Plea bargain is easy way out

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I wish prosecutors would not say they’re doing us a favor when they plea-bargain a premeditated murder to a sentence of life in prison (“Pair in slaying get life,” May 12). When a defendant is willing to accept life in prison, it is usually a good indicator that the prosecutor has more than enough evidence to send the defendant to death row.

The prosecutor is not saving us money, time or trauma with the plea bargain. There are two ways to do the job: the right way and the easy way. When a prosecutor plea-bargains a life sentence for a premeditated murder, he’s doing the job the easy way.

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Retired Army
17512
Points
Retired Army 06/06/12 - 01:16 am
2
10
Obviously an uninformed

Obviously an uninformed citizen. Survey after survey shows it's cheaper to keep her-and him.

copperhead
1035
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copperhead 06/06/12 - 08:17 am
7
3
RA,the cost of two 30-06

RA,the cost of two 30-06 bullets is way less than 50+ years of upkeep in prison condos! Liberals are all for killing innocent unborns but want to support murderers and rapists for life! Odd,huh?

Techfan
6461
Points
Techfan 06/06/12 - 08:47 am
5
11
So are conservatives all for

So are conservatives all for supporting innocent unborns for life?

allhans
23288
Points
allhans 06/06/12 - 09:21 am
8
1
There should be no reason for

There should be no reason for conservatives, or anyone other than the parents, to HAVE the need to support anyone for life.

Shea_Addams
1337
Points
Shea_Addams 06/06/12 - 10:01 am
11
3
Yes Techfan....Conservatives
Unpublished

Yes Techfan....Conservatives are for supporting inniocen unborns for life....by their parents.

Only the entitlement crowd thinks that it is someone else's responsibility....and that being killed is better than being poor.

Shea_Addams
1337
Points
Shea_Addams 06/06/12 - 10:09 am
7
3
RA...please show us where
Unpublished

RA...please show us where these surveys are that show it's cheaper to keep someone in prison than to execute them. Keep in mind that it is clearly stated in the rules of this site that it is against the rules to make "unsubstantiated claims." Might want to back up that claim before Sean pulls your post.

DMPerryJr
1698
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DMPerryJr 06/06/12 - 10:41 am
9
0
I Have No Idea

about what the costs are because I don't pay attention to that sort of stuff. I simply believe that cold blooded murderers and child abusers should be executed. Recently, in my neck of the woods, a child was left with her stepfather while her mother went to work. The stepfather put the child's head through a wall. The child is clinging to life. The boy has done fessed up - why not just take him out behind the jail and put him down? It's the best thing for all parties, including the abuser.
My position has absolutely nothing to do with my political leanings - or lack thereof.

Jane18
12332
Points
Jane18 06/06/12 - 11:09 am
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1
Mr. Shea's letter

Short, very much to the point, and so very true. When there is absolutely no doubt as to the guilt of a premeditated murderer and/or rapist, I agree one hundred percent with your letter. Every time I hear that a plea was offered, I too, am very upset. Obviously, there are people commenting here that have never had a relative or friend murdered or raped. I sincerely hope they never do...................

dichotomy
30663
Points
dichotomy 06/06/12 - 12:04 pm
8
1
Cheaper?

Well, if do it because it's cheaper, logic follows that it would be cheaper not to lock up most criminals. Oh.......we already started doing that didn't we? Our stupid legislators actually just passed a law that dictates they cannot lock up a thief unless the thief steals ENOUGH. All in the name of "cheaper".

Yep.....CHEAP......that's how I want my criminal NO-justice system.

Instead of a TSPLOST they should be pushing for a PSPLOST to build more prisons and a few more of them little rooms with a big window, a cold steel gurney, and a couple of IV bag hangers. Then we could elect some judges and prosecutors that are willing to use them.

Stercus accidit
120
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Stercus accidit 06/06/12 - 12:22 pm
6
3
I supported capital

I supported capital punishment for a long time, but the more I learned about it, the more I came to oppose it. In the end, several factors changed my mind:

1. By far the most compelling is this: Sometimes the legal system gets it wrong. In the last 30 years in the U.S., over 100 people have been released from death row because they were exonerated by DNA evidence. These are ALL people who were found guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt.” Unfortunately, DNA evidence is not available in most cases. So, as long as the death penalty is in place, you are pretty much GUARANTEED to occasionally execute an innocent person.

The system can make tragic mistakes. In 2004, the state of Texas executed Cameron Todd Willingham for starting the fire that killed his children. The Texas Forensic Science Commission found that the arson testimony that led to his conviction was based on flawed science. As of today, 138 wrongly convicted people on death row have been exonerated. DNA is rarely available in homicides, often irrelevant (as in Willingham’s case) and can’t guarantee we won’t execute innocent people. Capital juries are dominated by people who favor the death penalty and are more likely to vote to convict.

