Don't be hypocritical

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I am in full agreement with the outrage expressed by many citizens as a result of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling’s reported views on race. However, I do not think that Mr. Sterling’s remarks are any more damaging than the degrading and dehumanizing expressions made by hip-hop artists such as rappers and spoken-word professionals.

Every day and minute black people who subscribe to hip-hop bombard themselves with profanity, misogyny, words of self-hatred and the like. They themselves in fact use these negative expressions as terms of “endearment.” Mr. Sterling’s words do not seem to be much different from those used by hip-hop artists. In fact, some people might argue that Mr. Sterling’s words are in no way as damaging as those used by hip-hop artists.

Why then is there such a firestorm of rebuttal surrounding his words? But there is no noticeable equal outrage expressed against the damaging phrases used by hip-hop artists and even by black people themselves.

This is hypocritical! Is American society saying that it is all right for blacks to degrade themselves but that someone such as Sterling better not do it? As a black person myself who abhors all forms of degradation of people, how can we overlook the damage that we heap upon ourselves but then become so hypocritical toward people such as Mr. Sterling?

Let us be consistent in expressing outrage toward degrading remarks, whoever may express them – including Mr. Sterling and hip-hop, too.

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deestafford
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deestafford 04/30/14 - 01:13 am
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Mr Hutcherson, You are right on point...

Mr. Hutcherson, You are right on point. Until the majority of people in the black community has the attitude you do and act upon it the black community problems will not improve.

Sad to say, many young people in the white community are starting to copy some of the same music.

WarrenvilleRepublican
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WarrenvilleRepublican 04/30/14 - 02:35 am
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Well Said

Sterling has obviously proved himself to be a world class ignoramus. With that being said he is being evicorated for an opinion (no matter how appalling) he shared in private. Michael Douglas' character in the movie of The American President sums this up perfectly:

America is advanced citizenship. You gotta want it bad, 'cause it's gonna put up a fight. It's gonna say "You want free speech? Let's see you acknowledge a man whose words make your blood boil, who's standing center stage and advocating at the top of his lungs that which you would spend a lifetime opposing at the top of yours. You want to claim this land as the land of the free? Then the symbol of your country can't just be a flag; the symbol also has to be one of its citizens exercising his right to burn that flag in protest. Show me that, defend that, celebrate that in your classrooms. Then, you can stand up and sing about the "land of the free".

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 06:03 am
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Speaking of hypocrites....how
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Speaking of hypocrites....how about using racial slurs to denounce racial slurs?

Beware of the language:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQlsSk7sCRM

karradur
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karradur 04/30/14 - 07:11 am
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@Pond Life

That video had some very coarse language, but when was a racial slur used in it?

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 07:23 am
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Calling someone "redneck,
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Calling someone "redneck, white bread, etc" is not a racial slur? Just what is it then?

Truth Matters
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Truth Matters 04/30/14 - 07:46 am
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"I do not think that Mr.

"I do not think that Mr. Sterling’s remarks are any more damaging than the degrading and dehumanizing expressions made by hip-hop artists such as rappers and spoken-word professionals."

Mr. Hutcherson, you raise some good points. I submit the following for your consideration:

Some of use need to ask if we actively supported Tipper Gore's effort to clean up the music lyrics? (That is a rhetorical question because she was aiming the industry you identified.) I didn't, because I felt it was about those "other people." If I recall, she did not have a lot of supporters but was able to get some labels applied to music as a warning to parents. If people stop buying the music, the language will change. But the reality is that the people who buy that music will not be those of us on this comment page. (Very little of what the 40 under listen to would be my genre of choice__I'm old school.)

I fail to see this as a case of hypocrisy. For one, we KNOW who the music artists are who have these awful utterances and we can stay away from them and chose NOT to patronize them. This man hid his bigotry, thus many of those who worked for him and did business with him did not know the awful beliefs he harbored. I believe the coach who happens to be Black when he says he never heard or saw any of this coming.

The NYT recently published an issue about how the wealthy almost always get their wishes in the political arena, thus translating into public policy for their benefit and not necessarily the benefit of the middle class and working poor. (Thanks to SCOTUS, even more so now.) Money buys influence. The Sterlings of the world have money to influence public policy in ways hip hop artists can only dream of having. His bigotry can translate into public policy and can impact not only the players who work for him, but can impact the whole nation were he to use his power as say, the Koch brothers.

If there were moral clauses for the music industry as there are apparently for the NBA, we wouldn't have the foul language because the industry would police itself. I have heard some music artists say that they missed out on potentially lucrative contracts because they REFUSED to use the language you described. Those moral stories rarely make the news. As it stands now, moral people such as you and I must protest with our wallets, and make sure that our children and grandchildren do likewise.

