.C., during a ceremony, Saturday, April 17, 2004. They will be buried in the clear area to the left with Lt. George Dixon being the closest to camera view. As many as 10,000 people, including 6,000 Civil War re-enacors from as far away as Europe, will march in a somber funeral procession for the crew of the H.L. Hunley, the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. (AP PhotoLou krasky)
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Capt. David Riden, a member of the Maryland Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, stands guard over a coffin containing sediment from the H.L. Hunley, a Civil War era submarine that went down in 1863 in waters of Chalrestown, S.C., during a memorial service for Seaman Joseph Ridgaway Sunday, March 28, 2004, in Libertytown, Md. Looking at artifacts from the Hunley and paying their respects are Walter Valentini, second from right, and Jeff Madeja. (AP PhotoTimothy Jacobsen)
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A facial reconstruction of George Dixon, commander of the H.L. Hunley, is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Monday, April 12, 2004. Dixon was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (AP PhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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A facial reconstruction of a Hunley crewman identified only by the last name Lumpkin or Lumpkins is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Tuesday, April 13, 2004. He was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (AP PhotoFriends ofthe Hunley)
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A facial reconstruction of Joseph Ridgaway, the second-in-command of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Tuesday, April 13, 2004. Ridgaway was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (APPhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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**FILE** These photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Monday, April 12, 2004, show a facial reconstruction of H.L. Hunley crew member Arnold Becker. Becker was born in Germany and served on the famed Confederate ironclad C.S.S Arkansas before meeting his fate when the H.L. Hunley sank off Charleston in 1864. Although little was known about Becker when the Hunley crew was buried in 2004, two more years of research and a Confederate surgeon's journal have helped fill in the gaps in his life. (AP PhotoFriends of the Hunley, File) ** NO SALES**
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A reconstruction of the face of Hunley crewman James Wicks is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Thursday, April 15, 2004. Wicks was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (AP PhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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A reconstruction of the face of Hunley crewman Frank Collins is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Wednesday, April 14, 2004. Collins was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (APPhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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A reconstruction of the face of Hunley crewman J.F. Carlsen is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Thursday, April 15, 2004. Carlsen was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (AP PhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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Flags adorn the grave of Confederate Lt. George Dixon, the commander of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley in Charleston, S.C., on Friday, Feb. 17, 2012. The Hunley, which sank 148 years ago Friday, was the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. (AP PhotoBruce Smith).
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Spectators gather around the grave containing the eight caskets of the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley Saturday, April 17, 2004, in Charleston, S.C. Thousands of men in Confederate gray and Union blue and women in black hoop skirts and veils escorted the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship, to their final resting place Saturday. The hand-cranked Hunley made history on Feb. 17, 1864, when it rammed a spar with a black powder charge into the Union blockade ship Housatonic. (AP PhotoAlan Hawes, Pool)
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Paul Mardikian, the senior conservator on the H.L. Hunley project, points to the clear lens from the lantern from the Confederate submarine in a lab in North Charleston, S.C., on Thursday, April 19, 2012. In back is an X-ray image of what the lantern, found aboard the sub that was the first in history to sink an enemy warship, looked like after the sub was raised 12 years ago. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
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The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sits in its slings on Friday, June 24, 2011 at a conservation lab in North Charleston, S.C.. The Hunley, the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship, was rotated upright this week for the first time since it sank with its crew of eight in 1864 The hole at the lower right is on a side of the sub not seen in almost 150 years. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
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The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sits in a conservation tank after a steel truss that had surrounded it was removed on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012 at a conservation lab in North Charleston, S.C. Scientists say removing the truss allows the first clear view of the sub since it sank in 1864 off the South Carolina coast. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
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The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sits in a conservation tank after a steel truss that had surrounded it was removed on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012 at a conservation lab in North Charleston, S.C. Scientists say removing the truss allows the first clear view of the sub since it sank in 1864 off the South Carolina coast. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
20 of 27
Confederate re-enactors and members of the Portsmouth Submariners Association of Portsmouth, United Kingdom, stand at attention at the graveside of the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley in Charleston, S.C., on Friday, Feb. 17, 2012. A member of the association earlier placed a poppy wreath at the gravesite as British submariners paid tribute to the crew of the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
21 of 27
The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley is raised from a barge by crane Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2000, at the former Charleston Naval Base in North Charleston, S.C. The Hunley, which sank with its crew of nine on Feb. 17, 1864 after blowing up the Union blockade ship Housatonic with a charge of black powder, was lifted from its watery grave about four miles off nearby Sullivans Island, secured on a barge and transported to a conservation lab at the old base. (AP PhotoPaula Illingworth)
22 of 27
ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS OF FEB 24-25 -- FILE--The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley is raised from the ocean, Aug. 8, 2000, off the coast of Charleston, S.C. The Hunley has since rested in a tank of cold water at the former Charleston Navy base. Scientists hope to discover why the Hunley sank with its nine-man crew minutes after sending the Union blockade ship USS Housatonic to the bottom off Sullivans Island in 1864. (AP PhotoLou Krasky)
23 of 27