Research The West Memphis 3 for another great example of this.

Really, that should be reason enough for most people to oppose it. If you need more, read on:

2. Because of higher pre-trial expenses, longer trials, jury sequestration, extra expenses associated with prosecuting & defending a DP case, and the appeals process (which is necessary - see reason #1), it costs taxpayers MUCH more to execute prisoners than to imprison them for life.

3. The deterrent effect is questionable at best. Violent crime rates are actually higher in death penalty jurisdictions. This may seem counterintuitive, and there are many theories about why this is (Ted Bundy saw it as a challenge, so he chose Florida – the most active execution state at the time – to carry out his final murder spree). It could be that the high cost (see #2) drains resources from police departments, education, and other government programs that help prevent crime. Personally, I think it has to do with the hypocrisy of taking a stand against murder…by killing people. The government fosters a culture of violence by saying, ‘do as I say, not as I do.’

4. There’s also an argument to be made that death is too good for the worst criminals. Let them wake up and go to bed every day of their lives in a prison cell, and think about the freedom they DON’T have, until they rot of old age. When Ted Bundy was finally arrested in 1978, he told the police officer, “I wish you had killed me.” Khalid Shaikh Mohammed (the architect of the 9/11 attacks) would love nothing better than to be put to death. In his words, "I have been looking to be a martyr [for a] long time."

Also it might be interesting to note that families of murder victims are not unanimous about the death penalty. However, even families who have supported the death penalty in principal have testified that the drawn-out death penalty process is painful for them and that life without parole is an appropriate alternative. I'd also like to add the my best friend was murdered and I preferred her killer sitting in a jail cell for the rest of his then getting the easy way out of being "put to sleep".

Stercus accidit
120
Points
Stercus accidit 06/06/12 - 12:28 pm
6
6
"Prison is too easy" Most

"Prison is too easy"

Most people have never been in prison or knew anyone who has talked about prison life.

Most of the misconceptions come from what the Media and Entertainment industry like to portray. Most people these days believe anything that is in the movies and on TV!

Most people have no clue that many people in prison are good people who made bad mistakes and paying their debt to society. Most people have no clue that people are in prison for fighting for self-defense, driving without a license, first time drug possessions, etc. Not ALL inmates are rapists, murders or child molesters. Most inmates are in there for non-violent crimes...but we have to have consequences for our actions when we break the laws.

Plus many people think it's a luxury to sit around and do nothing but sleep, eat and read. But once they have to do that for years, it's not fun anymore. Most people do not want to know that the inmates' FAMILIES have to pay for many things like soap, shampoo, Tylenol, paper, stamps, etc. They rather continue believing that tax-payers pay for all this.

Anyone that thinks it is soft is living in a fantasy world. I think that our society is very tough on people for the crimes they commit. From the legal system that doesn't work well at all (unless you are wealthy and can afford a "dream team" to get you off), it is confusing, it is unfair (particularly against the poorest of the poor). The prisons are overcrowded, many of them are below standard, are close to be condemned, or are designed to treat people as sub - human - creating mental illness in a population already overflowing with mental health issues. Lack of proper physical and mental health care, adequate diet, and proper exercise are all issues in our prison system. Our system is designed to make better criminals - not create an atmosphere of reform and re-entry into the mainstream society. Then, once the prison term is finished, the person is subjected to prejudice in mainstream society - with difficulties finding a job, housing, education, all of the things we take for granted. The punishment just goes on and on - even after the person has served his time and his sentence - society is unforgiving. It is no wonder that we have some of the most violent and the most highest crime rates in the world.

I think it's bogus that after we've made a person serve his/her time in jail for the crimes he/she committed that we still insist that their crimes follow them for the rest of their lives. Why should someone be shunned for the rest of their lives when they've already paid for their mistake in the eyes of the law? Why should we deny them any chance at a decent job or even being able to educate themselves(Yes quite a few colleges deny people based on criminal records)? You're incredibly stupid if you think denying people a job or a way to secure a decent job will solve the problem. Why do you think so many of them wind up re-offending? Because there are no other ways they can support themselves.

Shea_Addams
1337
Points
Shea_Addams 06/06/12 - 01:40 pm
10
4
"Most people do not want to
Unpublished

"Most people do not want to know that the inmates' FAMILIES have to pay for many things like soap, shampoo, Tylenol, paper, stamps, etc. "

This is an incorrect statement. My brother is in prison and wants us to believe that as well...so we can send him money to buy BETTER soap, shampoo, etc. The prison will provide you with everything you NEED....anything your family sends you is for things you WANT. We contacted the prison administration and found this to be true.....I'll take their word over the criminals. The criminals are experts at suckering you out of your money.