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 07:49 am
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The fact that he hid his
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The fact that he hid his bigotry sounds more commendable than the rappers who flaunt it. You can't help you you think or feel, but how you act on it is what matters.

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 07:50 am
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Again with the Koch
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Again with the Koch brothers......Do you ever use the same ire toward Soros?

localguy55
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localguy55 04/30/14 - 07:51 am
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Mr. Hutcherson, it is the

Mr. Hutcherson,

it is the whacked out world we live in today. if an African American espouses conservative views they are denounced as an uncle tom; When a white conservative criticizes Obama, he is labeled a racist.

As you have pointed out Black hip hop artists use the B_ _ _ hes and W_ _ s to describe women; the "N" word and the "MF" word are thrown around as if it is just part of the every day lexicon.

Yet, let any white person use these words in any form and they are looked upon with disdain.

And then there is North eastern white guilt. Anytime any minority rants about any perceived racial injustice, whether actual or fabricated, many whites cower and refuse to challenge the assertions of false racial injustice, even when there is clear evidence.

Als, there are the Jessy Jacksons and Al Sharptons of the world that perpetuate race tensions in this country. They have made a good living of stirring up the race hatred pot.

Let one isolated incident occur and one or both of there people are there to offer their spin. But where are they when black children are murdered in Chicago, or Detroit because of gang warfare. They are nowhere to be found.

By the way, the over use of the word "racist" is swiftly becoming relegated to "the sky is falling" status; meaning very little as people tend not to blink an eye to it's use anymore.

So, this is where we are in the world today. Up is down and down is up. Go figure how people have come to this sad state of affairs. Not much makes sense anymore with so many double standards used today. Rather than America and the bill of rights protecting people, it is more reminiscent of Nazi Germany of the mid to late 1930s.

karradur
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karradur 04/30/14 - 07:55 am
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@Pond Life

Ah yes, because only white people are allowed to use words that are simultaneously prideful of the self and shameful of the other.

I'll pass that along to Gretchen Wilson.

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 08:14 am
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karradur? White bread is
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karradur? White bread is prideful? Why the double standard with rap singers? Good grief.....you demonstrate the hypocrisy of this article perfectly. Thanks. I'll pass that on to Jay Z.

So, Jay Z can use the "N" word, but white people can't.

Grechen Wilson can use the "R" word......but so can everybody else.

Nope...no hypocrisy there at all.

jaymai
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jaymai 04/30/14 - 08:35 am
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Does anyone know anything

Does anyone know anything about the concept of "branding"? As despicable as it may be so some people, the "brand" of some in the hip hop industry allows for certain words and phrases (i.e. profanity and racial slurs). The brand of certain comedians is to use derogatory terms as well. Jeff Foxworthy uses the term "redneck". I (a black man) can't call my white co-workers "redneck" and claim I'm only parroting Foxworthy. The brand of a strip club is to have naked women dancing on stage. I can't dance naked on my desk at work and claim if it's okay for strippers to do it, why can't I? So to compare what Sterling said, a businessman who represents the National Basketball Association to a rap artist is ludicrous. The NBA's brand was jeopardized by Mr. Sterling's comments and his actions had to be addressed. Similarly, if L'il Wayne went on stage and decided he was going to sing "How Great Thou Art", I'm sure his bosses would have some words with him too.

Truth Matters
6886
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Truth Matters 04/30/14 - 08:45 am
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@jaymai--8:35 am You said it

@jaymai--8:35 am
You said it well.

Truth Matters
6886
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Truth Matters 04/30/14 - 08:59 am
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@loyalguy Context is

@loyalguy

Context is everything. On the tapes that I heard, Mr. Sterling did not use any of the racial slurs that have been offered here. So this is about more than racial slurs. However, that does not negate the full context of his comments. The NBA league recognized that.

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 09:05 am
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Yes jaymai....a double
Unpublished

Yes jaymai....a double standard does exist, and Snoop violated it....but gets no flack about it.....defended in fact.

karradur
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karradur 04/30/14 - 09:06 am
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Let me make sure I understand this.

White people CAN use "the R word" to describe other white people, as evidenced by Gretchen Wilson, Tyler Farr, Billy Ray Cyrus, Brooks & Dunn, George Strait, Craig Morgan, Blake Shelton, Jeff Foxworthy, "Redneck Pride" memorabilia, and millions of #redneck tags on Twitter and Instagram.

Black people CANNOT use "the R word" to describe white people.

White people CANNOT use "the N word" to describe black people.

Black people CANNOT use "the N word" to describe black people.

It all makes sense now!

Truth Matters
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Truth Matters 04/30/14 - 09:11 am
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PL.."The fact that he hid his

PL.."The fact that he hid his bigotry sounds more commendable than the rappers who flaunt it."

