And they get paid anyway?

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A front-page article of the Oct. 17 Augusta Chronicle read, “Workers furloughed without pay when the shutdown began Oct. 1 will receive back pay.” Is this statement correct? Have we just uncovered another reason to not have another government shutdown?

When public school teachers are furloughed, they lose their pay for those days. When business employees are furloughed, they lose their pay for those days.

Are we really paying government employees, who were off the job for two weeks, the pay that they would have earned? If so, I guess it can be chalked up as another reason that surveys of government pay and benefits consistently show that government employees receive more than private-sector employees.

This is ludicrous!

Norm Diebold

Augusta

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KSL
143396
Points
KSL 10/27/13 - 10:38 pm
11
3
You are darned right, it is.

You are darned right, it is.

KSL
143396
Points
KSL 10/28/13 - 12:45 am
11
3
Got to love double paid

Got to love double paid vacation.

MTBer
643
Points
MTBer 10/28/13 - 05:37 am
14
3
Unreal

The so-called furlough is ridiculous. Get told to stay home, and then when the "furlough" is over, come back to work. Not only did you get paid to sit at home, but you are not charged any type of leave for the time did not have to report to work.

Then there were those that had to report to work because they were considered "essential". They went to work and did their job, knowing that others considered "non-essential" got free vacations.

Truth Matters
8084
Points
Truth Matters 10/28/13 - 06:21 am
2
15
The tone of these posts seem

The tone of these posts seem to infer blame directed at the workers. They didn't orchestrate the shutdown. The stress of not knowing when, or IF they would return to work was no "free vacation."

JRC2024
10381
Points
JRC2024 10/28/13 - 07:05 am
12
1
Truth, no one is blaming the

Truth, no one is blaming the workers. They are just frustrated that Federal government workers including the Congress always have better deals and at taxpayer expense. They lost nothing--not like the private sector who loses pay when told to stay home.

gcap
290
Points
gcap 10/28/13 - 07:30 am
11
2
I wish everyone understood one thing...

Government employees are just that -- employees. Please quit calling them government workers. They are EMPLOYEES and not productive workers and get paid (not earn) too much to begin with. The private sector seldom hires former government employees.

deestafford
31709
Points
deestafford 10/28/13 - 07:43 am
10
3
The cry of the supporters of paying them is "But it's not their

fault." How many people are laid off in the private sector through no fault of their own continue to get paid? None.

Many government workers are like seagulls: They just sit around squawk, crap on things, and are protected by Congress.

burninater
9921
Points
burninater 10/28/13 - 08:44 am
3
10
gcap, I work for a private

gcap, I work for a private sector geologic firm that works on critical infrastructure -- pipelines, dams, nuclear, etc.

Almost all of these large-scale projects are partnerings between the private sector and gov't agencies. It is quite common to find engineers, scientists, project managers, QA specialists etc. on these jobs who have gone from gov't to private sector. This idea that there is a hard and fast line between the public and private sectors, at least in the large-scale construction and infrastructure sector, is purely false. Also false is the statement that these gov't scientists, engineers, project managers, etc. are less productive, or better compensated, than their private sector counterparts.

burninater
9921
Points
burninater 10/28/13 - 09:01 am
4
8
Dee, the only gov't employees

Dee, the only gov't employees that had any say in the shutdown, and back pay, were those sitting in Congress.

There is a clear villain in this piece -- those in Congress who wasted our tax dollars on their "moral victory" ego adventure.

On a sidenote, an online comment forum where at least every other post is some type of complaint is a funny place to accuse others of sitting around, squawking, and crapping on things, wouldn't you say?

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 10/28/13 - 09:58 am
6
1
The only ones I know of that
Unpublished

The only ones I know of that are to receive back pay are the ones that had to work for no pay. SRS employees, for sure, will not receive back pay because they are not government employees.

griff6035
4279
Points
griff6035 10/28/13 - 10:54 am
2
1
Back pay

Only Federal Government Employees get the sweetheart deal, absolutely not right, but let a rumor start about Base Closures and listen to the howls from the Business community and Politicians.

myfather15
56419
Points
myfather15 10/28/13 - 01:53 pm
3
1
The bottom line is,

The bottom line is, governments of every level are ridiculously out of control!! I've witnessed it from the smallest towns, to the largest (Federal) form of government. They will spend money that absolutely NOONE would dare spend in the private sector!! Just like Mitch McConnell's sweetheart deal in this government shutdown vote. He got 2.9 billion dollars for a bill in Kentucky to build a dam!! This job was slated to cost 755 million dollars, but he got 2.9 billion for it!!

Burninator; since you are in this line of work, can you please explain to us; or me if I'm the only one curious; how does the price of building a dam skyrocket over 3 times the original cost? I realize there are MANY jobs, which end up costing more than the estimate; that's pretty normal. But for something to cost 2.9 billion, that was estimated at 755 million, seems quite ridiculous.

Then, to throw the vote to fund this bill, in the middle of the debt/government shutdown vote; also raises my suspicion.

It's so much easier to spend money (taxpayer money) that you don't have to earn; than it is to spend money you actually have to work for and won't be replaced so easily.

burninater
9921
Points
burninater 10/28/13 - 03:51 pm
1
1
myfather, I'm not on the

myfather, I'm not on the appropriations side of things, but there's a pretty clear reason for the price difference on that one:

"Congress first authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to replace the 1920s-era lock and dam system 25 years ago, when the Corps said it would cost $775 million. The authorization was later boosted to $1.5 billion and then increased to $2.9 billion as part of the deal to open the government. (The Corps actually estimates the project will cost $3.1 billion.)"

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/10/mitch-mcconnell-kentucky-dam-proje...

It isn't gov't inefficiency that does not allow us to do things now for what it would have cost 25 years ago.

burninater
9921
Points
burninater 10/28/13 - 04:27 pm
2
0
As an example of how things

As an example of how things can change in 25 years beyond the simple metric of overall inflation, a preliminary investigation for Vogtle Units 3 and 4 discovered that a limestone unit under the site is karsted -- it has voids and caves in it. This was previously entirely unknown -- USGS karst maps don't show that type of dissolving of rock much farther north than the GA/FL border. I don't know if they had planned on building on top of that material prior to the discovery of the caves, but discovering the voids mandated that entire rock unit be excavated and removed prior to construction. If this weren't part of the cost estimate, it would have greatly increased the excavation and backfill costs beyond simple inflation.

This is just one small example of the types of massive changes that can occur in the scope of a project of this magnitude. It also isn't realistic to compare the change in costs over time of a large infrastructure project like this to the increase in consumer prices, because these aren't mass-produced items. Every project is a unique case, that demands individual research and design efforts.

Imagine how much the costs of cars, for instance, would increase over time if every single vehicle not only needed to be designed individually from the ground up, but then had to have developed, constructed, and staffed an assembly line unique to each and every one...

Further, imagine that a design or construction flaw in that car wouldn't just create incredible financial and safety burdens on the occupants, but would potentially devastate entire cities downstream or downwind at worst, or wipe out power generation for tens of thousands of business and residential customers at best.

There are profound reasons why purely private companies are rarely willing to take on projects of this scale. If they thought they could do it more efficiently and profitably than gov't, they'd be doing it.

KSL
143396
Points
KSL 10/28/13 - 08:43 pm
2
1
Get rid of baseline

Get rid of baseline budgeting. Did you see the link I posted about the ridiculous amount the fed agencies spent on last minute expenses before the shutdown? Did Nancy see it? Oh, that would make no dif to her botoxed brain

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