DMPerryJr
1698
Points
DMPerryJr 06/06/12 - 02:57 pm
4
2
Deterrent?

I'm a pretty enlightened, semi-progressive Gen Xer and I will bite on some of the psychobabble...to a point.
But I care not at all about the deterrence argument. That is the layer of the onion that I just throw in the garbage, right along with any religion-based arguments for or against the use of capital punishment.
And I am 100% opposed to lethal injection. Now that is too expensive. I mean, I'll admit to not being bright, but even I can see that lethal injection costs more than other effective methods.

HighSociety
1840
Points
HighSociety 06/06/12 - 02:59 pm
5
1
Stercus said Most people

Stercus said
Most people have no clue that many people in prison are good people who made bad mistakes and paying their debt to society. Most people have no clue that people are in prison for fighting for self-defense, driving without a license, first time drug possessions, etc. Not ALL inmates are rapists, murders or child molesters. Most inmates are in there for non-violent crimes...but we have to have consequences for our actions when we break the laws.

You don't go to prison for driving without a license and its rare if someone gets any time for drug possession and that includes drugs like cocaine. True that all are not violent criminals, but those others are repeat offenders who should be in prison.

Shea_Addams
1337
Points
Shea_Addams 06/06/12 - 03:30 pm
5
2
Dont ya just love the
Unpublished

Dont ya just love the argument that our prisons are full of non-violent criminals.....like if they are not violent, we should just let them out.

Sounds good until they steal YOUR stuff.

Shea_Addams
1337
Points
Shea_Addams 06/06/12 - 03:31 pm
6
3
hmmmmmm....a thumbs down at
Unpublished

hmmmmmm....a thumbs down at 1:40 for pointing out that someone posted something that is not true, as was verified by actually speaking with prision adminstrators. Interesting.

itsanotherday1
40304
Points
itsanotherday1 06/06/12 - 03:39 pm
8
1
Stercus does make some valid

Stercus does make some valid points, the most important being about executing the innocent. That is the one thing that gives me indigestion about capital punishment.

itsanotherday1
40304
Points
itsanotherday1 06/06/12 - 03:40 pm
5
1
Shea, it just shows what a

Shea, it just shows what a sham the whole silly points thing is.

rmwhitley
5526
Points
rmwhitley 06/06/12 - 05:14 pm
0
0
"Survey after survey"
Unpublished

always amazes me when the person using the term cites no actual surveys. The state of Georgia, and the other 49 states, become the nations largest "nursing homes" for inmates recieving life terms. Who pays for the criminal's lifetime upkeep? The democratic national committee? I think not, fellow overtaxed conservative citizens.

Willow Bailey
20579
Points
Willow Bailey 06/06/12 - 06:39 pm
3
1
Shea, I don't do thumbs down,

Shea, I don't do thumbs down, but I will say straight out, I don't understand your attitude regarding your own brother. Perhaps the thumbs down reflects that same feeling in the owner.

KSL
121922
Points
KSL 06/06/12 - 07:29 pm
5
1
Dmperry, as far as the death

Dmperry, as far as the death penalty not being a deterrent can you please cite the number of people convicted of the death penalty, put to death, who have gone on to murder additional people? It most certainly is a deterent.

KSL
121922
Points
KSL 06/06/12 - 09:10 pm
3
1
Executing the innocent would

Executing the innocent would be pretty hard this day and age.

KSL
121922
Points
KSL 06/06/12 - 09:32 pm
3
1
This discussion actually got

This discussion actually got me thinking about a crime that occurred years ago. I had a cousin, a lady who was an elderly old maid school teacher. She was retired when I was in grammar school and lived with her mother.

I grew up and moved away. She remained in the small Victorian aged community of relatives I grew up in. One day a young man broke into her house (years after her mother had died).

He raped and robbed this skinny old maid lady. The amount of blood they found from this brutality was incredible, as told to me by mother. If anyone deserved the death penalty, that person did.

CobaltGeorge
150530
Points
CobaltGeorge 06/06/12 - 09:43 pm
3
1
KSL

There are many walking among us today that should have been Fried.

Some have repeated the same horrendous crime over again. It is the mindset of so many liberals that it is ok to kill unborn babies but cry at the thought of killing a derange human animal.

CobaltGeorge
150530
Points
CobaltGeorge 06/06/12 - 09:46 pm
0
1
Forgotten

The Victim or Victims are forgotten in our court system.

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