Get your heads in the game

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Have you ever attempted to talk politics in public? This is now a new challenge for me. Over the past week or so I have made the effort to initiate conversations about the current struggles in Washington. I am presented with few opportunities do so, and therefore use my neighborhood, after-school sporting events and after-school enrichment program gathering places for this trial at finding the pulse of the people.

What I have discovered is that we, the people, have an extremely weak pulse.

Simply put, I can generally engage one person in a room to discuss the current events that affect all of us immensely. The others in the room are quick to stare at their cell phones and never look up, or begin a new conversation with others in the room. In shocking contrast, if I were to ask if anyone had seen last weekend’s University of Georgia football game, an entire room of people would participate in the conversation. Some would be happy for a win, others angry, many would know each play and statistics by heart, but a discussion could happen with great involvement and respect given to all views.

I would love to see the same enthusiasm for our government and the teams in this “game.” The game of the week is replaying daily – the House vs. Senate by day, and the Democrats vs. Republicans by night. The media, as expected, are using the instant replay; unfortunately they will show only one camera angle.

The angle provided does not portray the plays
accurately. This game is too important to lose, and all of us need to demand that the outcome is fair and best for the country. In this game, we have the opportunity not only to be armchair quarterbacks but to help lead the team.

Educate yourself. Know the players, the plays, the risks and the rewards. If you are confident in your ability to lead, then lead. You must now teach, inspire and motivate the rest of the team – we the people.

It is the responsibility of all of us to know the stats of the most important game in the country. We must then become engaged and involved because the outcome of this game has a greater consequence.

Jodi Lott

Evans

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deestafford
32319
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deestafford 10/21/13 - 08:08 am
3
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Too many people want to look at our participatory system

of government as a spectator sport.

Our system of government depends on an educated populace and unfortunately each generation is becoming less educated that the one before it. If one does not believe this just look at some of the middle school and high school exit exams from a hundred or more years ago and one would see that many college students would fail them.

When Alexis de Tocqueville arrived in America in 1831 to try to figure out the secrets of the enormous economic success of the country he was so taken back by our school system that he wrote much about what he saw. What he saw really impressed him. Unlike schools in Europe, American schools taught the children values and he noticed there was extensive use of the Bible in public schools. Both of which are absent in today's education programs.

He was particularly impressed that anyone finishing the second grade could read and write and even when he visited the frontier he was astounded how common people were engaging in intelligent conversation, reading newspapers, and understanding the various branches of the government.

How far we have fallen. Now people can't tell you about the the three branches of government, but they can tell you about: Oprah, American Idol, Glee, The Voice, Dancing with the Stars, People Magazine and the list of airhead junk goes on.

When one considers all of this, is it any wonder we are in the downward spirial economically and morally we find ourselves?

Riverman1
94467
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Riverman1 10/21/13 - 08:09 am
3
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Nice Letter

That's why we have the Internet and online comment sections for newspapers. You can influence far more people here. Nice letter with a valid point that people should become more involved, though.

Riverman1
94467
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Riverman1 10/21/13 - 08:11 am
1
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Politics have become so

Politics have become so Hollywoodified presidential elections should have debates with talent competition and swimsuit competition.

rmwhitley
5547
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rmwhitley 10/21/13 - 08:41 am
0
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The problem
Unpublished

we face is a culture pretending to lead, yet has NEVER been able to control themselves. Our destruction (from within) was predicted many years ago. If I had known things were going to be this sorry, I would have picked my own cotton.

gaflyboy
5370
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gaflyboy 10/21/13 - 08:47 am
2
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Good letter!

RM1 - Presidential elections have always been more of a popularity contest than voters selecting the best candidate. Presidents have been elected because too many voters were impressed with their saxophone playing skill, the crease in their pants, being cool enough to “slow jam” or their general good looks. They hear how candidates sound without hearing what they say.

The writer is correct in her assertions. Most people tend to follow the axiom “If you want to keep your friends, never discuss politics or religion”. But discussing it is the best way to generate interest so that people will educate themselves on what is happening, why it’s happening and what should be happening. Unfortunately, because of the failure of our school system, those that do find themselves starting from scratch. And like any other education, you don’t learn by reading one or two articles. It takes listening to both sides, learning about our government and a little history and thinking for yourself.

“We must then become engaged and involved because the outcome of this game has a greater consequence.” And without an educated and engaged populous, the consequences grow direr every day.

Fiat_Lux
16454
Points
Fiat_Lux 10/21/13 - 09:33 am
2
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IMO, a lot of people have just given up.

Who knows how many citizens who once were actively interested and informed have seen how useless it is to involve themselves in the political process. Their votes, the active input of normal productive Americans, people of faith, socially constructive values and good character, has little impact these days on the outcome of elections. Their voices and protests are mocked, ridiculed, labeled as treasonous by government officials and, finally, ignored by "leaders" who happily force catastrophic policies upon the nation's wage earners while exempting themselves and their pet voting blocks from the effects.

A lot of people are just waiting for it all to come crashing down around our ears.

crkgrdn
2287
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crkgrdn 10/21/13 - 09:31 am
1
2
The American people

get what they richly deserve.

fedex227
11187
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fedex227 10/21/13 - 09:07 pm
0
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You have to admit it's true that two of the most ...
Unpublished

polarizing topics of discussion are politics and religion (this forum is a perfect example). But I think people can be politically aware and still not want to discuss the topic during a neighborhood stroll or while watching little Johnny's soccer game. I don't consider that indicative of people having a 'weak pulse.'

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