Is dissolution inevitable?

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I’m deeply grieved by the calls for “a new civil war” that have been published in The Augusta Chronicle recently (Joaquin Godoy and Pamela Leonard). I fear this kind of talk because I view that outcome as practically inevitable now.

I’ve recently been studying “the war of Northern aggression” in observance of the 150th anniversary of those events, and the level of bloodshed and human misery endured in this country are not to be lightly bandied about.

The causes of that war were both economic, as Southern apologists say and social, because the abominable institution of slavery could not have been allowed to stand forever. There is no contradiction in this, because slavery was the economy of the wealthiest 1 percent in the South who led the secessionist movement.

The new slavery is debt. Solomon was correct when he said “the debtor is servant to the lender.” Some privately negotiated debts are reasonable; we make these contracts so we can buy a car to drive to work to pay the debt, and so on. When an all-powerful central government with the power to tax contracts debts that the taxpayers do not choose, that is servitude.

All the economic forecasts indicate a crisis in the making. The U.S. government could not balance its current budget if it confiscated 100 percent of the income of the wealthiest 1 percent. In the near future all of the income of all citizens will be insufficient. That will amount to universal slavery.

I weep when I contemplate the life the Obama, Reid, Pelosi, Godoy cabal are preparing for my son on his fifth birthday.

If I saw the temperature and pressure in a reaction vessel increasing on the sort of curve our national debt is following, I’d run for the bomb shelter. A cataclysm seems inevitable. If that day comes, and the progressive cadre takes up arms and appears at my home to collect what is “owed” them, there will be bloodshed.

I doubt that Leonard’s preferred “fair tax” or any other tax reform can stave off the dissolution of our current government. We all should be mindful of the tragedy of 150 years ago, and work toward a civilized resolution to our difficulties. If we can’t achieve that, then may God protect the weak and strengthen the hand of the just.

Tim Vincent

Aiken, S.C.

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madgerman
236
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madgerman 08/03/12 - 05:58 am
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I believe that Timmy needs to
Unpublished

I believe that Timmy needs to tell us what "tragedy" he is refering to, 150 years ago. Was it slavery and the inability of the south to free people, or was it voting and giving some people the right to vote as a full person? So come on Timmy, tell us what the "civilized resolution" the south was working toward back then. P.S. just why did God allow such a slaughter anyway, him being all powerful and all knowing.

Riverman1
86885
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Riverman1 08/03/12 - 07:29 am
2
2
I'm All for Trying, But I Suspect It's Hopeless

It’s pretty much hopeless that a civil war like conflict can be avoided. As with Greece when the majority of the population depends on government handouts, we are doomed. They won’t give up the payoffs and won’t stop taking until all wealth is redistributed to them via every method known.

Jon Lester
2363
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Jon Lester 08/03/12 - 10:32 am
2
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Is your solution to continue to vote against our best interests

in favor of those of the wealthiest Americans, many of whom caused the debt crisis in the first place?

Riverman1
86885
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Riverman1 08/03/12 - 11:10 am
3
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Jon Lester, define "our best

Jon Lester, define "our best interests" and explain how conservatives vote against them? I'm talking about protecting the wealth of the entire 51% who earn money and have a positive contribution to the treasury. Favoring them would be a good idea.

historylover
11156
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historylover 08/03/12 - 07:14 pm
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Scary

I cannot believe that you people are discussing an unavoidable civil war in our country. What is wrong with you? Please, if you hate those of us with differing opinions and ideas, just leave and found your own country. I happen to prefer this one to remain in peace.

JRC2024
9287
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JRC2024 08/04/12 - 10:08 pm
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Me too history. I have no

Me too history. I have no problem except for the entitlement mentality of some that think myself and other successful people owe them.

sconservative
61
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sconservative 08/06/12 - 07:59 am
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The South did form a new

The South did form a new nation. Lincoln rejected their actions and invaded. The North had all the advantages: 3 to 1 population, 30 to 1 manufacturing base, etc. Things have changed in 150 years. The sunbelt is prospering vs. the rustbelt. Northern "elites" are still trying to force their opinions on the nation. In the 1800s it was anti-slavery; now is pro-homosexuality and pro progressive-socialism. Hopefully the "Bible belt" will continue to reject the blasphemy and save the nation from the rampant Chicago-style corruption. If the Union remains intact, then bailouts of failed states (NY, IL, CA, etc) will destroy us all. The South should definitely refuse to enforce unfunded mandates like EMTALA and MedicAID.

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