The KKK hid their bigotry during the day, but came out in hoods at night to terrorize Blacks and Whites who would stop their agenda. During the day many wore suits and ties and help positions of power and influence.

I am NOT equating this man with the KKK, but to think nothing of people hiding their true motives is so disturbing.

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 09:11 am
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No karradur...Black people
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No karradur...Black people can and DO use the "N" word all the time and suffer no consequences. What planet have you been living on?

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 09:12 am
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TM....perhaps "keeping it to
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TM....perhaps "keeping it to yourself" would be a better way to word it than hiding it. The KKK hid their bigotry, but certainly didn't keep it to themselves.

karradur
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karradur 04/30/14 - 09:13 am
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@Pond Life

So you have no problem with black people using "the N word" to describe black people?

Therefore, what Snoop Lion said is NOT hypocritical, because both white people and black people have a word they can use for their own race, but the other race can't use it?

jaymai
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jaymai 04/30/14 - 09:18 am
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@Pond Life - 9:05 am

"Yes jaymai....a double standard does exist, and Snoop violated it....but gets no flack about it.....defended in fact."

No, that is NOT a "double standard." Snoop is a rapper. The words he uses to express himself are part of his "brand", whether you accept it or not. Most of his fans know that when they hold a microphone up to Snoop they're not going to get "Hallelujah, praise the Lord...". A double standard would be if white rapper Eminem were not allowed to use the same words as Snoop, or Charlotte Bobcats owner Michael Jordan was caught on tape saying he didn't want any white people at his games, and go unpunished.

Bizkit
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Bizkit 04/30/14 - 09:20 am
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It doesn't matter what he

It doesn't matter what he said-he said it in private and it is constitutional free speech. His girlfriend recorded him and then released his comments-which is an attack on his privacy. Now people are reacting to his comments which they have a right to do. But his punishments and banning are all likely illegal because of the breach of privacy. He is being discriminated against legally-he has a right to free speech. He could have said he hates all white people or hispanics or asians and only loves blacks and it would still be protected free speech. I wonder if he had said that would there be all the fuss? I just can't believe most people are so ignorant they still believe in "races"-it reminds me of the Nazi's and the superior race mentality.

Bizkit
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Bizkit 04/30/14 - 09:26 am
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Rappers have the same right

Rappers have the same right to free speech as Sterling. There is no difference both have a right to say discriminatory, hateful, and violent comments if they so choose. Why should either be punished for free speech. "Branding" sounds like cattle and cloning with a lack of individuality. I am not real familiar with rap but it isn't all the same is it. Like when you say "jazz"-that encompasses a lot of styles-bebop, free, new orleans, latin-fusion, swing,etc. Rap doesn't have diversity?

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 09:28 am
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Amazing....they defend the
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Amazing....they defend the black racists all day long...rationalize, and even alter reality. Snoop wasn't using the "N" word. He was using racial slurs towards whites.....if a white uses slurs towards blacks they get crucified....the blacks do it, and you people defend them to the end of the Earth....thus the hypocrisy.

karradur
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karradur 04/30/14 - 09:29 am
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@Bizkit

The First Amendment protects people from retaliation by the government for expressing an opinion, not from other people. Everyone has the right to an opinion. The NBA, as a private organization, has the right to do whatever it wants with their members.

Do you feel that the Boy Scouts are also being discriminatory for not allowing openly gay Scoutmasters?

karradur
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karradur 04/30/14 - 09:31 am
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@Pond Life

I am asking you two questions directly that require only a "yes" or "no" answer.

Do you feel that it should be permittable for white people to use "the R word" to describe other white people?

Do you feel that it should be permittable for black people to use "the N word" to describe other black people?

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 09:31 am
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The First Amendment protects
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The First Amendment protects people from retaliation by the government for expressing an opinion, not from other people.

That I agree with....but it doesn't protect people from being hypocrites. Which is what the article is about.

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 09:34 am
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Yes and yes. No you answer
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Yes and yes. No you answer this.

Do you think it is permittable for white people to use the "N" word to describe black people?

do you think it is permittable for black people to use the "R" word to describe white people?

Actually, permittable isn't the right word. Legally it is all permittable, but that is a different debate.

karradur
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karradur 04/30/14 - 09:38 am
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@Pond Life

The answer to both is yes. You are legally allowed to state anything you want. Others are legally allowed to exclude you from their private social organizations, express condemnation of your opinions, and/or form arguments of an ethical or logical nature to refute your statements.

Pond Life
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Pond Life 04/30/14 - 09:40 am
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So then...why do the white's
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So then...why do the white's get crucified if they do it, but the blacks don't?

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