The Confederate submarine Hunley, the first submarine to sink an enemy warship, is raised from the ocean off Charleston, S.C., as VIP's watch from a boat watch Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2000. The Hunley sank in 1864. (AP PhotoLou Krasky)
24 of 27
Carl Berenholtz, CDR with the Maryland division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, foreground, carries a Civil War era flag Sunday, March 28, 2004, during memorial services at Hartzler Funeral Home in Libertytown, Md., for Seaman Joseph Ridgaway. Ridgaway was one of eight sailors on the submarine H.L. Hunley, when it sank in waters off the coast of South Carolina Feb. 17, 1864. Buried services for all eight of the Hunley sailors will take place in Charleston, S.C., on April 17. (AP PhotoTimothy Jacobsen)
25 of 27
**ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, APRIL 11** This March 17, 2004, photo shows the plot where the eight crewman of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley will be buried at the Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, S.C., during a ceremony, Saturday, April 17, 2004. They will be buried in the clear area to the left with Lt. George Dixon being the closest to camera view. As many as 10,000 people, including 6,000 Civil War re-enacors from as far away as Europe, will march in a somber funeral procession for the crew of the H.L. Hunley, the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. (AP PhotoLou krasky)
26 of 27
Capt. David Riden, a member of the Maryland Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, stands guard over a coffin containing sediment from the H.L. Hunley, a Civil War era submarine that went down in 1863 in waters of Chalrestown, S.C., during a memorial service for Seaman Joseph Ridgaway Sunday, March 28, 2004, in Libertytown, Md. Looking at artifacts from the Hunley and paying their respects are Walter Valentini, second from right, and Jeff Madeja. (AP PhotoTimothy Jacobsen)
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A facial reconstruction of George Dixon, commander of the H.L. Hunley, is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Monday, April 12, 2004. Dixon was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (AP PhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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A facial reconstruction of a Hunley crewman identified only by the last name Lumpkin or Lumpkins is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Tuesday, April 13, 2004. He was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (AP PhotoFriends ofthe Hunley)
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A facial reconstruction of Joseph Ridgaway, the second-in-command of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Tuesday, April 13, 2004. Ridgaway was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (APPhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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**FILE** These photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Monday, April 12, 2004, show a facial reconstruction of H.L. Hunley crew member Arnold Becker. Becker was born in Germany and served on the famed Confederate ironclad C.S.S Arkansas before meeting his fate when the H.L. Hunley sank off Charleston in 1864. Although little was known about Becker when the Hunley crew was buried in 2004, two more years of research and a Confederate surgeon's journal have helped fill in the gaps in his life. (AP PhotoFriends of the Hunley, File) ** NO SALES**
31 of 27
A reconstruction of the face of Hunley crewman James Wicks is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Thursday, April 15, 2004. Wicks was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (AP PhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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A reconstruction of the face of Hunley crewman Frank Collins is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Wednesday, April 14, 2004. Collins was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (APPhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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A reconstruction of the face of Hunley crewman J.F. Carlsen is shown in these photographs released by the Friends of the Hunley on Thursday, April 15, 2004. Carlsen was aboard the Hunley on Feb. 17, 1864, when it sank the Union blockade ship Housatonic, becoming the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Leading up to Saturday's funeral for the Hunley's crew, biographies and facial reconstructions of two crewmen were being released each day. (AP PhotoFriends of the Hunley)
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Flags adorn the grave of Confederate Lt. George Dixon, the commander of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley in Charleston, S.C., on Friday, Feb. 17, 2012. The Hunley, which sank 148 years ago Friday, was the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. (AP PhotoBruce Smith).
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Spectators gather around the grave containing the eight caskets of the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley Saturday, April 17, 2004, in Charleston, S.C. Thousands of men in Confederate gray and Union blue and women in black hoop skirts and veils escorted the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship, to their final resting place Saturday. The hand-cranked Hunley made history on Feb. 17, 1864, when it rammed a spar with a black powder charge into the Union blockade ship Housatonic. (AP PhotoAlan Hawes, Pool)
36 of 27
Paul Mardikian, the senior conservator on the H.L. Hunley project, points to the clear lens from the lantern from the Confederate submarine in a lab in North Charleston, S.C., on Thursday, April 19, 2012. In back is an X-ray image of what the lantern, found aboard the sub that was the first in history to sink an enemy warship, looked like after the sub was raised 12 years ago. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
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The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sits in its slings on Friday, June 24, 2011 at a conservation lab in North Charleston, S.C.. The Hunley, the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship, was rotated upright this week for the first time since it sank with its crew of eight in 1864 The hole at the lower right is on a side of the sub not seen in almost 150 years. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
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The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sits in a conservation tank after a steel truss that had surrounded it was removed on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012 at a conservation lab in North Charleston, S.C. Scientists say removing the truss allows the first clear view of the sub since it sank in 1864 off the South Carolina coast. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
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The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sits in a conservation tank after a steel truss that had surrounded it was removed on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012 at a conservation lab in North Charleston, S.C. Scientists say removing the truss allows the first clear view of the sub since it sank in 1864 off the South Carolina coast. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)
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Confederate re-enactors and members of the Portsmouth Submariners Association of Portsmouth, United Kingdom, stand at attention at the graveside of the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley in Charleston, S.C., on Friday, Feb. 17, 2012. A member of the association earlier placed a poppy wreath at the gravesite as British submariners paid tribute to the crew of the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. (AP PhotoBruce Smith)

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